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3-D Images: Spirit
2004   |   2005   |   2006   |   2007   |   2008   |   2009
17-Dec-2004
 
Spirit's Surroundings on Sol 337 (3-D)
Spirit's Surroundings on Sol 337 (3-D)

This stereo view was assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 337th martian day, or sol (Dec. 14, 2004). Spirit's position, catalogued as Site 100 for the mission, was on the slope of "Husband Hill." The rover had driven 6 meters (20 feet) on Sol 337 after examining a rock called "Wishstone" for several sols. That rock is just to the left of the top of the arch traced by the rover tracks in this view. Spirit experienced slippage of up to 80 percent on uphill portions of the day's drive.

The view is presented here in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (107 kB) | Large (5.3 MB)
23-Nov-2004
 
 
Track of Right-Wheel Drag (3-D)
Track of Right-Wheel Drag (3-D)

This 360-degree stereo panorama combines several frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 313th martian day (Nov. 19, 2004). The site, labeled Spirit site 93, is in the "Columbia Hills" inside Gusev Crater. The rover tracks point westward. Spirit had driven eastward, in reverse and dragging its right front wheel, for about 30 meters (100 feet) on the day the picture was taken. Driving backwards while dragging that wheel is a precautionary strategy to extend the usefulness of the wheel for when it is most needed, because it has developed more friction than the other wheels. The right-hand track in this look backwards shows how the dragging disturbed the soil. This view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (368 kB) | Large (7.8 MB)
29-Oct-2004
 
'Wooly Patch' Rock in Color Stereo
'Wooly Patch' Rock in Color Stereo

Image processing experts at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory created this color stereo view of a rock studied by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit in July. The process of creating the image in color is similar to combining two slightly offset black-and-white images except that the colors corresponding to the two images are separated into offset right-eye and left-eye views. For comparison, the two-dimensional (non-stereo) image representing the panoramic-camera team's best attempt at generating a "true color" view of what this rock would look like if seen by a human on Mars was posted on the Web on July 30, 2004 http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/spirit/20040730a.html . The color image was generated from a mathematical combination of six calibrated images acquired through filters for wavelengths between 430 nanometers and 750 nanometers.

This image shows two holes created by Spirit's rock abrasion tool in a rock dubbed "Wooly Patch" near the base of the "Columbia Hills" inside Gusev Crater. The rover took the images with its panoramic camera on its 200th martian day, or sol (July 25, 2004). Scientists speculate that this relatively soft rock may have been altered by water; small cracks may be the result of interaction with water-rich fluids.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (35.7 kB) | Medium Image (109 kB) | Large (898 kB)
21-Oct-2004
 
 
A Rocky Rim Around 'Bonneville' in 3-D
A Rocky Rim Around 'Bonneville' in 3-D

This stereo view was taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the rover's 82nd martian day, or sol (March 27, 2004). At that point in its primary mission, Spirit was investigating a rock called "Mazatzal" on the rim of "Bonneville Crater." The image shows rocky terrain surrounding the crater. The rover had to pick its way through that terrain on its way to the "Columbia Hills," in the distance on the left. Rolling terrain is apparent in the mid-distance. Barely visible to the right of the hills is the outline of the distant rim of Gusev Crater.

This View is presented as cylindrical-perspective projection. It combines images from the left and right eyes of the panoramic camera, taken through blue filters on both sides.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (99 kB) | Large (2.3 MB)
 
Eyeing the Drive Ahead After 'Bonneville' (3-D)
Eyeing the Drive Ahead After 'Bonneville' (3-D)

This stereo view was taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the rover's 87th martian day, or sol (April 1, 2004), just after Spirit left "Bonneville Crater." It shows the terrain to be covered in the trek towards the "Columbia Hills" in the background. Barely visible to the right of the hills is the outline of the distant rim of Gusev Crater.

This image is a stereo anaglyph in cylindrical-perspective projection. It combines images from the left and right eyes of the panoramic camera, taken through blue filters on both sides.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (83.8 kB) | Large (2.7 MB)
20-Oct-2004
 
 
'Columbia Hills' in Stereo
'Columbia Hills' in Stereo

While en route to higher ground in the "Columbia Hills," NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree stereo panorama of its surroundings. Because the rover was parked on a steep slope, it was tilted approximately 22 degrees to the west-northwest. This would be similar to tilting your body sideways like a leaning pole and turning your body and head around to survey your surroundings without bending your neck. At one point, you would be looking slightly down. At another point, you would be looking slightly up. In between those two points, your eyes would be slanted at an angle to the horizon. To compensate for this, image processing experts "untilted" the images, so to speak, which makes the martian horizon appear flat but also creates a vertical offset between the left and right eyes. This offset can make it difficult to view a scene like this looking through 3-D glasses because the two sides of the stereo image do not line up perfectly. Tilting your head one way or the other may help to view it more easily.

The highest point visible in this panorama is "Husband Hill," named for space shuttle Columbia Commander Rick Husband. To the right are the rover's tracks through the soil, where it stopped to perform maintenance on its right front wheel in July. In the distance, below the hills, is the floor of Gusev Crater, where Spirit landed Jan. 3, 2004, before traveling more than 3 kilometers (1.8 miles) to reach this point. This vista comprises 188 images taken between Spirit's 213th day, or sol, on Mars to its 223rd sol (Aug. 9 to 19, 2004). Team members at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Cornell University spent several weeks processing images and producing geometric maps to stitch all the images together in this mosaic. The 360-degree view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective map projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (57.6 kB) | Large (1.8 MB)
 
True 3-D View of 'Columbia Hills' from an Angle
True 3-D View of 'Columbia Hills' from an Angle

This mosaic of images from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a panorama of the "Columbia Hills" without any adjustment for rover tilt. When viewed through 3-D glasses, depth is much more dramatic and easier to see, compared with a tilt-adjusted version. This is because stereo views are created by producing two images, one corresponding to the view from the panoramic camera's left-eye camera, the other corresponding to the view from the panoramic camera's right-eye camera. The brain processes the visual input more accurately when the two images do not have any vertical offset. In this view, the vertical alignment is nearly perfect, but the horizon appears to curve because of the rover's tilt (because the rover was parked on a steep slope, it was tilted approximately 22 degrees to the west-northwest). Spirit took the images for this 360-degree panorama while en route to higher ground in the "Columbia Hills."

The highest point visible in the hills is "Husband Hill," named for space shuttle Columbia Commander Rick Husband. To the right are the rover's tracks through the soil, where it stopped to perform maintenance on its right front wheel in July. In the distance, below the hills, is the floor of Gusev Crater, where Spirit landed Jan. 3, 2004, before traveling more than 3 kilometers (1.8 miles) to reach this point. This vista comprises 188 images taken by Spirit's panoramic camera from its 213th day, or sol, on Mars to its 223rd sol (Aug. 9 to 19, 2004). Team members at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Cornell University spent several weeks processing images and producing geometric maps to stitch all the images together in this mosaic. The 360-degree view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective map projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (461 kB) | Large (11.6 MB)
19-Oct-2004
 
 
Full-Circle View from Near 'Tetl' (3-D)
Full-Circle View from Near 'Tetl' (3-D)

This stereo, 360-degree view combines frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 271st martian day, or sol, on Oct. 7, 2004. The rover had just driven into position for using the tools on its robotic arm (not in the picture) to examine a layered rock called "Tetl" in the "Columbia Hills." Spirit's total driving distance from its landing to this point was 3,641 meters (2.26 miles), more than six times the distance set as a criterion for mission success. This three-dimensional view is presented here in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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07-Oct-2004
 
 
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (3-D)
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (3-D)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit looked up at the "Columbia Hills" from its location on the 265th martian day, or sol, of its mission (Sept. 30, 2004) and captured this 3-D view. This cropped mosaic image, presented here in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction, was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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24-Sep-2004
 
Sampling Martian Soil (3-D)
Sampling Martian Soil (3-D)

Scientists were using the Mössbauer spectrometer on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit when something unexpected happened. The instrument's contact ring had been placed onto the ground as a reference point for placement of another instrument, the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, for analyzing the soil. After Spirit removed the Mössbauer from the target, the rover's microscopic imager revealed a gap in the imprint left behind in the soil. The gap, about a centimeter wide (less than half an inch), is visible on the left side of this stereo view. Scientists concluded that a small chunk of soil probably adhered to the contact ring on the front surface of the Mössbauer. Before anyone saw that soil may have adhered to the Mössbauer, that instrument was placed to analyze martian dust collected by a magnet on the rover. The team plans to take images to see if any soil is still attached to the Mössbauer. Spirit took these images on the rover's 240th martian day, or sol (Sept. 4, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS
Browse Image | Medium Image (1.2 MB) | Large (3.7 MB)
03-Sep-2004
 
Preparing for 'Lights Out' on Mars (3-D)
Preparing for 'Lights Out' on Mars (3-D)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit takes a good look around at its surroundings high above Gusev Crater as mission planners prepare for solar conjunction on sol 244 (Sept. 9, 2004). On this day, and over the next 11 days, the rover will be out of reach as the Sun moves between Earth and Mars, blocking communications. Scientists are currently discussing potential light-duty assignments that may involve taking images of surrounding terrain, recording wind patterns in the dust, or completing scientific analysis of dust collected on the rover's magnets. Otherwise, Spirit will essentially be on vacation until sol 255 (Sept. 20, 2004). Dominating the left side of this image, to the east, is the high point of the "West Spur" region of the "Columbia Hills," where Spirit has been exploring rock outcrops since June. On the right side, northwest of the rover's present location, are Spirit's tracks leading up the slope. Dark areas show wheel tracks created when Spirit slipped a bit while negotiating the outcrops. Beyond that, sand dunes on the floor of Gusev Crater can be seen. About one-third of the way across the image from the right is the outcrop dubbed "Longhorn," above the rock dubbed "Clovis," where Spirit used its rock abrasion tool to grind the deepest hole to date on Mars. Just to the left of the middle of this image, a short distance beneath the summit, is a rock outcrop slanting to the left, or north. Spirit will spend the depth of the martian winter there with its solar panels oriented toward the Sun. Spirit's navigation camera took the images that make up this mosaic from a position labeled Site 86 on sols 228 to 230 (Aug. 23 to Aug. 25, 2004). The three-dimensional, 360-degree view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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11-Aug-2004
 
 
Making Tracks on Mars (3-D)
Making Tracks on Mars (3-D)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has been making tracks on Mars for seven months now, well beyond its original 90-day mission. The rover traveled more than 3 kilometers (2 miles) to reach the "Columbia Hills" pictured here. In this 3-D, 360-degree view of the rolling martian terrain, its wheel tracks can be seen approaching from the northwest (right side of image).

Spirit's navigation camera took the images that make up this mosaic on sols 210 and 213 (Aug. 5 and Aug. 8, 2004). The rover is now conducting scientific studies of the local geology on the "Clovis" outcrop of the "West Spur" region of the "Columbia Hills." The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction. Scientists plan for Spirit to take a color panoramic image from this location.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (606 kB) | Large (11.1 MB)
 
An Outcrop with a View (3-D)
An Outcrop with a View (3-D)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit created this 3-D, 360-degree view of the rolling martian terrain at "Columbia Hills" on sol 204 (July 30, 2004), after traveling more than 3 kilometers (2 miles) across the plains of the 165-kilometer-wide (103-mile-wide) Gusev Crater. This mosaic was created from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (602 kB) | Large (6.5 MB)
30-Jul-2004
 
High on 'West Spur' (3-D)
High on 'West Spur' (3-D)

In this stereo image, a rock outcrop with a view of the surrounding landscape beckons NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 203 (July 29, 2004) of its journey of exploration on the red planet. This view is a mosaic of images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position labeled as Site 80, near the top of the "West Spur" portion of the "Columbia Hills." Directly ahead are rock outcrops that scientists will examine for clues that might indicate the presence of water in the past. In the upper right-hand corner is the so-called "sea of basalt," consisting of lava flows that lapped onto the flanks of the hills. The view is toward the south. The field of view is approximately 170 degrees from right to left and is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (170 kB) | Large (6.2 MB)
22-Jul-2004
 
 
Spirit's View on Sol 189 (3-D)
Hilly Surroundings (3-D)

This 360-degree stereo anaglyph of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was taken on the rover's 189th sol on Mars (July 15, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as Site 72, which is at the base of the "West Spur" portion of the "Columbia Hills." The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (324 kB) | Large (9.2 MB)
17-Jun-2004
 
'Cobra Hoods' Coming At You
'Cobra Hoods' Coming At You

This 3-D image taken by the left and right eyes of the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the odd rock formation dubbed "Cobra Hoods" (center). Rover scientists say this resistant rock is unlike anything they've seen on Mars so far. Spirit will investigate the rock in coming sols. The stereo pictures making up this image were captured on sol 156 (June 11, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (42 kB) | Large (393 kB)
15-Jun-2004
 
 
The Columbia Hills at Last!
The Columbia Hills at Last!

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the images that make up this 360-degree mosaic anaglyph with its navigation camera on sol 156 (June 11, 2004). The image, projected at a cylindrical perspective, highlights Spirit's arrival at the base of the Columbia Hills. Since landing at Gusev crater, Spirit has put more than 3.4 kilometers (2.1 miles) on its odometer. Much of this can be attributed to the long drives the rover had to undertake to reach these interesting landforms.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (433 kB) | Large (5 MB)
10-Jun-2004
 
 
Spiritís Shadow, Sol 153 (3-D)
Spiritís Shadow, Sol 153 (3-D)

This cylindrical-perspective stereo mosaic was created from navigation camera images acquired by NASAís Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during Spirit's sol 153, on June 8, 2004. Spirit is pointing toward the base of the "Columbia Hills."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (137 kB) | Large (2.7 MB)
 
Spirit Tracks on Mars, Sol 151 (3-D)
Spirit Tracks on Mars, Sol 151 (3-D)

This stereo view of a full 360-degree panorama in Mars' Gusev Crater region was assembled from frames taken by the navigation camera on NASAís Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during Spirit's 151st martian day, or sol, on June 5, 2004. The view is presented in a cylidrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The rover sits at site 63, still more than 100 meters (328 feet) from the base of the "Columbia Hills." As suggested by the rover tracks fading off in the distance, Spirit made great progress on this sol, roving 73 meters (240 feet) to get to this point.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (423 kB) | Large (8.6 MB)
03-Jun-2004
 
 
Spirit's View on Sol 142 (3-D)
Spirit's View on Sol 142 (3-D)

This 360-degree stereo anaglyph of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the 142nd martian day of the rover's mission inside Gusev Crater, on May 27, 2004, was assembled from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The rover's position is Site A55. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (383 kB) | Large (3.2 MB)
 
Spirit's View on Sol 147 (3-D)
Spirit's View on Sol 147 (3-D)

This 360-degree stereo anaglyph of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the 147th martian day of the rover's mission inside Gusev Crater, on June 1, 2004, was assembled from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The rover's position is Site A60. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (389 kB) | Large (7.3 MB)
 
Spirit's View on Sol 148 (3-D)
Spirit's View on Sol 148 (3-D)

This 360-degree stereo anaglyph of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the 148th martian day of the rover's mission inside Gusev Crater, on June 2, 2004, was assembled from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The rover's position is Site A61. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (440 kB) | Large (8.3 MB)
02-Jun-2004
 
 
Lahontan Crater Looms
Lahontan Crater Looms

This cylindrical-projection 120-degree image mosaic was created from three navigation camera images that NASAís Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 120 (May 5, 2004). The image highlights a crater approximately 70 meters (230 feet) in diameter that scientists have informally named "Lahontan." This image also reveals a wind-ripple feature in the foreground and a distant look at the Columbia Hills on the Horizon, Spirit's planned final destination.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (135 kB) | Large (3 MB)
14-May-2004
 
 
The Road Less Traveled (3-D)
The Road Less Traveled (3-D)

This three-dimensional view in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 127 (May 12, 2004). Spirit is sitting at site 48. The tracks show the path the rover has traveled so far on its way to the base of the "Columbia Hills." In this image, the hills can be seen silhouetted against the horizon on the far left side. Spirit will reach the base of the hills by sol 160.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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11-May-2004
 
 
Spirit Keeps on Trekking (3-D)
Spirit Keeps on Trekking (3-D)

This three-dimensional view in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 121 (May 6, 2004). Continuing its trek toward the "Columbia Hills," Spirit drove 96.8 meters (318 feet) - half of which was performed in auto-navigation mode - and broke its record for the longest distance traveled in one sol. That drive brought the mission total to 1,669 meters (1.04 miles), flipping the rover's odometer over the one-mile mark.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (408 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
 
Spirit Heads Toward History (3-D)
Spirit Heads Toward History (3-D)

This three-dimensional view in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 122 (May 7,2004). Spirit is sitting at site 43. The rover is on its way to the "Columbia Hills," which can be seen on the horizon. Spirit will spend the next 37 sols or more journeying to the base of these hills with the goal of learning more about Gusev Crater's past.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (364 kB) | Large (7.4 MB)
 
Spirit's View on Sol 123 (3-D)
Spirit's View on Sol 123 (3-D)

This three-dimensional view in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 123 (May 8, 2004). Spirit is sitting at site 44. The rover is on the way to the "Columbia Hills," which can be seen on the horizon. To this point, Spirit has driven a total of 1,830 meters (1.14 miles). The hills are less than 1.6 kilometers (1 mile) away, and the rover might reach them by mid-June.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (415 kB) | Large (8.4 MB)
 
Spiritís View on Sol 124 (3-D)
Spiritís View on Sol 124 (3-D)

This three-dimensional view in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 124 (May 9, 2004). It reveals Spiritís view as it gets closer to the ďColumbia Hills.Ē

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (357 kB) | Large (3.5 MB)
26-Apr-2004
 
 
Spirit's View on Sol 107 in 3-D
Spirit's View on Sol 107 in 3-D

This three-dimensional, cylindrical-perspective projection was assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 107 (April 21, 2004) at a region dubbed "site 32." Spirit is sitting east of "Missoula Crater," no longer in the crater's ejecta field, but on outer plains. Since landing, Spirit has traveled almost exclusively over ejecta fields. This new landscape looks different with fewer angular rocks and more rounded, vesicle-filled rocks. Spirit will continue another 1,900 meters (1.18 miles) along this terrain before reaching the western base of the "Columbia Hills."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (318 kB) | Large (7 MB)
 
Spirit's View on Sol 110 in 3-D
Spirit's View on Sol 110 in 3-D

This three-dimensional, cylindrical-perspective projection was assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 110 (April 24, 2004) at a region dubbed "site 35." Spirit is sitting approximately 33 meters (100 feet) away from the northeast rim of "Missoula" crater.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (274 kB) | Large (6.3 MB)
20-Apr-2004
 
 
Spirit's View on Sol 93 (3-D)

This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 93 (April 7, 2004). It reveals the martian view from Spirit's position during the four-sol flight software update that began on sol 94.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (347 kB) | Large (7 MB)
 
Spirit's View on Sol 100 (3-D)

This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 100 (April 14, 2004). It reveals Spirit's view after a century of sols on the martian surface.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (304 kB) | Large (7.1 MB)
 
Spirit's View on Sol 101 (3-D)
Spirit's View on Sol 101 (3-D)

This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 101 (April 15, 2004). It reveals Spirit's view just before a stopping-point dubbed "Missoula Crater." The rover is on its way to the "Columbia Hills."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (256 kB) | Large (6.5 MB)
29-Mar-2004
 
 
What Lies Ahead (3-D)
What Lies Ahead (3-D)

This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed "Bonneville." The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed "Mazatzal" and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as "Site 22, Position 32." This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (715 kB) | Large (5.7 MB)
17-Mar-2004
 
 
Almost Like Being at 'Bonneville'
Almost Like Being at 'Bonneville'

The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this 3-D navigation camera mosaic of the crater nicknamed "Bonneville" on the 67th martian day, or sol, of its mission. The rover's solar panels can be seen in the foreground, and just above the far crater rim, on the left side, is the rover's heatshield, which is visible as a tiny reflective speck.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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12-Mar-2004
 
 
'Bonneville' in 3-D!
'Bonneville' in 3-D!

The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this 3-D navigation camera mosaic Of the crater called "Bonneville" after driving approximately 13 meters (42.7 feet) to get a better vantage point. Spirit's current position is close enough to the edge to see the interior of the crater, but high enough and far enough back to get a view of all of the walls. Because scientists and rover controllers are so pleased with this location, they will stay here for at least two more martian days, or sols, to take high resolution panoramic camera images of "Bonneville" in its entirety. Just above the far crater rim, on the left side, is the rover's heatshield, which is visible as a tiny reflective speck.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (101 kB) | Large (779 kB)
26-Feb-2004
 
Ripples or Dunes?
Ripples or Dunes?

This approximate true-color image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's panoramic camera shows the windblown waves of soil that characterize the rocky surface of Gusev Crater, Mars. Scientists were puzzled about whether these geologic features were "ripples" or "dunes." Ripples are shaped by gentle winds that deposit coarse grains on the tops or crests of the waves. Dunes are carved by faster winds and contain a more uniform distribution of material. Images taken of these features by the rover's microscopic imager on the 41st martian sol, or day, of the rover's mission revealed their identity to be ripples. This information helps scientists better understand the winds that shape the landscape of Mars. This image was taken early in Spirit's mission.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (47 kB) | Large (642 kB)
Are They Telltale Ripples?
Are They Telltale Ripples?

This false-color image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's panoramic camera shows peak-like formations on the martian terrain at Gusev Crater. Scientists have been analyzing these formations, which have coarse particles accumulating on their tops, or crests. This characteristic classifies them as ripples instead of dunes, which have a more uniform distribution of particle sizes. Scientists are looking further into such formations, which can give insight to the wind direction and velocity on Mars, as well as the material that is being moved by the wind. This image was taken on the 40th martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (84 kB) | Large (1.4 MB)
10-Feb-2004
 
Ripples in The Soil
Ripples in The Soil

This is a three-dimensional stereo anaglyph of an image taken by the front navigation camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, showing an interesting patch of rippled soil. Spirit took this image on sol 37 (Feb. 9, 2004) after completing the longest drive ever made by a rover on another planet - 21.2 meters (69.6 feet). On sol 38 scientists plan to investigate this interesting location with the microscopic imager and Mössbauer spectrometer on Spirit's instrument deployment device.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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23-Jan-2004
 
On Its Own
On Its Own

This 3-D image combines computer-generated models of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit and its lander with real surface data from the rover's panoramic camera. It shows Spirit's position just after it rolled off the lander on Jan. 15, 2004.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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19-Jan-2004
 
Approaching Rock Target No. 1
Approaching Rock Target No. 1

This 3-D stereo anaglyph image was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit front hazard-avoidance camera after the rover's first post-egress drive on Mars Sunday. Engineers drove the rover approximately 3 meters (10 feet) from the Columbia Memorial Station toward the first rock target, seen in the foreground. The football-sized rock was dubbed Adirondack because of its mountain-shaped appearance. Scientists plan to use instruments at the end of the rover's robotic arm to examine the rock and understand how it formed.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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16-Jan-2004
 
Martian Soil in 3-D
Martian Soil in 3-D

This image taken by the microscopic imager on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the powdery soil of Mars in 3-D. It is the sharpest look yet at the surface of another planet. The microscopic imager is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or "arm."

Image credit: NASA/JPL/US Geological Survey
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15-Jan-2004
 
Spirit Looks Back (3-D)
Spirit Looks Back

This 3-D anaglyph made from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's rear hazard-avoidance camera shows the rover's hind view of the lander platform, its nest for the past 12 sols, or martian days. The rover is approximately 1 meter (3 feet) in front of the airbag-cushioned lander, facing northwest. Note the tracks left in the martian soil by the rovers' wheels, all six of which have rolled off the lander. This is the first time the rover has touched martian soil.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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10-Jan-2004
 
 
Martian Landscape in 3-D
Martian Landscape in 3-D

This 3-D stereo image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's navigation camera shows the rover's lander and, in the background, the surrounding martian terrain.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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07-Jan-2004
 
Mars in Stereo
Mars in Stereo

This image shows the martian terrain in 3-D. The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured the image with its two high-resolution stereo panoramic cameras.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Shrouded in Dust
Shrouded in Dust

Dust-covered rocks can be seen in this portion of the 3-D image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. Scientists plan to use the rover's rock abrasion tool to grind away dusty and weathered rock, exposing fresh rock underneath.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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05-Jan-2004
 
 
First 3-D Panorama of Spirit's Landing Site
First 3-D Panorama of Spirit's Landing Site

This sprawling look at the martian landscape surrounding the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is the first 3-D stereo image from the rover's navigation camera. A surface depression nicknamed "Sleepy Hollow" can be seen to center left of the image. Scientists theorize that this topographic feature, measuring about 10 meters (30 feet) in diameter and located approximately 10 to 20 meters (30 to 60 feet) away from Spirit, is either an impact crater or a product of wind erosion.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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