NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology JPL HOME EARTH SOLAR SYSTEM STARS & GALAXIES SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY JPL Email News RSS Mobile Video
Follow this link to skip to the main content
JPL banner - links to JPL and CalTech
left nav graphic Overview Science Technology The Mission People Spotlights Events Multimedia All Mars
Mars for Kids
Mars for Students
Mars for Educators
Mars for Press
+ Mars Home
+ Rovers Home
Multimedia
Summary
Images
Press Release Images
Spirit
Opportunity
All Raw Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Panoramas
Spirit
Opportunity
3-D Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Special-Effects Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Spacecraft
Mars Artwork
Landing Sites
Videos
Podcasts
Panoramas: Opportunity
2004   |   2005   |   2006   |   2007   |   2008   |   2009
2010   |   2011   |   2012   |   2013   |   2014   |   2015
13-Dec-2004
 
 
'Burns Cliff' Color Panorama
'Burns Cliff' Color Panorama

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured this view of "Burns Cliff" after driving right to the base of this southeastern portion of the inner wall of "Endurance Crater." The view combines frames taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera between the rover's 287th and 294th martian days (Nov. 13 to 20, 2004).

This is a composite of 46 different images, each acquired in seven different Pancam filters. It is an approximately true-color rendering generated from the panoramic camera's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters. The mosaic spans more than 180 degrees side to side. Because of this wide-angle view, the cliff walls appear to bulge out toward the camera. In reality the walls form a gently curving, continuous surface.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (881 kB) | Large (38.5 MB)
 
Clouds over 'Endurance' on Sol 290
Clouds over 'Endurance' on Sol 290

Clouds add drama to the sky above "Endurance Crater" in this mosaic of frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at about 9:30 a.m. on the rover's 290th sol (Nov. 16, 2004). The view spans an arc from east on the left to the southwest on the right.

These clouds are part of a band that forms near the equator when Mars is near the part of its orbit that is farthest from the Sun. For Opportunity (and Spirit and the rest of the southern hemisphere), this occurs in late fall and early winter. During this period, atmospheric temperatures and the amount of water vapor combine to form large-scale clouds. These clouds look like Earth's cirrus clouds and share other similarities with cirrus clouds in that they are believed to be composed entirely of water-ice particles with sizes on the order of several micrometers (a few ten-thousandths of an inch).

The images that are combined to produce this view have been processed to remove geometrical distortion associated with the camera's 45-degree field of view. In addition, special image processing has been applied to enhance the clouds and make them visible across the entire mosaic. The rim of Endurance was processed using the same technique, illustrating how much enhancement was done. Glare from the Sun washed out the clouds on the left in the original images; this glare was removed.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (56.7 kB) | Large (480 kB)
 
Clouds over 'Endurance' on Sol 291
Clouds over 'Endurance' on Sol 291

Clouds appear in the martian sky above "Endurance Crater" in this mosaic of frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the morning of the rover's 291st sol (Nov. 17, 2004). The view spans an arc from the east on the left to the southwest on the right.

Opportunity has observed differences in cloudiness from one sol to the next, a reminder that Mars, like Earth, has daily weather as well as longer-term seasonal changes.

The images that are combined to produce this view have been processed to remove geometrical distortion associated with the camera's 45-degree field of view. In addition, special image processing has been applied to the original images to enhance the clouds and make them visible across the entire mosaic. Glare from the Sun washed out the clouds on the left in the original images; this glare was removed. The left-most image in this mosaic contains some artifacts from pointing the camera toward the Sun. The rim of Endurance has been processed separately and merged back with the sky to better show the context.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (53.7 kB) | Large (530 kB)
02-Dec-2004
 
 
No Shortcut for Opportunity (3-D)
No Shortcut for Opportunity (3-D)

As NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was making its way back toward its original entry path into "Endurance Crater," scientists and engineers spotted what they hoped might be a shortcut for climbing out of the crater. The possible exit path, pictured on the far right of this image where the outcrop is punctuated, was eventually deemed too hazardous for the rover to attempt. Opportunity would have had to cross terrain with a slope of 28 degrees and face a tall rock outcropping very close to the exit chute opening which, itself, is too narrow for the rover to pass. This stereo view combines several frames taken by the rover's navigation camera during Opportunity's 297th sol on Mars (Nov. 24, 2004). It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The location from which the image was taken has been designated as Opportunity's Site 38, Position 97.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (435 kB) | Large (2.9 MB)
 
No Shortcut for Opportunity
No Shortcut for Opportunity

As NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was making its way back toward its original entry path into "Endurance Crater," scientists and engineers spotted what they hoped might be a shortcut for climbing out of the crater. The possible exit path, pictured on the far right of this image where the outcrop is punctuated, was eventually deemed too hazardous for the rover to attempt. Opportunity would have had to cross terrain with a slope of 28 degrees and face a tall rock outcropping very close to the exit chute opening which, itself, is too narrow for the rover to pass. This view combines several frames taken by the rover's navigation camera during Opportunity's 297th sol on Mars (Nov. 24, 2004). It is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction. The location from which the image was taken has been designated as Opportunity's Site 38, Position 97.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (310 kB) | Large (2.3 MB)
 
No Shortcut for Opportunity (Left Eye)
No Shortcut for Opportunity (Left Eye)

As NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was making its way back toward its original entry path into "Endurance Crater," scientists and engineers spotted what they hoped might be a shortcut for climbing out of the crater. The possible exit path, pictured on the far right of this image where the outcrop is punctuated, was eventually deemed too hazardous for the rover to attempt. Opportunity would have had to cross terrain with a slope of 28 degrees and face a tall rock outcropping very close to the exit chute opening which, itself, is too narrow for the rover to pass. This view combines several frames taken by the rover's navigation camera during Opportunity's 297th sol on Mars (Nov. 24, 2004). It is the left-eye member of a stereo pair presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The location from which the image was taken has been designated as Opportunity's Site 38, Position 97.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (324 kB) | Large (2 MB)
 
No Shortcut for Opportunity (Right Eye)
No Shortcut for Opportunity (Right Eye)

As NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was making its way back toward its original entry path into "Endurance Crater," scientists and engineers spotted what they hoped might be a shortcut for climbing out of the crater. The possible exit path, pictured on the far right of this image where the outcrop is punctuated, was eventually deemed too hazardous for the rover to attempt. Opportunity would have had to cross terrain with a slope of 28 degrees and face a tall rock outcropping very close to the exit chute opening which, itself, is too narrow for the rover to pass. This view combines several frames taken by the rover's navigation camera during Opportunity's 297th sol on Mars (Nov. 24, 2004). It is the right-eye member of a stereo pair presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The location from which the image was taken has been designated as Opportunity's Site 38, Position 97.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (323 kB) | Large (2 MB)
23-Nov-2004
 
 
Opportunity at the Wall (Vertical)
Opportunity at the Wall (Vertical)

The navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity took images during the rover's 285th martian day (Nov. 11, 2004) that are combined into this 360-degree panorama. Opportunity had reached the base of "Burns Cliff," a portion of the inner wall of "Endurance Crater." This view shows rock layers in the wall. The rover's position when taking the images was labeled Opportunity site 37, position 550. This view is presented in a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (419 kB) | Large (17.2 MB)
 
Opportunity at the Wall (Cylindrical)
Opportunity at the Wall (Cylindrical)

The navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity took images during the rover's 285th martian day (Nov. 11, 2004) that are combined into this 360-degree panorama. Opportunity had reached the base of "Burns Cliff," a portion of the inner wall of "Endurance Crater." This view shows rock layers in the wall, with a portion of Opportunity's solar array visible at the bottom right. The rover's position when taking the images was labeled Opportunity site 37, position 550. This view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (345 kB) | Large (3.4 MB)
 
Opportunity at the Wall (Right Eye)
Opportunity at the Wall (Right Eye)

The navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity took images during the rover's 285th martian day (Nov. 11, 2004) that are combined into this 360-degree panorama. Opportunity had reached the base of "Burns Cliff," a portion of the inner wall of "Endurance Crater." This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair. It shows rock layers in the wall, with a portion of Opportunity's solar array visible at the bottom right. The rover's position when taking the images was labeled Opportunity site 37, position 550. This view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (427 kB) | Large (4.4 MB)
 
Opportunity at the Wall (Polar)
Opportunity at the Wall (Polar)

The navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity took images during the rover's 285th martian day (Nov. 11, 2004) that are combined into this 360-degree panorama. Opportunity had reached the base of "Burns Cliff," a portion of the inner wall of "Endurance Crater." This view shows rock layers in the wall. The rover's position when taking the images was labeled Opportunity site 37, position 550. This view is presented in a polar projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (371 kB) | Large (5.2 MB)
22-Nov-2004
 
 
Opportunity at the Wall
Opportunity at the Wall (Left Eye)

The navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity took images during the rover's 285th martian day (Nov. 11, 2004) that are combined into this 360-degree panorama. Opportunity had reached the base of "Burns Cliff," a portion of the inner wall of "Endurance Crater." This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair. It shows rock layers in the wall, with a portion of Opportunity's solar array visible at the bottom right. The rover's position when taking the images was labeled Opportunity site 37, position 550. This view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (422 kB) | Large (6.2 MB)
 
Opportunity at the Wall (3-D)
Opportunity at the Wall (3-D)

The navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity took images during the rover's 285th martian day (Nov. 11, 2004) that are combined into this stereo panorama. Opportunity had reached the base of "Burns Cliff," a portion of the inner wall of "Endurance Crater." This view shows rock layers in the wall, with a portion of Opportunity's solar array visible at the bottom right.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (557 kB) | Large (6.5 MB)
15-Nov-2004
 
 
Along Crater's Inner Wall
Along Crater's Inner Wall

This view from the base of "Burns Cliff" in the inner wall of "Endurance Crater" combines several frames taken by Opportunity's navigation camera during the NASA rover's 280th martian day (Nov. 6, 2004). It is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction. The cliff dominates the left and right portions of the image, while the central portion looks down into the crater. The "U" shape of this mosaic results from the rover's tilt of about 30 degrees on the sloped ground below the cliff. Rover wheel tracks in the left half of the image show some of the slippage the rover experienced in making its way to this point. The site from which this image was taken has been designated as Opportunity's Site 37.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (338 kB) | Large (3.6 MB)
 
Along Crater's Inner Wall (3-D)
Along Crater's Inner Wall (3-D)

This stereo view from the base of "Burns Cliff" in the inner wall of "Endurance Crater" combines several frames taken by Opportunity's navigation camera during the NASA rover's 280th martian day (Nov. 6, 2004). It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The cliff dominates the left and right portions of the image, while the central portion looks down into the crater. The "U" shape of this mosaic results from the rover's tilt of about 30 degrees on the sloped ground below the cliff. Rover wheel tracks in the left half of the image show some of the slippage the rover experienced in making its way to this point. The site from which this image was taken has been designated as Opportunity's Site 37.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (510 kB) | Large (5 MB)
 
Along Crater's Inner Wall (Left Eye)
Along Crater's Inner Wall (Left Eye)

This view from the base of "Burns Cliff" in the inner wall of "Endurance Crater" combines several frames taken by Opportunity's navigation camera during the NASA rover's 280th martian day (Nov. 6, 2004). It is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The cliff dominates the left and right portions of the image, while the central portion looks down into the crater. The "U" shape of this mosaic results from the rover's tilt of about 30 degrees on the sloped ground below the cliff. Rover wheel tracks in the left half of the image show some of the slippage the rover experienced in making its way to this point. The site from which this image was taken has been designated as Opportunity's Site 37.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (400 kB) | Large (4.3 MB)
 
Along Crater's Inner Wall (Right Eye)
Along Crater's Inner Wall (Right Eye)

This view from the base of "Burns Cliff" in the inner wall of "Endurance Crater" combines several frames taken by Opportunity's navigation camera during the NASA rover's 280th martian day (Nov. 6, 2004). It is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The cliff dominates the left and right portions of the image, while the central portion looks down into the crater. The "U" shape of this mosaic results from the rover's tilt of about 30 degrees on the sloped ground below the cliff. Rover wheel tracks in the left half of the image show some of the slippage the rover experienced in making its way to this point. The site from which this image was taken has been designated as Opportunity's Site 37.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (399 kB) | Large (4.3 MB)
 
Along Crater's Inner Wall (Polar)
Along Crater's Inner Wall (Polar)

This view from the base of "Burns Cliff" in the inner wall of "Endurance Crater" combines several frames taken by Opportunity's navigation camera during the NASA rover's 280th martian day (Nov. 6, 2004). It is presented in a polar projection with geometric seam correction. Rover wheel tracks in the left half of the image show some of the slippage the rover experienced in making its way to this point. The site from which this image was taken has been designated as Opportunity's Site 37.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (671 kB) | Large (4.3 MB)
30-Sept-2004
 
 
Busy at the Bottom of 'Endurance Crater'
Busy at the Bottom of 'Endurance Crater'

This mosaic from the navigation camera aboard NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was compiled from images taken on the rover's 193rd and 194th sol on Mars (August 9 and 10, 2004). The rover's current work area near the bottom of "Endurance Crater" is featured in this image. In coming sols, Opportunity will make its way toward the interesting rock, "Wopmay," located on the far right of this image, on the crater's inner slopes just beneath "Burns Cliff." Scientists say the rock's unusual texture is unlike any others observed so far at Meridiani Planum. Wopmay measures approximately 1 meter (3.3 feet) across. This image is presented in a cylindrical projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (426 kB) | Large (2.4 MB)
 
Busy at the Bottom of 'Endurance Crater' (left eye)
Busy at the Bottom of 'Endurance Crater' (left eye)

This mosaic from the navigation camera aboard NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was compiled from images taken on the rover's 193rd and 194th sol on Mars (August 9 and 10, 2004). The rover's current work area near the bottom of "Endurance Crater" is featured in this image. In coming sols, Opportunity will make its way toward the interesting rock, "Wopmay," located on the far right of this image, on the crater's inner slopes just beneath "Burns Cliff." Scientists say the rock's unusual texture is unlike any others observed so far at Meridiani Planum. Wopmay measures approximately 1 meter (3.3 feet) across. This image is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction. It the left-eye half of a stereo pair.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (506 kB) | Large (2.7 MB)
 
Busy at the Bottom of 'Endurance Crater' (right eye)
Busy at the Bottom of 'Endurance Crater' (right eye)

This mosaic from the navigation camera aboard NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was compiled from images taken on the rover's 193rd and 194th sol on Mars (August 9 and 10, 2004). The rover's current work area near the bottom of "Endurance Crater" is featured in this image. In coming sols, Opportunity will make its way toward the interesting rock, "Wopmay," located on the far right of this image, on the crater's inner slopes just beneath "Burns Cliff." Scientists say the rock's unusual texture is unlike any others observed so far at Meridiani Planum. Wopmay measures approximately 1 meter (3.3 feet) across. This image is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction. It is the right-eye half of a stereo pair.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (448 kB) | Large (2.7 MB)
16-Sept-2004
 
 
'Endurance' Untouched
'Endurance' Untouched

This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of "Endurance Crater." The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through the martian atmosphere. The 360-degree view is presented in a cylindrical projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (287 kB) | Large (3.7 MB)
 
'Endurance' Untouched (3-D)
'Endurance' Untouched (3-D)

This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of "Endurance Crater." The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through the martian atmosphere. The 360-degree, stereo view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (386 kB) | Large (8 MB)
 
'Endurance' Untouched (left eye)
'Endurance' Untouched (left eye)

This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of "Endurance Crater." The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through the martian atmosphere. The 360-degree view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction. This is the left-eye view of a stereo pair.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (290 kB) | Large (3.9 MB)
 
'Endurance' Untouched (right eye)
'Endurance' Untouched (right eye)

This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of "Endurance Crater." The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through the martian atmosphere. The 360-degree view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction. This is the right-eye view of a stereo pair.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (289 kB) | Large (4 MB)
18-Aug-2004
 
 
Drilling Holes Line Opportunity's Path
Drilling Holes Line Opportunity's Path

This image composite shows 11 holes dug by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rock abrasion tool into the slopes of "Endurance Crater." The main panoramic camera image highlights more recently made holes (yellow) and the rover's path into the crater (pink). The navigation camera image to the right shows the first seven holes drilled into Endurance. Each hole is 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (325 kB) | Large (1.4 MB)
10-Aug-2004
 
 
New Look at 'Endurance' via Mars Express
New Look at 'Endurance' via Mars Express

This view of the interior slope and rim of "Endurance Crater" comes from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity with an assist from the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter. Opportunity took the three frames that make up this image on the rover's 188th martian day (Aug. 4, 2004), before transmitting this and other data to Mars Express. The orbiter then relayed the data to Earth. Rover wheel tracks are visible in the foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (45.7 kB) | Large (954 kB)
21-Jul-2004
 
 
Opportunity's View on Sol 171
'Endurance' All Around (cylindrical)

This 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was taken on the rover's 171st sol on Mars (July 17, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as "site 33." Opportunity had driven 11 meters (36 feet) into "Endurance Crater." The view is a cylindrical projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (419 kB) | Large (6.4 MB)
 
Opportunity's View on Sol 171 (3-D)
'Endurance' All Around (3-D)

This 360-degree stereo anaglyph of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was taken on the rover's 171st sol on Mars (July 17, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as "site 33." Opportunity had driven 11 meters (36 feet) into "Endurance Crater." The view is a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (688 kB) | Large (8 MB)
 
Opportunity's View on Sol 171 (Left-Eye)
'Endurance' All Around (left-eye)

This is the left-eye view of a stereo pair showing the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on the rover's 171st sol on Mars (July 17, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as "site 33." Opportunity had driven 11 meters (36 feet) into "Endurance Crater." The 360-degree view is a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (506 kB) | Large (7.7 MB)
 
Opportunity's View on Sol 171 (Right-Eye)
'Endurance' All Around (right-eye)

This is the right-eye view of a stereo pair showing the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on the rover's 171st sol on Mars (July 17, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as "site 33." Opportunity had driven 11 meters (36 feet) into "Endurance Crater." The 360-degree view is a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (512 kB) | Large (7.3 MB)
12-Jul-2004
 
 
Clouds Roll in for Martian Winter
Clouds Roll in for Martian Winter

Using its left navigation camera, the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity sought to capture some clouds on its 153rd sol on Mars (June 28, 2004). The presence of morning clouds in the area of Endurance Crater was established by spacecraft orbiting Mars. Mars has three kinds of clouds: dust clouds low in the atmosphere; water clouds near the surface up to heights of 20 kilometers (about 12 miles); and carbon dioxide clouds at very high altitudes.

Just as on Earth, clouds, especially water clouds, are good tracers of the weather. Based on orbital data, more clouds are expected during the martian winter. As this change occurs, the rover's cameras and miniature thermal emission spectrometer will track other changes that occur as the clouds accumulate.

The rovers provide a unique opportunity to examine the lower portion of Mars' atmosphere. The lower atmosphere is difficult to characterize from orbit, but it is critical because that is where the atmosphere interacts with the surface. Since the rovers landed, the science team has been using the rover's miniature thermal emission spectrometer instrument to see the weather at this bottom layer.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (31 kB) | Large (118 kB)
25-Jun-2004
 
 
'Endurance' Tells Story of Mars' History
'Endurance' Tells Story of Mars' History

This false-color image mosaic shows the area inside "Endurance Crater" that the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been examining. The rover is currently investigating the distinct layers of rock that make up this region. Each layer is defined by subtle color and texture variations and represents a separate chapter in Mars' history. The deeper the layer, the farther back in time the rocks were formed. Scientists are "reading" this history book by systematically studying each layer with the rover's scientific instruments. So far, data from the rover indicates that the top layers are sulfate-rich, like the rocks observed in "Eagle Crater." This image was taken on sol 134 (June 9, 2004) by Opportunity's panoramic camera with the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (90 kB) | Medium Image (459 kB) | Large (4.4 MB)
15-Jun-2004
 
 
Crater of Clues
Crater of Clues

This 360-degree panorama shows "Endurance Crater" and the surrounding plains of Meridiani Planum. This is the second large panoramic camera mosaic of Endurance, and was obtained from a high point near the crater's south rim.

It took seven sols to complete this panorama (sols 117-123), using 81 separate camera positions and six filters per position. The composite shown here is an approximate true-color rendering generated from the panoramic camera's 750-, 530- and 480-nanometer filters. The mosaic, shown at full-resolution, is 22,780 x 2,723 pixels in size.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (238 kB) | Large (26.1 MB)
10-Jun-2004
 
 
Ready to Enter 'Endurance'
Ready to Enter 'Endurance'

This view looking toward the northeast across "Endurance Crater" in Mars' Meridiani Planum region was assembled from frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 131st martian day, or sol, on June 6, 2004. That was two sols before Opportunity entered the crater, taking the route nearly straight ahead in this image into the "Karatepe" area of the crater. This view is a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (490 kB) | Large (3 MB)
 
Ready to Enter 'Endurance'(Stereo)

This stereo anaglyph looking toward the northeast across "Endurance Crater" in Mars' Meridiani Planum region was assembled from frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 131st martian day, or sol, on June 6, 2004. That was two sols before Opportunity entered the crater, taking the route nearly straight ahead in this image into the "Karatepe" area of the crater. This view is a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (838 kB) | Large (7.3 MB)
 
Ready to Enter 'Endurance'(Left Eye)
Ready to Enter 'Endurance'(Left Eye)

This is the left-eye half of a stereo pair of views looking toward the northeast across "Endurance Crater" in Mars' Meridiani Planum region. It was assembled from frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 131st martian day, or sol, on June 6, 2004. That was two sols before Opportunity entered the crater, taking the route nearly straight ahead in this image into the "Karatepe" area of the crater. This view is a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (586 kB) | Large (1.8 MB)
 
Ready to Enter 'Endurance'(Right Eye)
Ready to Enter 'Endurance'(Right Eye)

This is the right-eye half of a stereo pair of views looking toward the northeast across "Endurance Crater" in Mars' Meridiani Planum region. It was assembled from frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 131st martian day, or sol, on June 6, 2004. That was two sols before Opportunity entered the crater, taking the route nearly straight ahead in this image into the "Karatepe" area of the crater. This view is a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (594 kB) | Large (3.7 MB)
08-Jun-2004
 
 
Downward Slope
Downward Slope

This false-color image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity panoramic camera shows a downward view from the rover as it sits at the edge of "Endurance" crater. The gradual, "blueberry"-strewn slope before the rover contains an exposed dark layer of rock that wraps around the upper section of the crater. Scientists suspect that this rock layer will provide clues about Mars' distant past. This mosaic image comprises images taken from 10 rover positions using 750, 530 and 430 nanometer filters, acquired on sol 131 (June 6, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (763 kB) | Large (7.2 MB)
02-Jun-2004
 
 
The Realm of 'Endurance'
The Realm of "Endurance"

This image mosaic, taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, shows the impact crater known as "Endurance." The rover has been traversing the rim of the crater looking for clues to the crater's formation as well as a suitable entry point to the crater. The image was taken on sol 116 of the rover's journey (May 1, 2004), from "Panoramic Position 2" on the southeast side of the crater.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (54 kB) | Large (883 MB)
 
The Temperature of 'Endurance'
The Temperature of "Endurance"

The colored dots in this image mosaic denote thermal data in features that make up the impact crater known as "Endurance." The data was taken by the miniature thermal emission spectrometer instrument on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The information has been overlaid onto a view of the crater from the rover's navigation camera. Blue denotes cooler temperatures of about 220 degrees Kelvin (-63.67 degrees Fahrenheit or -53.15 degrees Celsius), and red denotes warmer temperatures of about 280 degrees Kelvin (44.33 degrees Fahrenheit or 6.85 degrees Celsius).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/ASU
Browse Image (63 kB) | Large (600 MB)
 
Are Ripples a Sign of Water?
Are Ripples a Sign of Water?

Scientists are investigating the ripples and textures seen in this 4-panel mosaic image, taken by the microscopic imager on the instrument deployment device or "robotic arm" of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The images were taken from "Panoramic Position 2" on the southeast side of the rim of "Endurance" Crater. This small set of nearly 150 images was acquired to examine small-scale ripple patterns suggestive of past aqueous processes on Mars.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS
Browse Image | Medium Image (553 kB) | Large (3 MB)
24-May-2004
 
 
Near 'Endurance' on Sol 115
Near 'Endurance' on Sol 115

This cylindrical-projection view combines several frames from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover acquired these frames during its 115th martian day, or "sol," in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars, on May 21, 2004. The rover was near the edge of "Endurance Crater," which dominates the right half of this view. The crater is about 130 meters (about 430 feet) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (296 kB) | Large (1.9 MB)
 
Near 'Endurance' on Sol 115 (3-D)
Near 'Endurance' on Sol 115 (3-D)

This three-dimensional stereo anaglyph was created from several frames from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection. The rover acquired these frames during its 115th martian day, or "sol," in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars, on May 21, 2004. The rover was near the edge of "Endurance Crater," which dominates the right half of this view. The crater is about 130 meters (about 430 feet) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (422 kB) | Large (4 MB)
 
Near 'Endurance' on Sol 115 (left eye)
Near 'Endurance' on Sol 115 (left eye)

This is the left-eye view of a stereo pair created from several frames from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection. The rover acquired these frames during its 115th martian day, or "sol," in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars, on May 21, 2004. The rover was near the edge of "Endurance Crater," which dominates the right half of this view. The crater is about 130 meters (about 430 feet) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (313 kB) | Large (2 MB)
 
Near 'Endurance' on Sol 115 (right eye)
Near 'Endurance' on Sol 115 (right eye)

This is the right-eye view of a stereo pair created from several frames from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection. The rover acquired these frames during its 115th martian day, or "sol," in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars, on May 21, 2004. The rover was near the edge of "Endurance Crater," which dominates the right half of this view. The crater is about 130 meters (about 430 feet) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (292 kB) | Large (1.9 MB)
18-May-2004
 
 
Looking at 'Endurance' on Sol 108
Looking at 'Endurance' on Sol 108

This cylindrical-projection mosaic was created from three navigation camera frames that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired at about 4:05 p.m., local solar time on Mars, on sol 108, May 13, 2004. Opportunity is sitting along the rim of "Endurance Crater." NASA has not yet determined whether Opportunity will venture inside the crater, which is about 130 meters (about 430 feet) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (270 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
 
Looking at 'Endurance' on Sol 108 (3-D)
Looking at 'Endurance' on Sol 108 (3-D)

This three-dimensional anaglyph stereo view was created from navigation camera frames that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired at about 4:05 p.m., local solar time on Mars, on sol 108, May 13, 2004. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection. Opportunity is sitting along the rim of "Endurance Crater." NASA has not yet determined whether Opportunity will venture inside the crater, which is about 130 meters (about 430 feet) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (370 kB) | Large (2.6 MB)
 
Looking at 'Endurance' on Sol 108 (left eye)
Looking at 'Endurance' on Sol 108 (left eye)

This left eye in a stereo pair of views presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from three navigation camera frames that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired at about 4:05 p.m., local solar time on Mars, on sol 108, May 13, 2004. Opportunity is sitting along the rim of "Endurance Crater." NASA has not yet determined whether Opportunity will venture inside the crater, which is about 130 meters (about 430 feet) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (283 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
 
Looking at 'Endurance' on Sol 108 (right eye)
Looking at 'Endurance' on Sol 108 (right eye)

This right eye in a stereo pair of views presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from three navigation camera frames that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired at about 4:05 p.m., local solar time on Mars, on sol 108, May 13, 2004. Opportunity is sitting along the rim of "Endurance Crater." NASA has not yet determined whether Opportunity will venture inside the crater, which is about 130 meters (about 430 feet) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (283 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
 
Opportunity View on Sol 109
Opportunity View on Sol 109

This cylindrical-projection mosaic was created from three navigation camera frames that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired on sol 109, May 15, 2004. Opportunity is sitting along the rim of "Endurance Crater" in the Meridiani Planum region.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (291 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
 
Opportunity View on Sol 109 (3-D)
Opportunity View on Sol 109 (3-D)

This three-dimensional anaglyph stereo view was assembled from navigation camera frames that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired on sol 109, May 15, 2004. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection. Opportunity is sitting along the rim of "Endurance Crater" in the Meridiani Planum region.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (384 kB) | Large (2.7 MB)
 
Opportunity View on Sol 109 (left eye)
Opportunity View on Sol 109 (left eye)

This left eye in a stereo pair of views was assembled from three navigation camera frames that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired on sol 109, May 15, 2004. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection. Opportunity is sitting along the rim of "Endurance Crater" in the Meridiani Planum region.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (292 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
 
Opportunity View on Sol 109 (right eye)
Opportunity View on Sol 109 (right eye)

This right eye in a stereo pair of views was assembled from three navigation camera frames that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired on sol 109, May 15, 2004. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection. Opportunity is sitting along the rim of "Endurance Crater" in the Meridiani Planum region.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (292 kB) | Large (1.4 MB)
17-May-2004
 
 
Seeing 'Endurance' Through Infrared Eyes
Seeing 'Endurance' Through Infrared Eyes

Surface composition in "Endurance Crater" is mapped with color-coded interpretation of data from the miniature thermal emission spectrometer on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The information has been overlaid onto a view of the crater from Opportunity's panoramic camera. Green, such as on some slopes, indicates material rich in the mineral hematite. Blue and purple, such as on some cliffs of exposed rock, indicate the presence of basalt. Basaltic material is volcanic in origin, but the basalt may have been broken down into sand by weathering, then re-deposited by wind or water. Red indicates areas covered by martian dust.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
Browse Image | Large (1.2 MB)
12-May-2004
 
 
Riding the Rim of 'Endurance'
Riding the Rim of 'Endurance'

This cylindrical-projection view was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired on sol 103 (May 8, 2004). Opportunity traversed approximately 13 meters (about 43 feet) farther south along the eastern rim of "Endurance Crater" before reaching the beginning of the "Karatepe" area. Scientists believe this layered band of rock may be a good place to begin studying Endurance because it is less steep and more approachable than the rest of the crater's rocky outcrops.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (204 kB) | Large (3.6 MB)
 
Riding the Rim of 'Endurance' (3-D)
Riding the Rim of 'Endurance' (3-D)

This three-dimensional view in the cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired on sol 103 (May 8, 2004). Opportunity traversed approximately 13 meters (about 43 feet) farther south along the eastern rim of "Endurance Crater" before reaching the beginning of the "Karatepe" area. Scientists believe this layered band of rock may be a good place to begin studying Endurance because it is less steep and more approachable than the rest of the crater's rocky outcrops.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (264 kB) | Large (7.3 MB)
 
Riding the Rim of 'Endurance' (left eye)
Riding the Rim of 'Endurance' (left eye)

This left eye of a stereo pair of views in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired on sol 103 (May 8, 2004). Opportunity traversed approximately 13 meters (about 43 feet) farther south along the eastern rim of "Endurance Crater" before reaching the beginning of the "Karatepe" area. Scientists believe this layered band of rock may be a good place to begin studying Endurance because it is less steep and more approachable than the rest of the crater's rocky outcrops.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (213 kB) | Large (3.8 MB)
 
Riding the Rim of 'Endurance' (right eye)
Riding the Rim of 'Endurance' (right eye)

This right eye of a stereo pair of views in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired on sol 103 (May 8, 2004). Opportunity traversed approximately 13 meters (about 43 feet) farther south along the eastern rim of "Endurance Crater" before reaching the beginning of the "Karatepe" area. Scientists believe this layered band of rock may be a good place to begin studying Endurance because it is less steep and more approachable than the rest of the crater's rocky outcrops.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (212 kB) | Large (3.8 MB)
06-May-2004
 
 
A Crater of Clues to Mars' Buried Past
A Crater of Clues to Mars' Buried Past

This approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the impact crater known as "Endurance." Scientists are eager to explore Endurance for clues to the red planet's history. The crater's exposed walls provide a window to what lies beneath the surface of Mars and thus what geologic processes occurred there in the past. While recent studies of the smaller crater nicknamed "Eagle" revealed an evaporating body of salty water, that crater was not deep enough to indicate what came before the water. Endurance may be able to help answer this question, but the challenge is getting to the scientific targets: most of the crater's rocks are embedded in vertical cliffs. Rover planners are currently developing strategies to overcome this obstacle.

Presently, Opportunity is perched 40 centimeters (15.7 inches) away from the crater's edge. Endurance is roughly 130 meters (430 feet) across.

This image mosaic was taken by the panoramic camera's 480-, 530- and 750-nanometer filters on sols 97 and 98. It consists of a total of 258 individual images.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (361 kB) | Large (26.7 MB)
03-May-2004
 
 
Behold 'Endurance'!
Behold 'Endurance'!

This 180-degree view from the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is the first look inside "Endurance Crater." The view is a cylindrical projection constructed from four images. The crater is about 130 meters (about 430 feet) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (341 kB) | Large (1.8 MB)
 
Behold 'Endurance'! (3-D)
Behold 'Endurance'! (3-D)

This three-dimensional, 180-degree view from the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is the first look inside "Endurance Crater." The view is a cylindrical-perspective projection constructed from four images. The crater is about 130 meters (about 430 feet) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (473 kB) | Large (3.7 MB)
 
Behold 'Endurance'! (left eye)
Behold 'Endurance'! (left eye)

This 180-degree view from the left navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is the first look inside "Endurance Crater." The view is a cylindrical-perspective projection constructed from four images. The crater is about 130 meters (about 430 feet) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (360 kB) | Large (1.9 MB)
 
Behold 'Endurance'! (right eye)
Behold 'Endurance'! (right eye)

This 180-degree view from the right navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is the first look inside "Endurance Crater." The view is a cylindrical-perspective projection constructed from four images. The crater is about 130 meters (about 430 feet) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (362 kB) | Large (2 MB)
30-Apr-2004
 
 
Almost There!
Almost There!

This cylindrical projection was constructed from a sequence of three images taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The images were acquired on sol 94 (April 29, 2004) of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum. The camera acquired the images at approximately 12:40 local solar time, or around 9:15 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time. The images were taken from the rover's new location about 20 meters (65 feet) away from the rim of Opportunity's next target, "Endurance Crater."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (281 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
 
Almost There! (3-D)
Almost There! (3-D)

This three-dimensional, cylindrical-perspective projection was constructed from images taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The images were acquired on sol 94 (April 29, 2004) of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum. The camera acquired the images at approximately 12:40 local solar time, or around 9:15 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time. The images were taken from the rover's new location about 20 meters (65 feet) away from the rim of Opportunity's next target, "Endurance Crater."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (325 kB) | Large (2.4 MB)
 
Almost There! (left eye)
Almost There! (left eye)

This cylindrical-perspective projection was constructed from a sequence of three images taken by the left navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The images were acquired on sol 94 (April 29, 2004) of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum. The camera acquired the images at approximately 12:40 local solar time, or around 9:15 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time. The images were taken from the rover's new location about 20 meters (65 feet) away from the rim of Opportunity's next target, "Endurance Crater."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (257 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
 
Almost There! (right eye)
Almost There! (right eye)

This cylindrical-perspective projection was constructed from a sequence of three images taken by the right navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The images were acquired on sol 94 (April 29, 2004) of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum. The camera acquired the images at approximately 12:40 local solar time, or around 9:15 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time. The images were taken from the rover's new location about 20 meters (65 feet) away from the rim of Opportunity's next target, "Endurance Crater."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (257 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
 
'Endurance'  Looms on the Horizon
'Endurance' Looms on the Horizon

This image mosaic from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera was taken from a rover position approximately 70 meters (about 230 feet) from the rim of "Endurance Crater" on the rover's 93rd sol on Mars. The foreground highlights the now familiar ripples and dimples, common on the plains of Meridiani Planum. Some rock outcrop is seen emerging on the hill to the left, indicating that the rover is driving through the eroded remnants of the crater's ejecta blanket and is getting close to its rim. This light-colored outcrop is probably similar to the rocks seen at "Fram Crater" and "Anatolia," and studied in detail at "Eagle Crater." The Eagle Crater rocks are believed to have been deposited in an open body of water. The science team is intrigued by the darker rock on the far side of the crater wall. Just right of the center, on the far crater wall, rocks appear to form thick, massive layers, suggesting they may have been formed by a different geologic processes than the lighter rocks in the foreground. The greater thickness of layered rocks at Endurance Crater will provide the team with a longer record of geologic processes operating at Meridiani Planum.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (339 kB) | Large (1.5 MB)
 
Approaching 'Endurance'
Approaching 'Endurance'

This cylindrical projection was constructed from three images taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's navigation camera on the rover's 93rd sol on Mars. The camera acquired the images at approximately 12:27 Local Solar Time, or around 8:22 AM Pacific Daylight Time on April 28, 2004. On that sol, Opportunity sat about 75 meters (246 feet) away from the rim of "Endurance Crater."

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (272 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
 
Approaching 'Endurance'(3-D)
Approaching 'Endurance'(3-D)

This three-dimensional, cylindrical-perspective projection was constructed from images taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's navigation camera on the rover's 93rd sol on Mars. The camera acquired the images at approximately 12:27 Local Solar Time, or around 8:22 AM Pacific Daylight Time on April 28, 2004. On that sol, Opportunity sat about 75 meters (246 feet) away from the rim of "Endurance Crater."

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (354 kB) | Large (2.7 MB)
 
Approaching 'Endurance'(left eye)
Approaching 'Endurance'(left eye)

This cylindrical-perspective projection was constructed from a sequence of images taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's navigation camera on the rover's 93rd sol on Mars. The mosaic was created from three images from the camera's left eye. The camera acquired the images at approximately 12:27 Local Solar Time, or around 8:22 AM Pacific Daylight Time on April 28, 2004. On that sol, Opportunity sat about 75 meters (246 feet) away from the rim of "Endurance Crater."

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (280 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
 
Approaching 'Endurance'(right eye)

This cylindrical-perspective projection was constructed from a sequence of images taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's navigation camera on the rover's 93rd sol on Mars. The mosaic was created from three images from the camera's right eye. The camera acquired the images at approximately 12:27 Local Solar Time, or around 8:22 AM Pacific Daylight Time on April 28, 2004. On that sol, Opportunity sat about 75 meters (246 feet) away from the rim of "Endurance Crater."

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (275 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
28-Apr-2004
 
 

Browse Image | Medium Image (191 kB) | Large (1.6 MB)
 
Opportunity Spies Its Target
Opportunity Spies Its Target

This is a forward-looking view of the Meridiani Planum plains that lie between the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity and its primary drive target, "Endurance Crater." The images in this image mosaic were taken by the rover's panoramic camera on sol 88.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (227 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
21-Apr-2004
 
 
One View, Two Craters
One View, Two Craters

This cylindrical projection was constructed from a sequence of four images taken by the navigation camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity.

The images were acquired on sol 85 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum. The camera acquired the images at approximately 14:28 local solar time, or around 6:30 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time, on April 20, 2004.

The view is from the rover's new location, a region dubbed "Fram Crater" located some 450 meters (.3 miles) from "Eagle Crater" and roughly 250 meters (820 feet) from "Endurance Crater" (upper right).

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (191 kB) | Large (1.6 MB)
 

Browse Image | Medium Image (185 kB) | Large (1.5 MB)
 
One View, Two Craters (3-D)
One View, Two Craters (3-D)

This 3-D cylindrical-perspective projection was constructed from a sequence of four images taken by the navigation camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity.

The images were acquired on sol 85 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum. The camera acquired the images at approximately 14:28 local solar time, or around 6:30 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time, on April 20, 2004.

The view is from the rover's new location, a region dubbed "Fram Crater" located some 450 meters (.3 miles) from "Eagle Crater" and roughly 250 meters (820 feet) from "Endurance Crater" (upper right).

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (252 kB) | Large (3.1 MB)
 
One View, Two Craters (left eye)
One View, Two Craters (left eye)

This cylindrical-perspective projection was constructed from a sequence of four images taken by the navigation camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. It was taken with the camera's left eye.

The images were acquired on sol 85 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum. The camera acquired the images at approximately 14:28 local solar time, or around 6:30 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time, on April 20, 2004.

The view is from the rover's new location, a region dubbed "Fram Crater" located some 450 meters (.3 miles) from "Eagle Crater" and roughly 250 meters (820 feet) from "Endurance Crater" (upper right).

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (198 kB) | Large (1.7 MB)
 
One View, Two Craters (right eye)
One View, Two Craters (right eye)

This cylindrical-perspective projection was constructed from a sequence of four images taken by the navigation camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. It was taken with the camera's right eye.

The images were acquired on sol 85 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum. The camera acquired the images at approximately 14:28 local solar time, or around 6:30 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time, on April 20, 2004.

The view is from the rover's new location, a region dubbed "Fram Crater" located some 450 meters (.3 miles) from "Eagle Crater" and roughly 250 meters (820 feet) from "Endurance Crater" (upper right).

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (197 kB) | Large (1.6 MB)
14-Apr-2004
 
 
Opportunity Captures 'Lion King' Panorama
Opportunity Captures "Lion King" Panorama

This approximate true-color panorama, dubbed "Lion King," shows "Eagle Crater" and the surrounding plains of Meridiani Planum. It was obtained by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera on sols 58 and 60 using infrared (750-nanometer), green (530-nanometer) and blue (430-nanometer) filters.

This is the largest panorama obtained yet by either rover. It was taken in eight segments using six filters per segment, for a total of 558 images and more than 75 megabytes of data. Additional lower elevation tiers were added to ensure that the entire crater was covered in the mosaic.

This panorama depicts a story of exploration including the rover's lander, a thorough examination of the outcrop, a study of the soils at the near-side of the lander, a successful exit from Eagle Crater and finally the rover's next desination, the large crater dubbed "Endurance."

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (383 kB) | Large (3.3 MB)
08-Apr-2004
 
 
At the Edge of 'Anatolia'
At the Edge of 'Anatolia'

This 360-degree image mosaic was constructed from a sequence of images taken by the navigation camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The mosaic was created from 10 images.

The images were acquired on the 72nd martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum. The camera acquired the images at approximately 16:00 local solar time, or just before midnight Pacific Daylight Time on April 6, 2004.

The image was taken from the rover's current position along the edge of the large trough dubbed "Anatolia," located some 150 meters (492 feet) away from "Eagle Crater". Scientists will likely investigate the rocks contained here in coming sols. They are also interested in the area's soil, which Ń as evident from the rover's shallow tracks Ń appears stronger than that of Eagle Crater. The dark crater behind the trough can be seen from orbit.

Anatolia was named after the Anatolian fault system in Turkey.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (188 kB) | Large (3.5 MB)
 
Building Up Endurance
Building Up Endurance

This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's navigation camera shows the rover's forward view at Meridiani Planum, Mars, on Sol 70 of the mission (April 5, 2004). The crater dubbed "Endurance Crater," a future rover target less than 1 kilometer (0.6 miles) away, can be seen on the far right. On the left is a trough region dubbed "Anatolia," located some 150 meters (492 feet) away from the rover's previous location "Eagle Crater." The shadow of the rover's panoramic camera mast assembly can be seen on the bottom right.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (231 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
 
Building Up Endurance
Building Up Endurance

This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's navigation camera shows the rover's forward view at Meridiani Planum, Mars, on Sol 70 of the mission (April 5, 2004). The crater dubbed "Endurance Crater," a future rover target less than 1 kilometer (0.6 miles) away, can be seen on the far right. On the left is a trough region dubbed "Anatolia," located some 150 meters (492 feet) away from the rover's previous location "Eagle Crater." The shadow of the rover's panoramic camera mast assembly can be seen on the bottom right.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (231 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
06-Apr-2004
 
 
A Puzzling Crack
A Puzzling Crack

This image, acquired by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, highlights the vast plains of Meridiani Planum. The science team is currently focused on the sinuous crack, which consists of a series of deep dimples sprinkled with rocks that resemble, from a distance, those in the "Eagle Crater" outcrop. On sol 70, Opportunity drove approximately 100 meters (about 328 feet) northeast to a target area along the crack dubbed "Anatolia." In the coming sols, the rover will study the crack in greater detail.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (166 kB) | Large (1.6 MB)
01-Apr-2004
 
 
 
Browse Image (16 kB) | Large (485 kB)
26-Mar-2004
 
 
Eagle-eye View of 'Eagle Crater'
Eagle-eye View of 'Eagle Crater'

This image shows the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's view on its 56th sol on Mars, before it left its landing-site crater. To the right, the rover tracks are visible at the original spot where the rover attempted unsuccessfully to exit the crater. After a one-sol delay, Opportunity took another route to the plains of Meridiani Planum. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (164 kB) | Large (3.1 MB)
 
Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater'
Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater'

This image is the first 360-degree view from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's new position outside "Eagle Crater," the small crater where the rover landed about two months ago. Scientists are busy analyzing Opportunity's new view of the plains of Meridiani Planum. The plentiful ripples are a clear indication that wind is the primary geologic process currently in effect on the plains. The rover's tracks can be seen leading away from Eagle Crater. At the far left are two depressions - each about a meter (about 3.3 feet) across - that feature bright spots in their centers. One possibility is that the bright material is similar in composition to the rocks in Eagle Crater's outcrop and the surrounding darker material is what's referred to as "lag deposit," or erosional remnants, which are much harder and more difficult to wear away. These twin dimples might be revealing pieces of a larger outcrop that lies beneath. The depression closest to Opportunity is whimsically referred to as "Homeplate" and the one behind it as "First Base." The rover's panoramic camera is set to take detailed images of the depressions today, on Opportunity's 58th sol. The backshell and parachute that helped protect the rover and deliver it safely to the surface of Mars are also visible near the horizon, at the left of the image. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (235 kB) | Large (4 MB)
 
Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater'
Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater'

This image is the first 360-degree view from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's new position outside "Eagle Crater," the small crater where the rover landed about two months ago. Scientists are busy analyzing Opportunity's new view of the plains of Meridiani Planum. The plentiful ripples are a clear indication that wind is the primary geologic process currently in effect on the plains. The rover's tracks can be seen leading away from Eagle Crater. At the far left are two depressions - each about a meter (about 3.3 feet) across - that feature bright spots in their centers. One possibility is that the bright material is similar in composition to the rocks in Eagle Crater's outcrop and the surrounding darker material is what's referred to as "lag deposit," or erosional remnants, which are much harder and more difficult to wear away. These twin dimples might be revealing pieces of a larger outcrop that lies beneath. The depression closest to Opportunity is whimsically referred to as "Homeplate" and the one behind it as "First Base." The rover's panoramic camera is set to take detailed images of the depressions today, on Opportunity's 58th sol. The backshell and parachute that helped protect the rover and deliver it safely to the surface of Mars are also visible near the horizon, at the left of the image. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (237 kB) | Large (2 MB)
25-Mar-2004
 
 
A Well-Traveled 'Eagle Crater'
A Well-Traveled 'Eagle Crater'

This is the 3-D version of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's view on its 56th sol on Mars, before it left "Eagle Crater." To the right, the rover tracks are visible at the original spot where the rover attempted unsuccessfully to exit the crater. After a one-sol delay, Opportunity took another route to the plains of Meridiani Planum. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (758 kB) | Large (15.2 MB)
 
A Well-Traveled 'Eagle Crater' (left-eye)
A Well-Traveled 'Eagle Crater' (left-eye)

This is the left-eye version of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's view on its 56th sol on Mars, before it left its landing-site crater. To the right, the rover tracks are visible at the original spot where the rover attempted unsuccessfully to exit the crater. After a one-sol delay, Opportunity took another route to the plains of Meridiani Planum. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (442 kB) | Large (7.2 MB)
 
A Well-Traveled 'Eagle Crater' (right-eye)
A Well-Traveled 'Eagle Crater' (right-eye)

This is the right-eye version of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's view on its 56th sol on Mars, before it left its landing-site crater. To the right, the rover tracks are visible at the original spot where the rover attempted unsuccessfully to exit the crater. After a one-sol delay, Opportunity took another route to the plains of Meridiani Planum. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (442 kB) | Large (7 MB)
23-Mar-2004
 
 
Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater'
Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater'

This image is the first 360-degree view from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's new position outside "Eagle Crater," the small crater where the rover landed about two months ago. Scientists are busy analyzing Opportunity's new view of the plains of Meridiani Planum. The plentiful ripples are a clear indication that wind is the primary geologic process currently in effect on the plains. The rover's tracks can be seen leading away from Eagle Crater. At the far left are two depressions - each about a meter (about 3.3 feet) across - that feature bright spots in their centers. One possibility is that the bright material is similar in composition to the rocks in Eagle Crater's outcrop and the surrounding darker material is what's referred to as "lag deposit," or erosional remnants, which are much harder and more difficult to wear away. These twin dimples might be revealing pieces of a larger outcrop that lies beneath. The depression closest to Opportunity is whimsically referred to as "Homeplate" and the one behind it as "First Base." The rover's panoramic camera is set to take detailed images of the depressions today, on Opportunity's 58th sol. The backshell and parachute that helped protect the rover and deliver it safely to the surface of Mars are also visible near the horizon, at the left of the image.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (423 kB) | Large (3.9 MB)
 
Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater' (3-D)
Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater' (3-D)

This is a 3-D version of the first 360-degree view from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's new position outside "Eagle Crater," the small crater where the rover landed about two months ago. Scientists are busy analyzing Opportunity's new view of the plains of Meridiani Planum. The plentiful ripples are a clear indication that wind is the primary geologic process currently in effect on the plains. The rover's tracks can be seen leading away from Eagle Crater. At the far left are two depressions - each about a meter (about 3.3 feet) across - that feature bright spots in their centers. One possibility is that the bright material is similar in composition to the rocks in Eagle Crater's outcrop and the surrounding darker material is what's referred to as "lag deposit," or erosional remnants, which are much harder and more difficult to wear away. These twin dimples might be revealing pieces of a larger outcrop that lies beneath. The depression closest to Opportunity is whimsically referred to as "Homeplate" and the one behind it as "First Base." The rover's panoramic camera is set to take detailed images of the depressions today, on Opportunity's 58th sol. The backshell and parachute that helped protect the rover and deliver it safely to the surface of Mars are also visible near the horizon, at the left of the image. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (515 kB) | Large (8.1 MB)
 
Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater' (Left-eye)
Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater' (Left-eye)

This is the left-eye version of the first 360-degree view from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's new position outside "Eagle Crater," the small crater where the rover landed about two months ago. Scientists are busy analyzing Opportunity's new view of the plains of Meridiani Planum. The plentiful ripples are a clear indication that wind is the primary geologic process currently in effect on the plains. The rover's tracks can be seen leading away from Eagle Crater. At the far left are two depressions - each about a meter (about 3.3 feet) across - that feature bright spots in their centers. One possibility is that the bright material is similar in composition to the rocks in Eagle Crater's outcrop and the surrounding darker material is what's referred to as "lag deposit," or erosional remnants, which are much harder and more difficult to wear away. These twin dimples might be revealing pieces of a larger outcrop that lies beneath. The depression closest to Opportunity is whimsically referred to as "Homeplate" and the one behind it as "First Base." The rover's panoramic camera is set to take detailed images of the depressions today, on Opportunity's 58th sol. The backshell and parachute that helped protect the rover and deliver it safely to the surface of Mars are also visible near the horizon, at the left of the image. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (444 kB) | Large (4 MB)
 
Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater' (Right-eye)
Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater' (Right-eye)

This is the right-eye version of the first 360-degree view from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's new position outside "Eagle Crater," the small crater where the rover landed about two months ago. Scientists are busy analyzing Opportunity's new view of the plains of Meridiani Planum. The plentiful ripples are a clear indication that wind is the primary geologic process currently in effect on the plains. The rover's tracks can be seen leading away from Eagle Crater. At the far left are two depressions - each about a meter (about 3.3 feet) across - that feature bright spots in their centers. One possibility is that the bright material is similar in composition to the rocks in Eagle Crater's outcrop and the surrounding darker material is what's referred to as "lag deposit," or erosional remnants, which are much harder and more difficult to wear away. These twin dimples might be revealing pieces of a larger outcrop that lies beneath. The depression closest to Opportunity is whimsically referred to as "Homeplate" and the one behind it as "First Base." The rover's panoramic camera is set to take detailed images of the depressions today, on Opportunity's 58th sol. The backshell and parachute that helped protect the rover and deliver it safely to the surface of Mars are also visible near the horizon, at the left of the image. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (441 kB) | Large (4 MB)
22-Mar-2004
 
 
Eyeing 'Eagle Crater'
Eyeing "Eagle Crater"

This image mosaic, compiled from navigation and panoramic camera images during the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's 33rd, 35th, and 36th sols on Mars, shows a panoramic view of the crater where the rover had been exploring since its dramatic arrival in late January 2004. The crater, now informally referred to as "Eagle Crater," is approximately 22 meters (72 feet) in diameter. Opportunity's lander is visible in the center of the image. Track marks reveal the rover's progress. The rover cameras recorded this view as Opportunity climbed close to the crater rim as part of a soil survey campaign.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (404 kB) | Large (9.7 MB)
11-Mar-2004
 
 
Here-a-Hematite, There-a-Hematite
Here-a-Hematite, There-a-Hematite

These maps, created with data from the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera mast assembly, show the hematite abundance as detected by the instrument from inside the crater at Opportunity's landing site. Hematite data was taken at infrared wavelengths to create these maps, which have been superimposed on images from the rover's navigation camera to provide the visual context of how the hematite is distributed across the martian surface. The hematite abundance has been color-coded, with blue showing relatively no abundance to red showing about 20 percent abundance. Each roughly circular spot represents a single observation by the instrument.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
Browse Image | Medium Image (452 kB) | Large (2.4 MB)
 
Puzzling Patches of Hematite
Puzzling Patches of Hematite

These maps, acquired from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity prior to the rover's roll-off, are shown along with data collected at the five locations the rover visited along the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop (dubbed "Alpha," "Bravo," "Charlie," Delta," and "Echo"). The data, collected by the rover's miniature thermal emission spectrometer, has been superimposed on images taken by the navigation camera. The areas investigated are different sizes because of the differing distances from the rover. The bright red region behind the rover has one of the highest hematite concentrations observed in the crater. The areas on the floor of the crater and in the outcrop that the rover has been sampling have much lower hematite concentrations than those found on the surrounding plains. Data from the miniature thermal emission spectrometer show that the floor of the crater is covered with basaltic sand.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
Browse Image (45 kB) | Large (821 kB)
05-Mar-2004
 
 
The Outcrop in a Nutshell
The Outcrop in a Nutshell

This image mosaic taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity highlights various rock targets within the outcrop lining the inner edge of the small crater where the rover landed. Opportunity recently finished examining the rock dubbed "Last Chance," then rolled over to "Wave Ripple," a section of rock in the region nicknamed "The Dells." Tomorrow, the rover will take a series of "touch-and-go" microscopic images at "Wave Ripple," before heading to another rock region with targets named "Slick Rock" and "Berry Bowl."

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (350 kB) | Large (2.2 MB)
 
Opportunity's Heatshield on the Horizon
Opportunity's Heatshield on the Horizon

This image mosaic from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the distant horizon from Opportunity's position inside a small crater at Meridiani Planum, Mars. To the left is a large crater about 700 meters (2,296 feet) away from the landing site and approximately 200 meters (656 feet) in diameter. In the center, Opportunity's heatshield and its impact mark can be seen at a distance of approximately 875 meters (one-half mile) from the landing site. To the right, a string of bounce marks left by the rover's airbags is visible. Near the mark just outside the landing site crater's rim is the largest rock in the area. This rock is about 40 centimeters (16 inches) across and 50 meters (164 feet) from the rover's position. The image is an enhanced color composite acquired on the 35th and 36th martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's journey, using three different wavelength filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (226 kB) | Large (2.4 MB)
02-Mar-2004
 
 
A Treasure Trove of Martian Rocks
A Treasure Trove of Martian Rocks

This high-resolution image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera highlights the puzzling rock outcrop near the rover's landing site. Opportunity has been investigating the outcrop with the suite of scientific instruments located on its robotic arm. These layered rocks measure only 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall, about the height of a street curb. Data from the panoramic camera's near-infrared, blue and green filters were combined to create this approximate, true-color image. This same image was previously released on Jan. 28, 2004 (PIA05163).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (225 kB) | Large (4 MB)
 
Over Here, Over There
Over Here, Over There

This partial panoramic image from the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the lander in the center of the crater at Meridiani Planum, Mars. The image, taken on sol 34 of Opportunity's journey, was not completely downlinked as of sol 35 of the rover's mission. Note the view of the plains outside the crater, the rover tracks in the center and right of the image, and the airbag bounce marks behind the lander.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (292 kB) | Large (2.7 MB)
 
Opportunity Spies 'Endurance' on the Horizon
Opportunity Spies "Endurance" on the Horizon

This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows the eastern plains that stretch beyond the small crater where the rover landed. In the distance, the rim of a larger crater dubbed "Endurance" can be seen.

This color mosaic was taken on the 32nd martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission and spans 20 degrees of the horizon. It was taken while Opportunity was parked at the north end of the outcrop, in front of the rock region dubbed "El Capitan" and facing east.

The features seen at the horizon are the near and far rims of "Endurance," the largest crater within about 6 kilometers (4 miles) of the lander. Using orbital data from the Mars Orbiter Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, scientists estimated the crater to be 160 meters (175 yards) in diameter, and about 720 meters (half a mile) away from the lander.

The highest point visible on "Endurance" is the highest point on the far wall of the crater; the sun is illuminating the inside of the far wall.

Between the location where the image was taken at "El Capitan" and "Endurance" are the flat, smooth Meridiani plains, which scientists believe are blanketed in the iron-bearing mineral called hematite. The dark horizontal feature near the bottom of the picture is a small, five-meter (16-feet) crater, only 50 meters (164 feet) from Opportunity's present position.

When the rover leaves the crater some 2 to 3 weeks from now, "Endurance" is one of several potential destinations.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/MSSS
Browse Image (43 kB) | Large (333 kB)
26-Feb-2004
 
 
Opportunity Landing Spot Panorama (3-D Model)
Opportunity Landing Spot Panorama (3-D Model)

The rocky outcrop traversed by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is visible in this three-dimensional model of the rover's landing site. Opportunity has acquired close-up images along the way, and scientists are using the rover's instruments to closely examine portions of interest. The white fragments that look crumpled near the center of the image are portions of the airbags. Distant scenery is displayed on a spherical backdrop or "billboard" for context. Artifacts near the top rim of the crater are a result of the transition between the three-dimensional model and the billboard. Portions of the terrain model lacking sufficient data appear as blank spaces or gaps, colored reddish-brown for better viewing. This image was generated using special software from NASA's Ames Research Center and a mosaic of images taken by the rover's panoramic camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Ames/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (157 kB) | Large (1.6 MB)
 
Opportunity Landing Spot Panorama Close-Up (3-D Model)
Opportunity Landing Spot Panorama Close-Up (3-D Model)

The rocky outcrop traversed by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is visible in this zoomed-in portion of a three-dimensional model of the rover's landing site. Opportunity has acquired close-up images along the way, and scientists are using the rover's instruments to closely examine portions of interest. The white fragments that look crumpled near the center of the image are portions of the airbags. Distant scenery is displayed on a spherical backdrop or "billboard" for context. Artifacts near the top rim of the crater are a result of the transition between the three-dimensional model and the billboard. Portions of the terrain model lacking sufficient data appear as blank spaces or gaps, colored reddish-brown for better viewing. This image was generated using special software from NASA's Ames Research Center and a mosaic of images taken by the rover's panoramic camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Ames/Cornell
Browse Image (76 kB) | Large (731 kB)
 
Charlie Flats and El Capitan
Charlie Flats and El Capitan

This mosaic image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity’s panoramic camera shows two regions of the rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. The region on the left, dubbed “Charlie Flats," was imaged because it contains an assortment of small grains, pebbles and spherules, as well as both dark and light soil deposits. The region on the right is where Opportunity is parked and is doing work as of Sol 33 of its mission (February 26, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (554 kB) | Large (22 MB)
19-Feb-2004
 
 
El Capitan or Bust
El Capitan or Bust

This image mosaic taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera highlights the rover's next target - a collection of rocks within the larger outcrop nicknamed "El Capitan." "El Capitan" is located at the top of the outcrop, a bit right of center. Opportunity will travel after it finishes exploring the trench dug by with one of its wheels.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (32 kB) | Medium Image (571 kB) | Large (17 MB)
14-Feb-2004
 
 
Red Marks the Spot
Red Marks the Spot

This hematite abundance index map helps geologists choose hematite-rich locations to visit around Opportunity's landing site. Blue dots equal areas low in hematite and red dots equal areas high in hematite.

Why Hematite

Geologists are eager to reach the hematite-rich area in the upper left to closely examine the soil, which may reveal secrets about how the hematite got to this location. Knowing how the hematite on Mars was formed may help scientists characterize the past environment and determine whether that environment provided favorable conditions for life.

The Plan

Over the next few sols, engineers and scientists plan to drive Opportunity to the hematite-rich area then attempt a "pre-trench" sequence, taking measurements with the Mössbauer spectrometer, alpha particle X-ray spectrometer and microscopic imager. Next, the plan is to trench the hematite rich area by spinning one wheel in place to "dig" a shallow hole. Finally, scientists will aim the instrument arm back at the same area where it pre-trenched to get post-trench data with the same instruments to compare and contrast the levels of hematite and revel how deep the hematite lays in the dirt.

Index Map Details

The hematite abundance index map was created using data from the miniature thermal emission instrument. The first layer is a mosaic of panoramic camera images taken prior to egress, when Opportunity was still on the lander. The colored dots represent data collected by the miniature thermal emission spectrometer on sol 11, after Opportunity had rolled off of the lander and the rover was located at the center of the blue semi-circle.

The spectrometer is located on the panoramic camera mast. On sol 11, it took a low-angle 180-degree panorama of the area in front of the rover, indicated by the blue shaded dots. The instrument then raised the angle of its field of view a few degrees higher to sweep around behind the rover, indicated by the red and yellow dots offset at the far sides of the image.

JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Exploration Rover project for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (21 kB) | Medium Image (93 kB) | Large (1.7 MB)
02-Feb-2004
 
 
As Far as Opportunity's Eye Can See
As Far as Opportunity's Eye Can See

This expansive view of the martian real estate surrounding the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is the first 360 degree, high-resolution color image taken by the rover's panoramic camera. The airbag marks, or footprints, seen in the soil trace the route by which Opportunity rolled to its final resting spot inside a small crater at Meridiani Planum, Mars. The exposed rock outcropping is a future target for further examination. This image mosaic consists of 225 individual frames.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (291 kB) | Large (8.5 MB)
28-Jan-2004
 
 
Shades and Shapes of Mars
Shades and Shapes of Mars

This image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera highlights the flat and dark terrain of its landing site at Meridiani Planum. The landscape is in contrast to that of past landing sites on Mars, which show variations in color and topography. For example, the Viking 1 and Viking 2 missions observed rocky, dust-covered surfaces (PIA00393, PIA00568) much like those observed at Pathfinder's landing site (PIA02405). Gusev Crater, the landing site of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, is slightly darker in color but flat and speckled with a sparse array of rocks (PIA05102). Meridiani Planum has even fewer rocks than Gusev Crater and is darkest and cleanest of all the landing sites. This assortment of martian shades and shapes are further revealed in an image of the red planet taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (PIA03154).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (395 kB) | Large (1.7 MB)
 
A Geologist's Treasure Trove
A Geologist's Treasure Trove

This high-resolution image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera highlights the puzzling rock outcropping that scientists are eagerly planning to investigate. Presently, Opportunity is on its lander facing northeast; the outcropping lies to the northwest. These layered rocks measure only 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall and are thought to be either volcanic ash deposits or sediments carried by water or wind. Data from the panoramic camera's near-infrared, blue and green filters were combined to create this approximate, true-color image.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (378 kB) | Large (4.1 MB)
27-Jan-2004
 
 
Not of this Earth (3-D)
Not of this Earth (3-D)

This sweeping 3-D look at the unusual rock outcropping near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was captured by the rover's panoramic camera. Scientists believe the layered rocks are either volcanic ash deposits, or sediments laid down by wind or water. Opportunity landed at Meridiani Planum, Mars on January 24 at 9:05 p.m. PST.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (652 kB) | Large (6.7 MB)
 
Not of this Earth
Not of this Earth

This sweeping look at the unusual rock outcropping near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was captured by the rover's left panoramic camera. Scientists believe the layered rocks are either volcanic ash deposits, or sediments laid down by wind or water. Opportunity landed at Meridiani Planum, Mars on January 24 at 9:05 p.m. PST.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (529 kB) | Large (3.4 MB)
 
Not of this Earth-2
Not of this Earth-2

This sweeping look at the unusual rock outcropping near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was captured by the rover's right panoramic camera. Scientists believe the layered rocks are either volcanic ash deposits, or sediments laid down by wind or water. Opportunity landed at Meridiani Planum, Mars on January 24 at 9:05 p.m. PST.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (555 kB) | Large (3.8 MB)
26-Jan-2004
 
 
A Hole in One
A Hole in One

The interior of a crater surrounding the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at Meridiani Planum on Mars can be seen in this color image from the rover's panoramic camera. This is the darkest landing site ever visited by a spacecraft on Mars. The rim of the crater is approximately 10 meters (32 feet) from the rover. The crater is estimated to be 20 meters (65 feet) in diameter. Scientists are intrigued by the abundance of rock outcrops dispersed throughout the crater, as well as the crater's soil, which appears to be a mixture of coarse gray grains and fine reddish grains.

Data taken from the camera's near-infrared, green and blue filters were combined to create this approximate true color picture, taken on the first day of Opportunity's journey. The view is to the west-southwest of the rover.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (1.4 MB) | Large (14.7 MB)
25-Jan-2004
 
 
First Panoramic Look at Meridiani Planum, Mars
First Panoramic Look at Meridiani Planum, Mars

This 360-degree panorama is one of the first images beamed back to Earth from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shortly after it touched down at Meridiani Planum, Mars. The image was captured by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (25 kB) | Medium Image (72 kB) | Large (412 kB)
24-Jan-2004
 
 
Opportunity Landing Site Target Ellipse
Opportunity Landing Site Target Ellipse

This is a map of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's predicted landing site at a region on Mars called Meridiani Planum. This region is suspected to contain gray hematite, an iron-rich mineral that usually forms in the presence of water on Earth. On Jan. 25, 2004, the rover has a 99 percent chance of landing within the ellipse, which measures approximately 60 kilometers (37 miles) long and 4 kilometers (2 miles) wide. Its exact target is where the black longitude and latitude lines cross within the ellipse, left of the white cross that marks the center of the ellipse. The image was taken by the thermal emission imaging system on the orbiting Mars Odyssey.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/ASU
Browse Image (158 kB) | Medium Image (593 kB) | Large (3.6 MB)
 
Opportunity Landing Site Target Ellipse (Close-up)
Opportunity Landing Site Target Ellipse (Close-up)

This is close-up of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's predicted landing site at a region on Mars called Meridiani Planum. This region is suspected to contain gray hematite, an iron-rich mineral that usually forms in the presence of water on Earth. On Jan. 25, 2004, the rover has a 99 percent chance of landing within the ellipse, which measures approximately 60 kilometers (37 miles) long and 4 kilometers (2 miles) wide. Its exact target is where the black longitude and latitude lines cross within the ellipse, left of the white cross that marks the center of the ellipse. The image was taken by the thermal emission imaging system on the orbiting Mars Odyssey.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/ASU
Browse Image (115 kB) | Medium Image (407 kB) | Large (2.2 MB)

JPL Image Use Policy

USA.gov
PRIVACY    |     FAQ    |     SITEMAP    |     CREDITS