NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology JPL HOME EARTH SOLAR SYSTEM STARS & GALAXIES SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY JPL Email News RSS Mobile Video
Follow this link to skip to the main content
JPL banner - links to JPL and CalTech
left nav graphic Overview Science Technology The Mission People Spotlights Events Multimedia All Mars
Mars for Kids
Mars for Students
Mars for Educators
Mars for Press
+ Mars Home
+ Rovers Home
Multimedia
Summary
Images
Press Release Images
Spirit
Opportunity
All Raw Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Panoramas
Spirit
Opportunity
3-D Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Special-Effects Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Spacecraft
Mars Artwork
Landing Sites
Videos
Podcasts
Panoramas: Opportunity
2004   |   2005   |   2006   |   2007   |   2008   |   2009
2010   |   2011   |   2012   |   2013   |   2014   |   2015
15-Nov-2006
 
 
Opportunity's View, Sol 959
Opportunity's View, Sol 959

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this view of the rover's surroundings on the 959th sol, or Martian day, of its surface mission (Oct. 5, 2006)

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (167 kB) | Large (3.7 MB)
Hi-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
 
Opportunity's View, Sol 959, (Stereo)
Opportunity's View, Sol 959, (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo view of the rover's surroundings on the 959th sol, or Martian day, of its surface mission (Oct. 5, 2006).

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (187 kB) | Large (7.8 MB)
Hi-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
 
Opportunity's View, Sol 959 (Left Eye)
Opportunity's View, Sol 959 (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this view of the rover's surroundings on the 959th sol, or Martian day, of its surface mission (Oct. 5, 2006).

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (184 kB) | Large (4.0 MB)
Hi-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
 
Opportunity's View, Sols 959 (Right Eye)
Opportunity's View, Sols 959 (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this view of the rover's surroundings on the 959th sol, or Martian day, of its surface mission (Oct. 5, 2006).

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (182 kB) | Large (3.9 MB)
Hi-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
14-Nov-2006
 
 
Combined images of rover's surroundings
Opportunity's View, Sol 958

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this view of the rover's surroundings on the 958th sol, or Martian day, of its surface mission (Oct. 4, 2006).

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (277 kB) | Large (2 MB)
Hi-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
 
Stereo view of rover's surroundings
Opportunity's View, Sol 958 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo view of the rover's surroundings on the 958th sol, or Martian day, of its surface mission (Oct. 4, 2006).

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The image appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-green stereo glasses.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (293 kB) | Large (4.2 MB)
Hi-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
 
View of rover's surroundings (Left Eye)
Opportunity's View, Sol 958 (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this view of the rover's surroundings on the 958th sol, or Martian day, of its surface mission (Oct. 4, 2006).

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (291 kB) | Large (2.1 MB)
Hi-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
 
View of rover's surroundings (Right Eye)
Opportunity's View, Sol 958 (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this view of the rover's surroundings on the 958th sol, or Martian day, of its surface mission (Oct. 4, 2006).

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (289 kB) | Large (2.1 MB)
Hi-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
19-Oct-2006
 
 
This image superimposes an artist's concept of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity atop the 'Cabo Frio' promontory on the rim of 'Victoria Crater' in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars.
Opportunity on 'Cabo Frio' (Simulated)

This image superimposes an artist's concept of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity atop the 'Cabo Frio' promontory on the rim of 'Victoria Crater' in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. It is done to give a sense of scale. The underlying image was taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (Sept. 28, 2006).

This synthetic image of NASA's Opportunity Mars Exploration Rover at Victoria Crater was produced using "Virtual Presence in Space" technology. Developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., this technology combines visualization and image processing tools with Hollywood-style special effects. The image was created using a photorealistic model of the rover and an approximately full-color mosaic.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (515 kB) | Large (2 MB)
06-Oct-2006
 
 
Superimposed Rover on Rim of Victoria Crater
Superimposed Rover on Rim of Victoria Crater

This image superimposes an artist's concept of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on the rim of Victoria Crater. It is done to give a sense of scale.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (305 kB) | Large (2.1 MB)
Hi-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
 
Layers of 'Cabo Frio' in 'Victoria Crater'
Layers of 'Cabo Frio' in 'Victoria Crater'

This view of "Victoria crater" is looking southeast from "Duck Bay" towards the dramatic promontory called "Cabo Frio." The small crater in the right foreground, informally known as "Sputnik", is about 20 meters (about 65 feet) away from the rover, the tip of the spectacular, layered, Cabo Frio promontory itself is about 200 meters (about 650 feet) away from the rover, and the exposed rock layers are about 15 meters (about 50 feet) tall. This is an approximately true color rendering of images taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 952nd sol, or Martian day, (Sept. 28, 2006) using the camera's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (285 kB) | Large (3.3 MB)
 
Layers of 'Cabo Frio' in 'Victoria Crater' (False Color)
Layers of 'Cabo Frio' in 'Victoria Crater' (False Color)

This view of "Victoria crater" is looking southeast from "Duck Bay" towards the dramatic promontory called "Cabo Frio." The small crater in the right foreground, informally known as "Sputnik", is about 20 meters (about 65 feet) away from the rover, the tip of the spectacular, layered, Cabo Frio promontory itself is about 200 meters (about 650 feet) away from the rover, and the exposed rock layers are about 15 meters (about 50 feet) tall. This is an enhanced false color rendering of images taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 952nd sol, or Martian day, (Sept. 28, 2006) using the camera's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (354 kB) | Large (3.9 MB)
 
Layers of 'Cabo Frio' in 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)
Layers of 'Cabo Frio' in 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)

This view of "Victoria crater" is looking southeast from "Duck Bay" towards the dramatic promontory called "Cabo Frio." The small crater in the right foreground, informally known as "Sputnik", is about 20 meters (about 65 feet) away from the rover, the tip of the spectacular, layered, Cabo Frio promontory itself is about 200 meters (about 650 feet) away from the rover, and the exposed rock layers are about 15 meters (about 50 feet) tall. This is a red-blue stereo anaglyph generated from images taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 952nd sol, or Martian day, (Sept. 28, 2006) using the camera's 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (303 kB) | Large (3.5 MB)
 
Layers of 'Cape Verde' in 'Victoria Crater'
Layers of 'Cape Verde' in 'Victoria Crater'

This view of Victoria crater is looking north from "Duck Bay" towards the dramatic promontory called "Cape Verde." The dramatic cliff of layered rocks is about 50 meters (about 165 feet) away from the rover and is about 6 meters (about 20 feet) tall. The taller promontory beyond that is about 100 meters (about 325 feet) away, and the vista beyond that extends away for more than 400 meters (about 1300 feet) into the distance. This is an approximately true color rendering of images taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 952nd sol, or Martian day, (Sept. 28, 2006) using the camera's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (317 kB) | Large (2.9 MB)
 
Layers of 'Cape Verde' in 'Victoria Crater' (False Color)
Layers of 'Cape Verde' in 'Victoria Crater' (False Color)

This view of Victoria crater is looking north from "Duck Bay" towards the dramatic promontory called "Cape Verde." The dramatic cliff of layered rocks is about 50 meters (about 165 feet) away from the rover and is about 6 meters (about 20 feet) tall. The taller promontory beyond that is about 100 meters (about 325 feet) away, and the vista beyond that extends away for more than 400 meters (about 1300 feet) into the distance. This is an enhanced false color rendering of images taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 952nd sol, or Martian day, (Sept. 28, 2006) using the camera's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (361 kB) | Large (3.2 MB)
 
Layers of 'Cape Verde' in 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)
Layers of 'Cape Verde' in 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)

This view of Victoria crater is looking north from "Duck Bay" towards the dramatic promontory called "Cape Verde." The dramatic cliff of layered rocks is about 50 meters (about 165 feet) away from the rover and is about 6 meters (about 20 feet) tall. The taller promontory beyond that is about 100 meters (about 325 feet) away, and the vista beyond that extends away for more than 400 meters (about 1300 feet) into the distance. This is a red-blue stereo anaglyph generated from images taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 952nd sol, or Martian day, (Sept. 28, 2006) using the camera's 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (322 kB) | Large (3.0 MB)
 
Layers of 'Cape Verde' in 'Victoria Crater' (Enhanced)
Layers of 'Cape Verde' in 'Victoria Crater' (Enhanced)

This view of Victoria crater is looking north from "Duck Bay" towards the dramatic promontory called "Cape Verde." The dramatic cliff of layered rocks is about 50 meters (about 165 feet) away from the rover and is about 6 meters (about 20 feet) tall. The taller promontory beyond that is about 100 meters (about 325 feet) away, and the vista beyond that extends away for more than 400 meters (about 1300 feet) into the distance. This is a false color rendering (enhanced to bring out details from within the shadowed regions of the scene) of images taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 952nd sol, or Martian day, (Sept. 28, 2006) using the camera's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (185 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
28-Sep-2006
 
 
'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay'
'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay'

NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the "Duck Bay" alcove along the rim of "Victoria Crater" during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the seven exposures combined into this mosaic view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named "Cape Verde," on the left, and "Cabo Frio," on the right.

Victoria Crater is about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past enviromnental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (166 kB) | Large (2.7 MB)
 
'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Stereo)
'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Stereo)

NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the "Duck Bay" alcove along the rim of "Victoria Crater" during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the exposures combined into this stereo anaglyph view of the crater's interior, which appears three dimensional when viewed through red-green glasses. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named "Cape Verde," on the left, and "Cabo Frio," on the right.

Victoria Crater is about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past enviromnental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (195 kB) | Large (5.5 MB)
 
'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Left Eye)
'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the "Duck Bay" alcove along the rim of "Victoria Crater" during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the exposures combined into this left-eye member of a stereo pair showing the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named "Cape Verde," on the left, and "Cabo Frio," on the right.

Victoria Crater is about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past enviromnental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (192 kB) | Large (2.9 MB)
 
'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Right Eye)
'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the "Duck Bay" alcove along the rim of "Victoria Crater" during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the exposures combined into this right-eye member of a stereo pair showing the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named "Cape Verde," on the left, and "Cabo Frio," on the right.

Victoria Crater is about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past enviromnental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (191 kB) | Large (2.8 MB)
27-Sep-2006
 
 
This image is a 3d image of Opportunity's view on the rim of 'Victoria Crater'
On the Rim of 'Victoria Crater'(Stereo)

NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reached the rim of "Victoria Crater" in Mars' Meridiani Planum region with a 26-meter (85-foot) drive during the rover's 951st Martian day, or sol (Sept. 26, 2006). After the drive, the rover's navigation camera took the exposures combined into this stereo anaglyph view of the crater's interior, which appears three dimensional when viewed through red-green glasses. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

A half mile in the distance one can see about 20 percent of the far side of the crater framed by the rocky cliffs in the foreground to the left and right of the image. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind.

The position at the end of the sol 951 drive is about six meters from the lip of an alcove called "Duck Bay." The rover team planned a drive for sol 952 that would move a few more meters forward, plus more imaging of the near and far walls of the crater.

Victoria Crater is about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (299 kB) | Large (2.4 MB)
 
This image is a 'left eye' view from Opportunity on the Rim of 'Victoria Crater'
On the Rim of 'Victoria Crater' (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reached the rim of "Victoria Crater" in Mars' Meridiani Planum region with a 26-meter (85-foot) drive during the rover's 951st Martian day, or sol (Sept. 26, 2006). After the drive, the rover's navigation camera took the exposures combined into this left-eye member of a stereo pair showing the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

A half mile in the distance one can see about 20 percent of the far side of the crater framed by the rocky cliffs in the foreground to the left and right of the image. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind.

The position at the end of the sol 951 drive is about six meters from the lip of an alcove called "Duck Bay." The rover team planned a drive for sol 952 that would move a few more meters forward, plus more imaging of the near and far walls of the crater.

Victoria Crater is about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (288 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
 
This image is a 'right eye' view from Opportunity on the rim of 'Victoria Crater'
On the Rim of 'Victoria Crater' (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reached the rim of "Victoria Crater" in Mars' Meridiani Planum region with a 26-meter (85-foot) drive during the rover's 951st Martian day, or sol (Sept. 26, 2006). After the drive, the rover's navigation camera took the exposures combined into this right-eye member of a stereo pair showing the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

A half mile in the distance one can see about 20 percent of the far side of the crater framed by the rocky cliffs in the foreground to the left and right of the image. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind.

The position at the end of the sol 951 drive is about six meters from the lip of an alcove called "Duck Bay." The rover team planned a drive for sol 952 that would move a few more meters forward, plus more imaging of the near and far walls of the crater.

Victoria Crater is about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (291 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
 
This image shows Opportunity's view from the rim of 'Victoria Crater'
On the Rim of 'Victoria Crater'

NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reached the rim of "Victoria Crater" in Mars' Meridiani Planum region with a 26-meter (85-foot) drive during the rover's 951st Martian day, or sol (Sept. 26, 2006). After the drive, the rover's navigation camera took the three exposures combined into this view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

A half mile in the distance one can see about 20 percent of the far side of the crater framed by the rocky cliffs in the foreground to the left and right of the image. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind.

The position at the end of the sol 951 drive is about six meters from the lip of an alcove called "Duck Bay." The rover team planned a drive for sol 952 that would move a few more meters forward, plus more imaging of the near and far walls of the crater.

Victoria Crater is about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed.

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (244 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
 
This image is a combinaation of six exposures taken by Opportunity's navagation camera.  The images were taken within about 20 meters of the rim of 'Victoria Crater'  The scalloped shape of the crater is visible on the left edge.
'Victoria' After Sol 950 Drive

A drive of about 30 meters (about 100 feet) on the 950th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's exploration of Mars' Meridiani Planum region (Sept. 25, 2006) brought the NASA rover to within about 20 meters (about 66 feet) of the rim of "Victoria Crater." From that position, the rover's navigation camera took the six exposures combined into this view. The scalloped shape of the crater is visible on the left edge. Due to a small dune or ripple close to the nearest part of the rim, the scientists and engineers on the rover team planned on sol 951 to drive to the right of the ripple, but not quite all the way to the rim, then to proceed to the rim the following sol. The image is presented in cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Victoria Crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) in diameter, about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is the expectation that a thick stack of geological layers will be exposed in the crater walls, potentially several times the thickness that was previously studied at Endurance and therefore, potentially preserving several times the historical record.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (188 kB) | Large (2.2 MB)
 
This image, 3d image was taken by Opportunity within about 20 meters, or 66 feet, of the rim of 'Victoria Crater'
'Victoria' After Sol 950 Drive (Stereo)

A drive of about 30 meters (about 100 feet) on the 950th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's exploration of Mars' Meridiani Planum region (Sept. 25, 2006) brought the NASA rover to within about 20 meters (about 66 feet) of the rim of "Victoria Crater." From that position, the rover's navigation camera took the exposures combined into this stereo anaglyph, which appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-green glasses. The scalloped shape of the crater is visible on the left edge. Due to a small dune or ripple close to the nearest part of the rim, the scientists and engineers on the rover team planned on sol 951 to drive to the right of the ripple, but not quite all the way to the rim, then to proceed to the rim the following sol. The image is presented in cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Victoria Crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) in diameter, about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is the expectation that a thick stack of geological layers will be exposed in the crater walls, potentially several times the thickness that was previously studied at Endurance and therefore, potentially preserving several times the historical record.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (240 kB) | Large (3.8 MB)
 
This 'left eye' view of 'Victoria' was taken by Opportunity after Sol 950 drive when the Rover was within 20 meters, 66 feet, of the rim of 'Victoria Crater'
'Victoria' After Sol 950 Drive (Left Eye)

A drive of about 30 meters (about 100 feet) on the 950th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's exploration of Mars' Meridiani Planum region (Sept. 25, 2006) brought the NASA rover to within about 20 meters (about 66 feet) of the rim of "Victoria Crater." From that position, the rover's navigation camera took the five exposures combined into this view, which is the left-eye member of a stereo pair. The scalloped shape of the crater is visible on the left edge. Due to a small dune or ripple close to the nearest part of the rim, the scientists and engineers on the rover team planned on sol 951 to drive to the right of the ripple, but not quite all the way to the rim, then to proceed to the rim the following sol. The image is presented in cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Victoria Crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) in diameter, about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is the expectation that a thick stack of geological layers will be exposed in the crater walls, potentially several times the thickness that was previously studied at Endurance and therefore, potentially preserving several times the historical record.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (224 kB) | Large (2.0 MB)
 
This 'right eye' view of 'Victoria' was taken by Opportunity after Sol 950 drive when the Rover was within 20 meters, 66 feet, of the rim of 'Victoria Crater'
'Victoria' After Sol 950 Drive (Right Eye)

A drive of about 30 meters (about 100 feet) on the 950th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's exploration of Mars' Meridiani Planum region (Sept. 25, 2006) brought the NASA rover to within about 20 meters (about 66 feet) of the rim of "Victoria Crater." From that position, the rover's navigation camera took the five exposures combined into this view, which is the right-eye member of a stereo pair. The scalloped shape of the crater is visible on the left edge. Due to a small dune or ripple close to the nearest part of the rim, the scientists and engineers on the rover team planned on sol 951 to drive to the right of the ripple, but not quite all the way to the rim, then to proceed to the rim the following sol. The image is presented in cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Victoria Crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) in diameter, about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is the expectation that a thick stack of geological layers will be exposed in the crater walls, potentially several times the thickness that was previously studied at Endurance and therefore, potentially preserving several times the historical record.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (222 kB) | Large (2.0 MB)
26-Sep-2006
 
 
This panorama image from Opportunity's navigation camera is labeled to highlight features of 'Victoria Crater'
On the Verge of 'Victoria'

Once it was more like a distant dream, the ultimate bonus to an already marvelous Martian mission. Now, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is on the brink of the expansive "Victoria Crater," a depression that truly makes those on the path to it look like dimples. At about 800 meters (nearly half-a-mile) in diameter, Victoria is five times larger then "Endurance Crater."

This image from Opportunity's navigation camera is labeled to highlight features of the large crater. Victoria Crater is informally named for the flagship of Ferdinand Magellan's 16th-Century expedition around the world, and many the features of Victoria will be informally named for places visited by that expedition.

The feature labeled in dark yellow as "Bright Crater" is another crater just outside the far rim of Victoria. At 30 to 40 meters (98 to 131 feet) in diameter, the depression is larger than Opportunity's landing site, "Eagle Crater." Labeled in bright purple is "Duck Crater," a small dimple on the near side of Victoria Crater (the name is used as a placeholder until the team decides if it will name it or not). Other distant craters are labeled in bright blue.

On the far right of the image is "Kitty Clyde's Sister," a highly degraded crater informally named for a boat in John Wesley Powell's 19th-Century expedition through the Grand Canyon.

The science and engineering teams are strategizing on the best way to approach, and possibly enter, Victoria Crater.

This image was taken on the rover's 943th sol on Mars (Sept. 18, 2006).

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (336 kB) | Large (2.5 MB)
22-Sep-2006
 
 
This image is a left eye Pancam Peek into 'Victoria Crater'
Pancam Peek into 'Victoria Crater' (Left Eye)

A drive of about 60 meters (about 200 feet) on the 943rd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's exploration of Mars' Meridiani Planum region (Sept. 18, 2006) brought the NASA rover to within about 50 meters (about 160 feet) of the rim of "Victoria Crater." This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months. Opportunity reached a location from which the cameras on top of the rover's mast could begin to see into the interior of Victoria. This mosaic was made from four frames taken on sol 943 by the panoramic camera (Pancam). It is the left-eye member of a stereo pair showing the upper portion of interior crater walls facing toward Opportunity from up to about 850 meters (half a mile) away. The amount of vertical relief visible at the top of the interior walls from this angle is about 15 meters (about 50 feet). The exposures were taken through a Pancam filter selecting wavelengths centered on 750 nanometers.

Victoria Crater is about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is the expectation that a thick stack of geological layers will be exposed in the crater walls, potentially several times the thickness that was previously studied at Endurance and therefore, potentially preserving several times the historical record.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (275 kB) | Large (1.7 MB)
 
This image is a stero Pancam Peek into 'Victoria Crater'
Pancam Peek into 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)

A drive of about 60 meters (about 200 feet) on the 943rd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's exploration of Mars' Meridiani Planum region (Sept. 18, 2006) brought the NASA rover to within about 50 meters (about 160 feet) of the rim of "Victoria Crater." This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months. Opportunity reached a location from which the cameras on top of the rover's mast could begin to see into the interior of Victoria. This stereo anaglyph was made from frames taken on sol 943 by the panoramic camera (Pancam) to offer a three-dimensional view when seen through red-blue glasses. It shows the upper portion of interior crater walls facing toward Opportunity from up to about 850 meters (half a mile) away. The amount of vertical relief visible at the top of the interior walls from this angle is about 15 meters (about 50 feet). The exposures were taken through a Pancam filter selecting wavelengths centered on 750 nanometers.

Victoria Crater is about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is the expectation that a thick stack of geological layers will be exposed in the crater walls, potentially several times the thickness that was previously studied at Endurance and therefore, potentially preserving several times the historical record.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (311 kB) | Large (3.3 MB)
 
This image is a right eye Pancam Peek into 'Victoria Crater'
Pancam Peek into 'Victoria Crater' (Right Eye)

A drive of about 60 meters (about 200 feet) on the 943rd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's exploration of Mars' Meridiani Planum region (Sept. 18, 2006) brought the NASA rover to within about 50 meters (about 160 feet) of the rim of "Victoria Crater." This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months. Opportunity reached a location from which the cameras on top of the rover's mast could begin to see into the interior of Victoria. This mosaic was made from four frames taken on sol 943 by the panoramic camera (Pancam). It is the right-eye member of a stereo pair showing the upper portion of interior crater walls facing toward Opportunity from up to about 850 meters (half a mile) away. The amount of vertical relief visible at the top of the interior walls from this angle is about 15 meters (about 50 feet). The exposures were taken through a Pancam filter selecting wavelengths centered on 750 nanometers.

Victoria Crater is about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is the expectation that a thick stack of geological layers will be exposed in the crater walls, potentially several times the thickness that was previously studied at Endurance and therefore, potentially preserving several times the historical record.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (283 kB) | Large (1.8 MB)
19-Sep-2006
 
 
This mosic image was taken by Opportunity's navigation camera.  The image reveals the upper portion of 'Victoria Crater's' interior walls
Opportunity's First Glimpse into 'Victoria Crater'

A drive of about 60 meters (about 200 feet) on the 943rd Martian day of Opportunity's exploration of Mars' Meridiani Planum region (Sept. 18, 2006) brought the NASA rover to within about 50 meters (about 160 feet) of the rim of "Victoria Crater," the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months. Opportunity reached a location from which the navigation camera on top of the rover's mast could begin to see into the interior of Victoria. This mosaic of five frames taken by the navigation camera reveals the upper portion of interior crater walls facing toward Opportunity from up to about 850 meters (half a mile) away. The amount of vertical relief visible at the top of the interior walls from this angle is about 15 meters (about 50 feet).

Victoria Crater is about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is the expectation that a thick stack of geological layers will be exposed in the crater walls, potentially several times the thickness that was previously studied at Endurance and therefore, potentially preserving several times the historical record.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (210 kB) | Large (1.9 MB)
13-Sep-2006
 
 
This image shows Opportunity's one of last stop on the surface of Meridiani Planum before reaching different terrains associated with the very large 'Victoria Crater.' In the center of the mosaic is 'Beagle Crater.'
Of Craters and Erosion: Opportunity Examines "Beagle"

This 360-degree view shows one of Opportunity's last stops on the now-familiar surface of Meridiani Planum before reaching different terrains associated with the very large "Victoria Crater." In the center of the mosaic is "Beagle Crater," an impact crater about 35 meters (115 feet) wide. On the far left and wrapping around to the far right, Opportunity's tracks are visible approaching the crater.

Though it looks relatively fresh in orbital images, from a closer vantage point Beagle Crater appears moderately eroded. The crater walls are slumped and the middle of the crater bowl is filled with rippled sand. However, a slightly raised crater rim remains, and in a few places (for instance, on the inside left wall), cliffs of outcrop appear to be preserved in the crater. Ejected rocks from Beagle Crater surround the rover, many with the distinctive, fine-grained layering commonly seen in the rocks of Meridiani Planum. Many of these rocks have surfaces smoothed by wind erosion. Wind erosion also formed the sand drifts nestled among the rocks.

Because impact craters have well-understood shapes when they form, the altered appearance of eroded craters gives scientists clues to the processes that modified them. By observing how filled an impact crater has become and how worn its edges are, scientists can estimate how long its surface has been exposed to erosion. The many-sided outline of a crater such as Beagle and the blocky appearance of its ejecta may also tell scientists about the strength of the underlying bedrock. Based on observations such as these, scientists know that Beagle Crater is fresher than "Eagle" and "Fram" craters near Opportunity's landing site and more similar in form to "Viking" and "Voyager" craters in the plains to the north of Beagle.

Opportunity made other observations at Beagle Crater, such as spectroscopic measurements taken with the panoramic camera and the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, to help scientists assess the composition of the rocks and determine whether Beagle Crater was excavated into the surface rocks of Meridiani Planum or into the ejecta blanket of Victoria Crater.

Beagle Crater takes its unofficial name from a great ship of exploration, the HMS Beagle, whose most famous passenger was British naturalist Charles Darwin. During the Beagle expedition around the world, Darwin conducted many of the observations that led to his theory of natural selection. Scientists have unofficially named many rocks and features in the area of Beagle Crater after the Galapagos Islands and the varieties of finches Darwin observed there. The name Beagle Crater also commemorates the ill-fated British lander, Beagle 2, reminding us how difficult space exploration can be.

Opportunity took the mosaic of images that make up this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings with the panoramic camera on the rover's 901st through 904th sols, or Martian days (Aug. 6 through Aug. 9, 2006), of exploration. This is an approximate true-color image combining exposures taken through the panoramic camera's 753-nanometer, 535-namometer, and 432-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/UNM
Browse Image | Medium Image (155 kB) | Large (44.1 MB)

Related Animation (3 MB)
 
This false color image shows one of Opportunity's last stop on the surface of Meridiani Planum before reaching different terrains associated with the very large 'Victoria Crater.' In the center of the mosaic is 'Beagle Crater.'
Of Craters and Erosion: Opportunity Examines "Beagle" (False Color)

This 360-degree view shows one of Opportunity's last stops on the now-familiar surface of Meridiani Planum before reaching different terrains associated with the very large "Victoria Crater." In the center of the mosaic is "Beagle Crater," an impact crater about 35 meters (115 feet) wide. On the far left and wrapping around to the far right, Opportunity's tracks are visible approaching the crater.

Though it looks relatively fresh in orbital images, from a closer vantage point Beagle Crater appears moderately eroded. The crater walls are slumped and the middle of the crater bowl is filled with rippled sand. However, a slightly raised crater rim remains, and in a few places (for instance, on the inside left wall), cliffs of outcrop appear to be preserved in the crater. Ejected rocks from Beagle Crater surround the rover, many with the distinctive, fine-grained layering commonly seen in the rocks of Meridiani Planum. Many of these rocks have surfaces smoothed by wind erosion. Wind erosion also formed the sand drifts nestled among the rocks.

Because impact craters have well-understood shapes when they form, the altered appearance of eroded craters gives scientists clues to the processes that modified them. By observing how filled an impact crater has become and how worn its edges are, scientists can estimate how long its surface has been exposed to erosion. The many-sided outline of a crater such as Beagle and the blocky appearance of its ejecta may also tell scientists about the strength of the underlying bedrock. Based on observations such as these, scientists know that Beagle Crater is fresher than "Eagle" and "Fram" craters near Opportunity's landing site and more similar in form to "Viking" and "Voyager" craters in the plains to the north of Beagle.

Opportunity made other observations at Beagle Crater, such as spectroscopic measurements taken with the panoramic camera and the miniature thermal emission spectrometer, to help scientists assess the composition of the rocks and determine whether Beagle Crater was excavated into the surface rocks of Meridiani Planum or into the ejecta blanket of Victoria Crater.

Beagle Crater takes its unofficial name from a great ship of exploration, the HMS Beagle, whose most famous passenger was British naturalist Charles Darwin. During the Beagle expedition around the world, Darwin conducted many of the observations that led to his theory of natural selection. Scientists have unofficially named many rocks and features in the area of Beagle Crater after the Galapagos Islands and the varieties of finches Darwin observed there. The name Beagle Crater also commemorates the ill-fated British lander, Beagle 2, reminding us how difficult space exploration can be.

Opportunity took the mosaic of images that make up this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings with the panoramic camera on the rover's 901st through 904th sols, or Martian days (Aug. 6 through Aug. 9, 2006), of exploration. This is a false-color image using exposures taken through the panoramic camera's 753-nanometer, 535-namometer, and 432-nanometer filters. The false color emphasizes differences in rock and soil materials.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/UNM
Browse Image | Medium Image (220 kB) | Large (86.7 MB)

Related Animation (5.6 MB)
07-Aug-2006
 
 
This horizontal view of Beagle Crater shows a ripple of sand on a rocky surface extending from the foreground at the bottom of the panorama toward a laterally extensive mosaic of reddish-brown rocks that form the rim of a shallow bowl-shaped indentation in the surface. The rocks on the interior of the rim facing the rover have relatively smooth surfaces that make up the hollowed-out interior of the bowl. Beyond the uplifted rim is a flat expanse of plains bounded on top by a pinkish-brown sky. In this false-color view, sand and ripples between and on top of rocks is light blue; the rocks are mostly light tan to white except for a few dark brown boulders.
Opportunity Approaches the Bowl of Beagle Crater

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired this false-color image of the rim of the 35-meter (115-foot) diameter Beagle Crater on Martian day, or sol, 894 (July 30, 2006) using the panoramic camera's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters. At the time the rover was about 25 meters (82 feet) from Beagle Crater, looking east-southeast. The image reveals ejecta blocks near the rover, the largest of which is about 50 centimeters (20 inches) across. The image also shows a portion of the eastern interior rim of Beagle Crater, which appears composed of jumbled, angular blocks of brighter and darker outcrop rocks. The rover will drive to the rim of Beagle and acquire an extensive color panorama of the crater rim and interior in the coming sols.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (228 kB) | Large (2.1 MB)
 
This horizontal view of Beagle Crater shows a ripple of sand on a rocky surface extending from the foreground at the bottom of the panorama toward a laterally extensive mosaic of reddish-brown rocks that form the rim of a shallow bowl-shaped indentation in the surface. The rocks on the interior of the rim facing the rover have relatively smooth surfaces that make up the hollowed-out interior of the bowl. Beyond the uplifted rim is a flat expanse of plains bounded on top by a pinkish-brown sky.
Opportunity Approaches the Bowl of Beagle Crater (True Color)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity took this approximate true-color image of Beagle Crater from a distance of about 25 meters (82 feet). The crater is thought to be relatively young based on its prominent, raised rim and surrounding ejecta that have not been eroded away or buried by sand. The image also shows a portion of the eastern interior rim of Beagle Crater, which appears composed of jumbled, angular blocks of brighter and darker outcrop rocks. The rover will drive to the rim of the crater and acquire an extensive color panorama in the coming sols.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (139 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
10-Jul-2006
 
 
This panoramic image shows a captured a sweeping image of 'Burns Cliff'
'Burns Cliff' in Color Stereo

The panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured a sweeping image of "Burns Cliff" after driving right to the base of this southeastern portion of the inner wall of "Endurance Crater" in November 2004. This view is a color stereo anaglyph, offering a three-dimensionsal quality when seen properly through red/blue glasses. It incorporates imagery released previously (PIA07110). The image combines frames taken between the rover's 287th and 294th Martian days (Nov. 13 to 20, 2004). It spans about 180 degrees from side to side. Because of this wide-angle view, the cliff walls appear to bulge out toward the camera. In reality the walls form a gently curving, continuous surface.

Image credit: NSA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (488 kB) | Large (7.7 MB)
28-Jun-2006
 
 
2 pancams showing 'Beagle Crater' on Opp's horizon: first is vertically-stretched and second is regular pancam. (Unlabeled)
Stretched View Showing 'Beagle Crater' (Unlabeled)

This imagery from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the outcrop-rimmed "Beagle Crater" appearing on the horizon as Opportunity approaches it. The top version is vertically stretched to make horizon details easier to see. The lower version has normal proportions. The image is a mosaic of frames taken during Opportunity's 855th Martian day, or sol (June 20, 2006).

Beagle Crater is 35 meters (115 feet) in diameter. The Opportunity science and engineering teams hope to have the rover visit it on the way to "Victoria Crater." Beagle Crater was 310 meters (1,107 feet) away from Opportunity when this picture was taken. Even at this distance, blocks of ejecta can be seen around the prominent, raised rim of Beagle crater, suggesting that it may be among the youngest craters visited by Opportunity.

When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created this vertically-stretched image (top). The stretched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team.

Though difficult to discern without labels, the southeast rim of Victoria Crater is visible, as well as two small craters on the dark "annulus," or ring, around Victoria Crater.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/Cornell University
Browse Image | Medium Image (346 kB) | Large (1.4 MB)
 
2 pancams showing 'Beagle Crater' on Opp's horizon: first is vertically-stretched and second is regular pancam.
Stretched View Showing 'Beagle Crater'

This imagery from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the outcrop-rimmed "Beagle Crater" appearing on the horizon as Opportunity approaches it. The top version is vertically stretched to make horizon details easier to see. The lower version has normal proportions. The image is a mosaic of frames taken during Opportunity's 855th Martian day, or sol (June 20, 2006).

Beagle Crater is 35 meters (115 feet) in diameter. The Opportunity science and engineering teams hope to have the rover visit it on the way to "Victoria Crater." Beagle Crater was 310 meters (1,107 feet) away from Opportunity when this picture was taken. Even at this distance, blocks of ejecta can be seen around the prominent, raised rim of Beagle crater, suggesting that it may be among the youngest craters visited by Opportunity.

When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created this vertically-stretched image (top). The stretched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team. The bright white dot on the horizon near the upper left corner of the panorama, labeled "Outcrop Promontory," was thought to be a light-toned outcrop on the far wall of Victoria, based on a single azimuth measurement on sol 804 (April 28, 2006), suggesting that the rover was seeing over the low rim of Victoria. But comparing the azimuth angle of this feature in the sol 855 panorama and the angle of the same feature in the sol 804 panoramic image [PIA08446] (a process known as triangulation) revealed that this outcrop must instead be on the near rim of the crater.

The southeast rim of Victoria is labeled in bright green. The northeast rim is beyond the left edge of this panorama. The salmon-color lines and arrows highlight two small craters on the dark "annulus," or ring, around Victoria Crater.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/Cornell University
Browse Image | Medium Image (464 kB) | Large (2.1 MB)
24-May-2006
 
 
This panoramic image shows the view from Opportunity on the rovers 817th Martian Day, May 12, 2006.  The image shows the large ripple that Opportunity will have to navigate through as it makes its way towards 'Victoria Crater'
Opportunity's Outcrop Outing

This composite of three images from the navigation camera shows the view from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity toward the southeast, in the direction of "Victoria Crater," on the rover's 817th Martian day, or sol (May 12, 2006). To reach Victoria Crater, still about 1,100 meters (two-thirds of a mile) from this location, the rover must navigate among the large ripples visible on the left and ahead in the distance.

On this sol, Opportunity was preparing to deploy its arm instrument suite to analyze a rock on the outcrop pavement. At upper right is a small depression that was the target of further imaging on sols 825 and 826 (May 20 and 21, 2006).

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (367 kB) | Large (906 kB)
05-May-2006
 
 
This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of 'Victoria Crater,' which it has been approaching for more than a year.
Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of "Victoria Crater," which it has been approaching for more than a year.

Engineers on the rover team were unsure whether Opportunity would make it as far as Victoria, but scientists hoped for the chance to study such a large crater with their roving geologist. Victoria Crater is 800 meters (nearly half a mile) in diameter, about six times wider than "Endurance Crater," where Opportunity spent several months in 2004 examining rock layers affected by ancient water.

When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created a vertically-stretched image (top) from a mosaic of regular frames from the panoramic camera (bottom), taken on Opportunity's 804th Martian day (April 29, 2006).

The streched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team.

The bright white dot near the horizon to the right of center, labeled "Outcrop Promontory," (barely visible without labeling or zoom-in) is thought to be a light-toned outcrop on the far wall of the crater, suggesting that the rover can see over the low rim of Victoria. The northeast and southeast rims are labeled in bright green. Finally, the light purple lines and arrow highlight a small crater.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/Cornell University
Browse Image | Medium Image (433 kB) | Large (2 MB)
 
This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of 'Victoria Crater,' which it has been approaching for more than a year.
Stretched View Showing 'Victoria' (Unlabeled)

This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of "Victoria Crater," which it has been approaching for more than a year.

Engineers on the rover team were unsure whether Opportunity would make it as far as Victoria, but scientists hoped for the chance to study such a large crater with their roving geologist. Victoria Crater is 800 meters (nearly half a mile) in diameter, about six times wider than "Endurance Crater," where Opportunity spent several months in 2004 examining rock layers affected by ancient water.

When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created a vertically-stretched image (top) from a mosaic of regular frames from the panoramic camera (bottom), taken on Opportunity's 804th Martian day (April 29, 2006).

The streched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team.

The bright white dot near the horizon to the right of center (barely visible without labeling or zoom-in) is thought to be a light-toned outcrop on the far wall of the crater, suggesting that the rover can see over the low rim of Victoria.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/Cornell University
Browse Image | Medium Image (329 kB) | Large (1.4 MB)
07-Mar-2006
 
 
This false color panorama image of the 'Payson' outcrop on the western edge of 'Erebus' Crater was taken during Opportunity's sol 744.
'Payson' Panorama in False Color

The panoramic camera aboard NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired this panorama of the "Payson" outcrop on the western edge of "Erebus" Crater during Opportunity's sol 744 (Feb. 26, 2006). From this vicinity at the northern end of the outcrop, layered rocks are observed in the crater wall, which is about 1 meters (3.3 feet) thick. The view also shows rocks disrupted by the crater-forming impact event and subjected to erosion over time.

To the left of the outcrop, a flat, thin layer of spherule-rich soils overlies more outcrop materials. The rover is currently traveling down this "road" and observing the approximately 25-meter (82-foot) length of the outcrop prior to departing Erebus crater.

The panorama camera took 28 separate exposures of this scene, using four different filters. The resulting panorama covers about 90 degrees of terrain around the rover. This false-color rendering was made using the camera's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer and 423-nanometer filters. Using false color enhances the subtle color differences between layers of rocks and soils in the scene so that scientists can better analyze them. Image-to-image seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (417 kB) | Large (8.3 MB)
 
This panorama image of the 'Payson' outcrop on the western edge of 'Erebus' Crater was taken during Opportunity's sol 744.
'Payson' Panorama by Opportunity

The panoramic camera aboard NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired this panorama of the "Payson" outcrop on the western edge of "Erebus" Crater during Opportunity's sol 744 (Feb. 26, 2006). From this vicinity at the northern end of the outcrop, layered rocks are observed in the crater wall, which is about 1 meters (3.3 feet) thick. The view also shows rocks disrupted by the crater-forming impact event and subjected to erosion over time.

To the left of the outcrop, a flat, thin layer of spherule-rich soils overlies more outcrop materials. The rover is currently traveling down this "road" and observing the approximately 25-meter (82-foot) length of the outcrop prior to departing Erebus crater.

The panorama camera took 28 separate exposures of this scene, using four different filters. The resulting panorama covers about 90 degrees of terrain around the rover. This approximately true-color rendering was made using the camera's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer and 423-nanometer filters. Image-to-image seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (325 kB) | Large (6.3 MB)
17-Feb-2006
 
 
This image shows a detailed structure of a small fin-like structure dubbed 'Roosevelt,' which sticks out from the outcrop pavement at the edge of 'Erebus Crater.'
Revealing Roosevelt

This image mosaic from the microscopic imager aboard NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows detailed structure of a small fin-like structure dubbed "Roosevelt," which sticks out from the outcrop pavement at the edge of "Erebus Crater."

Roosevelt lines a fracture in the local pavement and scientists hypothesize that it is a fracture fill, formed by water that percolated through the fracture. This would mean the feature is younger than surrounding rocks and, therefore, might provide evidence of water that was present some time after the formation of Meridiani Planum sedimentary rocks.

The image shows fine laminations (layers about 1 millimeter or .04 inch thick) that run parallel to the axis of the fin. Some of the textures visible in the image likely indicate that minerals precipitated from the outcrop rocks, but sediment grains are also apparent.

The three frames combined into this mosaic were taken during Opportunity's 727th Martian day, or sol (Feb. 8, 2006). In subsequent days, the rover completed textural and chemical inspection of Roosevelt to help the science team understand this structure's significance for Martian history.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS
Browse Image | Medium Image (275 kB) | Large (1.4 MB)
25-Jan-2006
 
 
This panorama image shows the landscape surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at the edge of 'Erebus Crater'
Erebus Panorama in Stereo

This stereo view shows the landscape surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at the edge of "Erebus Crater" while the rover's panoramic camera captured frames for a full-circle panorama on Opportunity's sols 652 to 663 (Nov. 23 to Dec. 5, 2005 ). The scene includes finely-layered outcrop rocks, wind ripples, and small cobbles and grains along the rim of the wide but shallow crater. The full panorama, including more of the rover deck than shown here, is at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03270.

This image appears three dimensional when viewed through red and blue glasses with a red left eye and blue right eye. Both the left and right images were taken through blue filters. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (178 kB) | Large (80.0 MB)
 
This panorama image shows the landscape surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at the edge of 'Erebus Crater' The image was taken through the camera's left-eye blue filter
Erebus Panorama (Left Eye)

This is the left-eye member of a stereo pair showing the landscape surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at the edge of "Erebus Crater" while the rover's panoramic camera captured frames for a full-circle panorama on Opportunity's sols 652 to 663 (Nov. 23 to Dec. 5, 2005 ). The scene includes finely-layered outcrop rocks, wind ripples, and small cobbles and grains along the rim of the wide but shallow crater. The full panorama, including more of the rover deck than shown here, is at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03270.

This view is a mosaic of images taken through the camera's left-eye blue filter. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (168 kB) | Large (42.2 MB)
 
This image is the right-eye member of a stereo pair showing the landscape surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at the edge of 'Erebus Crater'
Erebus Panorama (Right Eye)

This is the right-eye member of a stereo pair showing the landscape surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at the edge of "Erebus Crater" while the rover's panoramic camera captured frames for a full-circle panorama on Opportunity's sols 652 to 663 (Nov. 23 to Dec. 5, 2005 ). The scene includes finely-layered outcrop rocks, wind ripples, and small cobbles and grains along the rim of the wide but shallow crater. The full panorama, including more of the rover deck than shown here, is at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03270.

This view is a mosaic of images taken through the camera's right-eye blue filter. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (172 kB) | Large (42.9 MB)
 
This image is the left-eye member of a color stereo pair showing the landscape surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at the edge of 'Erebus Crater'
Erebus Panorama (Left Eye in Color)

This is the left-eye member of a color stereo pair showing the landscape surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at the edge of "Erebus Crater" while the rover's panoramic camera captured frames for a full-circle panorama on Opportunity's sols 652 to 663 (Nov. 23 to Dec. 5, 2005 ). The scene includes finely-layered outcrop rocks, wind ripples, and small cobbles and grains along the rim of the wide but shallow crater. The full panorama, including more of the rover deck than shown here, is at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03270.

This view is a composite of images taken through the camera's left lens using 430-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 750-nanometer filters. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (220 kB) | Large (68.6 MB)
 
This image is the right-eye member of a color stereo pair showing the landscape surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at the edge of 'Erebus Crater'
Erebus Panorama (Right Eye in Color)

This is the right-eye member of a color stereo pair showing the landscape surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at the edge of "Erebus Crater" while the rover's panoramic camera captured frames for a full-circle panorama on Opportunity's sols 652 to 663 (Nov. 23 to Dec. 5, 2005 ). The scene includes finely-layered outcrop rocks, wind ripples, and small cobbles and grains along the rim of the wide but shallow crater. The full panorama, including more of the rover deck than shown here, is at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03270.

This view is a composite of images taken through the camera's right lens using 430-nanometer and 750-nanometer filters. It presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (227 kB) | Large (60.4 MB)
04-Jan-2006
 
 
This image shows the 'Erebus' crater.
On the Rim of 'Erebus'

This is the Opportunity panoramic camera's "Erebus Rim" panorama, acquired on sols 652 to 663 (Nov. 23 to Dec. 5, 2005 ), as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was exploring sand dunes and outcrop rocks in Meridiani Planum. The panorama originally consisted of 635 separate images in 4 different Pancam filters, and covers 360 degrees of terrain around the rover and the full rover deck. Since the time that this panorama was acquired, and while engineers have been diagnosing and testing Opportunity's robotic arm, the panorama has been expanded to include more than 1,300 images of this terrain through all of the Pancam multispectral filters. It is the largest panorama acquired by either rover during the mission.

The panorama shown here is an approximate true-color rendering using Pancam's 750 nanometer, 530 nanometer and 430 nanometer filters. It is presented here as a cylindrical projection. Image-to-image seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

This panorama provides the team's highest resolution view yet of the finely-layered outcrop rocks, wind ripples, and small cobbles and grains along the rim of the wide but shallow "Erebus" crater. Once the arm diagnostics and testing are completed, the team hopes to explore other layered outcrop rocks at Erebus and then eventually continue southward toward the large crater known as "Victoria."

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (37 kB) | Large (74.4 MB)

JPL Image Use Policy

USA.gov
PRIVACY    |     FAQ    |     SITEMAP    |     CREDITS