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Panoramas: Spirit
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13-Dec-2004
 
 
View of Spirit's Climb from Six Months Earlier
View of Spirit's Climb from Six Months Earlier

This view from where Spirit stood on its 149th martian day (June 3, 2004) shows, on the hillside at the center of the image, the terrain that the rover is crossing six months later. The view is a mosaic of several frames taken with Spirit's panoramic camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (138 kB) | Large (1 MB)
 
Spirit Journey Continues at 'Husband Hill'
Spirit Journey Continues at "Husband Hill"

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has left the "West Spur" of the "Columbia Hills" and crossed a flatter saddle to the main body of "Husband Hill." The rover's course from the 313th to 330th martian days, or sols, of its mission (Nov. 19 to Dec. 6, 2004) is indicated on a mosaic view made from images taken with Spirit's panoramic camera on sol 149 (June 3, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/NMMNH
Browse Image (151 kB) | Large (435 kB)
23-Nov-2004
 
 
Track of Right-Wheel Drag
Track of Right-Wheel Drag

This 360-degree panorama combines several frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 313th martian day (Nov. 19, 2004). The site, labeled Spirit site 93, is in the "Columbia Hills" inside Gusev Crater. The rover tracks point westward. Spirit had driven eastward, in reverse and dragging its right front wheel, for about 30 meters (100 feet) on the day the picture was taken. Driving backwards while dragging that wheel is a precautionary strategy to extend the usefulness of the wheel for when it is most needed, because it has developed more friction than the other wheels. The right-hand track in this look backwards shows how the dragging disturbed the soil. This view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (287 kB) | Large (3.7 MB)
 
Track of Right-Wheel Drag (3-D)
Track of Right-Wheel Drag (3-D)

This 360-degree stereo panorama combines several frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 313th martian day (Nov. 19, 2004). The site, labeled Spirit site 93, is in the "Columbia Hills" inside Gusev Crater. The rover tracks point westward. Spirit had driven eastward, in reverse and dragging its right front wheel, for about 30 meters (100 feet) on the day the picture was taken. Driving backwards while dragging that wheel is a precautionary strategy to extend the usefulness of the wheel for when it is most needed, because it has developed more friction than the other wheels. The right-hand track in this look backwards shows how the dragging disturbed the soil. This view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (368 kB) | Large (7.8 MB)
 
Track of Right-Wheel Drag (Left Eye)
Track of Right-Wheel Drag (Left Eye)

This 360-degree panorama combines several frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 313th martian day (Nov. 19, 2004). The site, labeled Spirit site 93, is in the "Columbia Hills" inside Gusev Crater. The rover tracks point westward. Spirit had driven eastward, in reverse and dragging its right front wheel, for about 30 meters (100 feet) on the day the picture was taken. Driving backwards while dragging that wheel is a precautionary strategy to extend the usefulness of the wheel for when it is most needed, because it has developed more friction than the other wheels. The right-hand track in this look backwards shows how the dragging disturbed the soil. This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, and is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (291 kB) | Large (3.9 MB)
 
Track of Right-Wheel Drag (Right Eye)
Track of Right-Wheel Drag (Right Eye)

This 360-degree panorama combines several frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 313th martian day (Nov. 19, 2004). The site, labeled Spirit site 93, is in the "Columbia Hills" inside Gusev Crater. The rover tracks point westward. Spirit had driven eastward, in reverse and dragging its right front wheel, for about 30 meters (100 feet) on the day the picture was taken. Driving backwards while dragging that wheel is a precautionary strategy to extend the usefulness of the wheel for when it is most needed, because it has developed more friction than the other wheels. The right-hand track in this look backwards shows how the dragging disturbed the soil. This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, and is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (285 kB) | Large (3.9 MB)
 
Track of Right-Wheel Drag (Polar)
Track of Right-Wheel Drag (Polar)

This 360-degree panorama combines several frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 313th martian day (Nov. 19, 2004). The site, labeled Spirit site 93, is in the "Columbia Hills" inside Gusev Crater. The rover tracks point westward. Spirit had driven eastward, in reverse and dragging its right front wheel, for about 30 meters (100 feet) on the day the picture was taken. Driving backwards while dragging that wheel is a precautionary strategy to extend the usefulness of the wheel for when it is most needed, because it has developed more friction than the other wheels. The right-hand track in this look backwards shows how the dragging disturbed the soil. This view is presented in a polar projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (708 kB) | Large (4.4 MB)
 
Track of Right-Wheel Drag (Vertical)
Track of Right-Wheel Drag (Vertical)

This 360-degree panorama combines several frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 313th martian day (Nov. 19, 2004). The site, labeled Spirit site 93, is in the "Columbia Hills" inside Gusev Crater. The rover tracks point westward. Spirit had driven eastward, in reverse and dragging its right front wheel, for about 30 meters (100 feet) on the day the picture was taken. Driving backwards while dragging that wheel is a precautionary strategy to extend the usefulness of the wheel for when it is most needed, because it has developed more friction than the other wheels. The right-hand track in this look backwards shows how the dragging disturbed the soil. This view is presented in a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (242 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
21-Oct-2004
 
 
A Rocky Rim Around 'Bonneville' in 3-D
A Rocky Rim Around 'Bonneville' in 3-D

This stereo view was taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the rover's 82nd martian day, or sol (March 27, 2004). At that point in its primary mission, Spirit was investigating a rock called "Mazatzal" on the rim of "Bonneville Crater." The image shows rocky terrain surrounding the crater. The rover had to pick its way through that terrain on its way to the "Columbia Hills," in the distance on the left. Rolling terrain is apparent in the mid-distance. Barely visible to the right of the hills is the outline of the distant rim of Gusev Crater.

This View is presented as cylindrical-perspective projection. It combines images from the left and right eyes of the panoramic camera, taken through blue filters on both sides.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (99 kB) | Large (2.3 MB)
 
A Rocky Rim Around 'Bonneville' (Left Eye)
A Rocky Rim Around 'Bonneville' (Left Eye)

This view was taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the rover's 82nd martian day, or sol (March 27, 2004). At that point in its primary mission, Spirit was investigating a rock called "Mazatzal" on the rim of "Bonneville Crater."

This image is the left-eye half of a stereo pair. It shows rocky terrain surrounding the crater. The rover had to pick its way through that terrain on its way to the "Columbia Hills," in the distance on the left. Rolling terrain is apparent in the mid-distance. Barely visible to the right of the hills is the outline of the distant rim of Gusev Crater.

This View, taken through a blue filter, is presented as cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (73 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
 
A Rocky Rim Around 'Bonneville' (Right Eye)
A Rocky Rim Around 'Bonneville' (Right Eye)

This view was taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the rover's 82nd martian day, or sol (March 27, 2004). At that point in its primary mission, Spirit was investigating a rock called "Mazatzal" on the rim of "Bonneville Crater."

This image is the right-eye half of a stereo pair. It shows rocky terrain surrounding the crater. The rover had to pick its way through that terrain on its way to the "Columbia Hills," in the distance on the left. Rolling terrain is apparent in the mid-distance. Barely visible to the right of the hills is the outline of the distant rim of Gusev Crater.

This View, taken through a blue filter, is presented as cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (78.3 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
 
Eyeing the Drive Ahead After 'Bonneville' (3-D)
Eyeing the Drive Ahead After 'Bonneville' (3-D)

This stereo view was taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the rover's 87th martian day, or sol (April 1, 2004), just after Spirit left "Bonneville Crater." It shows the terrain to be covered in the trek towards the "Columbia Hills" in the background. Barely visible to the right of the hills is the outline of the distant rim of Gusev Crater.

This image is a stereo anaglyph in cylindrical-perspective projection. It combines images from the left and right eyes of the panoramic camera, taken through blue filters on both sides.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (83.8 kB) | Large (2.7 MB)
 
Eyeing the Drive Ahead After 'Bonneville' (Left Eye)
Eyeing the Drive Ahead After 'Bonneville' (Left Eye)

This view was taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the rover's 87th martian day, or sol (April 1, 2004), just after Spirit left "Bonneville Crater." It is the left-eye half of a stereo pair. It shows the terrain to be covered in the trek towards the "Columbia Hills" in the background. Barely visible to the right of the hills is the outline of the distant rim of Gusev Crater.

This image, taken through a blue filter, is presented in cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (67.4 kB) | Large (1.4 MB)
 
Eyeing the Drive Ahead After 'Bonneville' (Right Eye)
Eyeing the Drive Ahead After 'Bonneville' (Right Eye)

This view was taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the rover's 87th martian day, or sol (April 1, 2004), just after Spirit left "Bonneville Crater." It is the right-eye half of a stereo pair. It shows the terrain to be covered in the trek towards the "Columbia Hills" in the background. Barely visible to the right of the hills is the outline of the distant rim of Gusev Crater.

This image, taken through a blue filter, is presented in cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (70.4 kB) | Large (1.5 MB)
20-Oct-2004
 
 
'Columbia Hills' in Stereo
'Columbia Hills' in Stereo

While en route to higher ground in the "Columbia Hills," NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree stereo panorama of its surroundings. Because the rover was parked on a steep slope, it was tilted approximately 22 degrees to the west-northwest. This would be similar to tilting your body sideways like a leaning pole and turning your body and head around to survey your surroundings without bending your neck. At one point, you would be looking slightly down. At another point, you would be looking slightly up. In between those two points, your eyes would be slanted at an angle to the horizon. To compensate for this, image processing experts "untilted" the images, so to speak, which makes the martian horizon appear flat but also creates a vertical offset between the left and right eyes. This offset can make it difficult to view a scene like this looking through 3-D glasses because the two sides of the stereo image do not line up perfectly. Tilting your head one way or the other may help to view it more easily.

The highest point visible in this panorama is "Husband Hill," named for space shuttle Columbia Commander Rick Husband. To the right are the rover's tracks through the soil, where it stopped to perform maintenance on its right front wheel in July. In the distance, below the hills, is the floor of Gusev Crater, where Spirit landed Jan. 3, 2004, before traveling more than 3 kilometers (1.8 miles) to reach this point. This vista comprises 188 images taken between Spirit's 213th day, or sol, on Mars to its 223rd sol (Aug. 9 to 19, 2004). Team members at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Cornell University spent several weeks processing images and producing geometric maps to stitch all the images together in this mosaic. The 360-degree view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective map projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (57.6 kB) | Large (1.8 MB)
 
'Columbia Hills' in Stereo (Left Eye)
'Columbia Hills' in Stereo (Left Eye)

This is the panoramic camera left-eye view from a stereo pair of images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover in the "Columbia Hills."

The highest point visible in this panorama is "Husband Hill," named for space shuttle Columbia Commander Rick Husband. To the right are the rover's tracks through the soil, where it stopped to perform maintenance on its right front wheel in July. In the distance, below the hills, is the floor of Gusev Crater, where Spirit landed Jan. 3, 2004, before traveling more than 3 kilometers (1.8 miles) to reach this point. This vista comprises 188 images taken between Spirit's 213th day, or sol, on Mars to its 223rd sol (Aug. 9 to 19, 2004). Team members at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Cornell University spent several weeks processing images and producing geometric maps to stitch all the images together in this mosaic. The 360-degree view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective map projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (48 kB) | Large (879 kB)
 
'Columbia Hills' in Stereo (Right Eye)
'Columbia Hills' in Stereo (Right Eye)

This is the panoramic camera right-eye view from a stereo pair of images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover in the "Columbia Hills."

The highest point visible in this panorama is "Husband Hill," named for space shuttle Columbia Commander Rick Husband. To the right are the rover's tracks through the soil, where it stopped to perform maintenance on its right front wheel in July. In the distance, below the hills, is the floor of Gusev Crater, where Spirit landed Jan. 3, 2004, before traveling more than 3 kilometers (1.8 miles) to reach this point. This vista comprises 188 images taken between Spirit's 213th day, or sol, on Mars to its 223rd sol (Aug. 9 to 19, 2004). Team members at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Cornell University spent several weeks processing images and producing geometric maps to stitch all the images together in this mosaic. The 360-degree view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective map projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (46 kB) | Large (889 kB)
 
True 3-D View of 'Columbia Hills' from an Angle
True 3-D View of 'Columbia Hills' from an Angle

This mosaic of images from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a panorama of the "Columbia Hills" without any adjustment for rover tilt. When viewed through 3-D glasses, depth is much more dramatic and easier to see, compared with a tilt-adjusted version. This is because stereo views are created by producing two images, one corresponding to the view from the panoramic camera's left-eye camera, the other corresponding to the view from the panoramic camera's right-eye camera. The brain processes the visual input more accurately when the two images do not have any vertical offset. In this view, the vertical alignment is nearly perfect, but the horizon appears to curve because of the rover's tilt (because the rover was parked on a steep slope, it was tilted approximately 22 degrees to the west-northwest). Spirit took the images for this 360-degree panorama while en route to higher ground in the "Columbia Hills."

The highest point visible in the hills is "Husband Hill," named for space shuttle Columbia Commander Rick Husband. To the right are the rover's tracks through the soil, where it stopped to perform maintenance on its right front wheel in July. In the distance, below the hills, is the floor of Gusev Crater, where Spirit landed Jan. 3, 2004, before traveling more than 3 kilometers (1.8 miles) to reach this point. This vista comprises 188 images taken by Spirit's panoramic camera from its 213th day, or sol, on Mars to its 223rd sol (Aug. 9 to 19, 2004). Team members at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Cornell University spent several weeks processing images and producing geometric maps to stitch all the images together in this mosaic. The 360-degree view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective map projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (461 kB) | Large (11.6 MB)
 
True 3-D View of 'Columbia Hills' from an Angle (Left Eye)
True 3-D View of 'Columbia Hills' from an Angle (Left Eye)

This is the panoramic camera left-eye view from a stereo pair of images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit in the "Columbia Hills," without adjustment for the tilt of the rover.

The highest point visible in the hills is "Husband Hill," named for space shuttle Columbia Commander Rick Husband. To the right are the rover's tracks through the soil, where it stopped to perform maintenance on its right front wheel in July. In the distance, below the hills, is the floor of Gusev Crater, where Spirit landed Jan. 3, 2004, before traveling more than 3 kilometers (1.8 miles) to reach this point. This vista comprises 188 images taken by Spirit's panoramic camera from its 213th day, or sol, on Mars to its 223rd sol (Aug. 9 to 19, 2004). Team members at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Cornell University spent several weeks processing images and producing geometric maps to stitch all the images together in this mosaic. The 360-degree view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective map projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (332 kB) | Large (10.8 MB)
 
True 3-D View of 'Columbia Hills' from an Angle (Right Eye)
True 3-D View of 'Columbia Hills' from an Angle (Right Eye)

This is the panoramic camera right-eye view from a stereo pair of images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit in the "Columbia Hills," without adjustment for the tilt of the rover.

The highest point visible in the hills is "Husband Hill," named for space shuttle Columbia Commander Rick Husband. To the right are the rover's tracks through the soil, where it stopped to perform maintenance on its right front wheel in July. In the distance, below the hills, is the floor of Gusev Crater, where Spirit landed Jan. 3, 2004, before traveling more than 3 kilometers (1.8 miles) to reach this point. This vista comprises 188 images taken by Spirit's panoramic camera from its 213th day, or sol, on Mars to its 223rd sol (Aug. 9 to 19, 2004). Team members at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Cornell University spent several weeks processing images and producing geometric maps to stitch all the images together in this mosaic. The 360-degree view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective map projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (338 kB) | Large (10.7 MB)
19-Oct-2004
 
 
Full-Circle View from Near 'Tetl'
Full-Circle View from Near 'Tetl'

This 360-degree view combines frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 271st martian day, or sol, on Oct. 7, 2004. The rover had just driven into position for using the tools on its robotic arm (not in the picture) to examine a layered rock called "Tetl" in the "Columbia Hills." Spirit's total driving distance from its landing to this point was 3,641 meters (2.26 miles), more than six times the distance set as a criterion for mission success. The view is presented here in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (323 kB) | Large (3.9 MB)
 
Full-Circle View from Near 'Tetl' (3-D)
Full-Circle View from Near 'Tetl' (3-D)

This stereo, 360-degree view combines frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 271st martian day, or sol, on Oct. 7, 2004. The rover had just driven into position for using the tools on its robotic arm (not in the picture) to examine a layered rock called "Tetl" in the "Columbia Hills." Spirit's total driving distance from its landing to this point was 3,641 meters (2.26 miles), more than six times the distance set as a criterion for mission success. This three-dimensional view is presented here in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (421 kB) | Large (8.7 MB)
 
Full-Circle View from Near 'Tetl' (Left Eye)
Full-Circle View from Near 'Tetl' (Left Eye)

This 360-degree view combines frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 271st martian day, or sol, on Oct. 7, 2004. The rover had just driven into position for using the tools on its robotic arm (not in the picture) to examine a layered rock called "Tetl" in the "Columbia Hills." Spirit's total driving distance from its landing to this point was 3,641 meters (2.26 miles), more than six times the distance set as a criterion for mission success. This is the left-eye view of a stereo pair, presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (336 kB) | Large (3.5 MB)
 
Full-Circle View from Near 'Tetl' (Right Eye)
Full-Circle View from Near 'Tetl' (Right Eye)

This 360-degree view combines frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 271st martian day, or sol, on Oct. 7, 2004. The rover had just driven into position for using the tools on its robotic arm (not in the picture) to examine a layered rock called "Tetl" in the "Columbia Hills." Spirit's total driving distance from its landing to this point was 3,641 meters (2.26 miles), more than six times the distance set as a criterion for mission success. This is the right-eye view of a stereo pair, presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (324 kB) | Large (4.5 MB)
07-Oct-2004
 
 
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills'
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills'

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit looked up at the "Columbia Hills" from its location on the 265th martian day, or sol, of its mission (Sept. 30, 2004) and captured this view. This cropped mosaic image, presented here in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction, was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (38 kB) | Medium Image (221 kB) | Large (2.5 MB)
 
'Cahokia' Panorama
'Cahokia' Panorama

This stunning image mosaic of the "Columbia Hills" is the first 360-degree panorama taken since the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit arrived at the hills over a month ago. The rover has been busy studying the rocks here, which show evidence of past alteration by water. The dark patch of soil to the right is the spot where Spirit stopped for engineering work on its right front wheel. Spirit's tracks can be followed from there all the way back to "Bonneville Crater" and the original landing site, more than 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) away.

This approximate true-color image, nicknamed the "Cahokia panorama" after the Native American archaeological site near St. Louis, was acquired between sols 213 to 223 (Aug. 9 to 19, 2004). The panorama consists of 470 images acquired through six panoramic camera filters (750 to 480 nanometers). It took until the week of sol 237 (Sept. 2) to downlink all the data back to Earth. Several more weeks of image processing and geometric mapping by team members at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., and Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., were required to stitch all the images together into this spectacular mosaic.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (52 kB) | Medium Image (274 kB) | Large (50.1 MB)
 
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (3-D)
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (3-D)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit looked up at the "Columbia Hills" from its location on the 265th martian day, or sol, of its mission (Sept. 30, 2004) and captured this 3-D view. This cropped mosaic image, presented here in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction, was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (25.5 kB) | Medium Image (210 kB) | Large (8 MB)
 
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (left eye)
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (left eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit looked up at the "Columbia Hills" from its location on the 265th martian day, or sol, of its mission (Sept. 30, 2004) and captured this view. This cropped mosaic image, presented here in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction, was taken by the rover's navigation camera. It is the left-eye half of a stereo pair.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (27 kB) | Medium Image (212 kB) | Large (4.1 MB)
 
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (right eye)
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (right eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit looked up at the "Columbia Hills" from its location on the 265th martian day, or sol, of its mission (Sept. 30, 2004) and captured this view. This cropped mosaic image, presented here in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction, was taken by the rover's navigation camera. It is the right-eye half of a stereo pair.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (26 kB) | Medium Image (207 kB) | Large (4 MB)
17-Sept-2004
 
 
Spirit's View from 'Engineering Flats'
Spirit's View from 'Engineering Flats'

This 360-degree view from a site dubbed "Engineering Flats" combines several frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 182nd martian day, or sol (July 7, 2004). Spirit had driven to this spot in the "Columbia Hills" for four sols of engineering work on its right front wheel and a recalibration of positioning accuracy for tools on its robotic arm. The wheel tracks just beyond the rover's shadow indicate where Spirit had spent the preceding three weeks examining rocks in and near "Hank's Hollow." The view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (302 kB) | Large (3.5 MB)
 
Spirit's View from 'Engineering Flats'(left eye)
Spirit's View from 'Engineering Flats'(left eye)

This 360-degree view from a site dubbed "Engineering Flats" combines several frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 182nd martian day, or sol (July 7, 2004). Spirit had driven to this spot in the "Columbia Hills" for four sols of engineering work on its right front wheel and a recalibration of positioning accuracy for tools on its robotic arm. The wheel tracks just beyond the rover's shadow indicate where Spirit had spent the preceding three weeks examining rocks in and near "Hank's Hollow." The view is the left-eye half of a stereo pair. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (308 kB) | Large (3.7 MB)
 
Spirit's View from 'Engineering Flats'(right eye)
Spirit's View from 'Engineering Flats'(right eye)

This 360-degree view from a site dubbed "Engineering Flats" combines several frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 182nd martian day, or sol (July 7, 2004). Spirit had driven to this spot in the "Columbia Hills" for four sols of engineering work on its right front wheel and a recalibration of positioning accuracy for tools on its robotic arm. The wheel tracks just beyond the rover's shadow indicate where Spirit had spent the preceding three weeks examining rocks in and near "Hank's Hollow." The view is the right-eye half of a stereo pair. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (295 kB) | Large (3.7 MB)
03-Sep-2004
 
 
Preparing for 'Lights Out' on Mars
Preparing for 'Lights Out' on Mars

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit takes a good look around at its surroundings high above Gusev Crater as mission planners prepare for solar conjunction on sol 244 (Sept. 9, 2004). On this day, and over the next 11 days, the rover will be out of reach as the Sun moves between Earth and Mars, blocking communications. Scientists are currently discussing potential light-duty assignments that may involve taking images of surrounding terrain, recording wind patterns in the dust, or completing scientific analysis of dust collected on the rover's magnets. Otherwise, Spirit will essentially be on vacation until sol 255 (Sept. 20, 2004). Dominating the left side of this image, to the east, is the high point of the "West Spur" region of the "Columbia Hills," where Spirit has been exploring rock outcrops since June. On the right side, northwest of the rover's present location, are Spirit's tracks leading up the slope. Dark areas show wheel tracks created when Spirit slipped a bit while negotiating the outcrops. Beyond that, sand dunes on the floor of Gusev Crater can be seen. About one-third of the way across the image from the right is the outcrop dubbed "Longhorn," above the rock dubbed "Clovis," where Spirit used its rock abrasion tool to grind the deepest hole to date on Mars. Just to the left of the middle of this image, a short distance beneath the summit, is a rock outcrop slanting to the left, or north. Spirit will spend the depth of the martian winter there with its solar panels oriented toward the Sun. Spirit's navigation camera took the images that make up this mosaic from a position labeled Site 86 on sols 228 to 230 (Aug. 23 to Aug. 25, 2004). The 360-degree view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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30-Aug-2004
 
 
Interesting Features in Spirit's Uphill View
Interesting Features in Spirit's Uphill View

Planetary scientists got excited when they saw this imagery coming in from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit because they could see hints of rock strata and other interesting geologic features ahead. In the middle of this image, from upper left to the lower right, lies a trough that resembles a small ravine. To the right of that and a little way up the hill, beyond a rock-strewn surface, sits a small rounded ridge. Fine horizontal streaks, just perceptible in this image, suggest possible layering in the bedrock. Above that are rock features that appear to drape across the slopes. Scientists are discussing whether to take the rover closer or select other interesting targets for further study. This view looks eastward from the "West Spur" of the "Columbia Hills," where Spirit has been conducting scientific investigations. It is a mosaic of several frames Spirit took with its panoramic camera on the rover's 229th martian day, or sol, (Aug. 24, 2004). The field of view is 48 degrees from left to right. The image is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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18-Aug-2004
 
 
Perched Above Gusev Crater
Perched Above Gusev Crater

This approximate true-color image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a rock outcrop dubbed "Longhorn," and behind it, the sweeping plains of Gusev Crater. On the horizon, the rim of Gusev Crater is clearly visible. The view is to the south of the rover's current position. The image consists of four frames taken by the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters of Spirit's panoramic camera on sol 210 (August 5, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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11-Aug-2004
 
 
Making Tracks on Mars
Making Tracks on Mars

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has been making tracks on Mars for seven months now, well beyond its original 90-day mission. The rover traveled more than 3 kilometers (2 miles) to reach the "Columbia Hills" pictured here. In this 360-degree view of the rolling martian terrain, its wheel tracks can be seen approaching from the northwest (right side of image).

Spirit's navigation camera took the images that make up this mosaic on sols 210 and 213 (Aug. 5 and Aug. 8, 2004). The rover is now conducting scientific studies of the local geology on the "Clovis" outcrop of the "West Spur" region of the "Columbia Hills." The view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometrical seam correction. Scientists plan for Spirit to take a color panoramic image from this location.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Making Tracks on Mars (3-D)
Making Tracks on Mars (3-D)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has been making tracks on Mars for seven months now, well beyond its original 90-day mission. The rover traveled more than 3 kilometers (2 miles) to reach the "Columbia Hills" pictured here. In this 3-D, 360-degree view of the rolling martian terrain, its wheel tracks can be seen approaching from the northwest (right side of image).

Spirit's navigation camera took the images that make up this mosaic on sols 210 and 213 (Aug. 5 and Aug. 8, 2004). The rover is now conducting scientific studies of the local geology on the "Clovis" outcrop of the "West Spur" region of the "Columbia Hills." The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction. Scientists plan for Spirit to take a color panoramic image from this location.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Making Tracks on Mars (left-eye)
Making Tracks on Mars (left-eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has been making tracks on Mars for seven months now, well beyond its original 90-day mission. The rover traveled more than 3 kilometers (2 miles) to reach the "Columbia Hills" pictured here. In this 360-degree view of the rolling martian terrain, its wheel tracks can be seen approaching from the northwest (right side of image).

Spirit's navigation camera took the images that make up this mosaic on sols 210 and 213 (Aug. 5 and Aug. 8, 2004). The rover is now conducting scientific studies of the local geology on the "Clovis" outcrop of the "West Spur" region of the "Columbia Hills." The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction. This is the left-eye view of a stereo pair. Scientists plan for Spirit to take a color panoramic image from this location.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Making Tracks on Mars (right-eye)
Making Tracks on Mars (right-eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has been making tracks on Mars for seven months now, well beyond its original 90-day mission. The rover traveled more than 3 kilometers (2 miles) to reach the "Columbia Hills" pictured here. In this 360-degree view of the rolling martian terrain, its wheel tracks can be seen approaching from the northwest (right side of image).

Spirit's navigation camera took the images that make up this mosaic on sols 210 and 213 (Aug. 5 and Aug. 8, 2004). The rover is now conducting scientific studies of the local geology on the "Clovis" outcrop of the "West Spur" region of the "Columbia Hills." The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction. This is the right-eye view of a stereo pair. Scientists plan for Spirit to take a color panoramic image from this location.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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An Outcrop with a View
An Outcrop with a View

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit created this 360-degree view of the rolling martian terrain at "Columbia Hills" on sol 204 (July 30, 2004), after traveling more than 3 kilometers (2 miles) across the plains of the 165-kilometer-wide (103-mile-wide) Gusev Crater. This mosaic was created from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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An Outcrop with a View (3-D)
An Outcrop with a View (3-D)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit created this 3-D, 360-degree view of the rolling martian terrain at "Columbia Hills" on sol 204 (July 30, 2004), after traveling more than 3 kilometers (2 miles) across the plains of the 165-kilometer-wide (103-mile-wide) Gusev Crater. This mosaic was created from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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An Outcrop with a View (left-eye)
An Outcrop with a View (left-eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit created this 360-degree view of the rolling martian terrain at "Columbia Hills" on sol 204 (July 30, 2004), after traveling more than 3 kilometers (2 miles) across the plains of the 165-kilometer-wide (103-mile-wide) Gusev Crater. This mosaic was created from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.This is the left-eye view of a stereo pair.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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An Outcrop with a View (right-eye)
An Outcrop with a View (right-eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit created this 360-degree view of the rolling martian terrain at "Columbia Hills" on sol 204 (July 30, 2004), after traveling more than 3 kilometers (2 miles) across the plains of the 165-kilometer-wide (103-mile-wide) Gusev Crater. This mosaic was created from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction. This is the right-eye view of a stereo pair.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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22-Jul-2004
 
 
Spirit's View on Sol 189
Hilly Surroundings (cylindrical)

This 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was taken on the rover's 189th sol on Mars (July 15, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as Site 72, which is at the base of the "West Spur" portion of the "Columbia Hills." The view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometrical seam correction.

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Spirit's View on Sol 189 (3-D)
Hilly Surroundings (3-D)

This 360-degree stereo anaglyph of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was taken on the rover's 189th sol on Mars (July 15, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as Site 72, which is at the base of the "West Spur" portion of the "Columbia Hills." The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 189 (Left-Eye)
Hilly Surroundings (left-eye)

This is the left-eye view of a stereo pair showing the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the rover's 189th sol on Mars (July 15th, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as Site 72, which is at the base of the "West Spur" portion of the "Columbia Hills." The 360-degree view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 189 (Right-Eye)
Hilly Surroundings (right-eye)

This is the right-eye view of a stereo pair showing the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the rover's 189th sol on Mars (July 15, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as Site 72, which is at the base of the "West Spur" portion of the "Columbia Hills." The 360-degree view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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16-Jul-2004
 
 
'Santa Anita' Panorama
'Santa Anita' Panorama

This color mosaic taken on May 21, 25 and 26, 2004, by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was acquired from a position roughly three-fourths the way between "Bonneville Crater" and the base of the "Columbia Hills." The area is within a low thermal inertia unit (an area that heats up and cools off quickly) identified from orbit by the Mars Odyssey thermal emission imaging system instrument. The rover was roughly 600 meters (1,968 feet) from the base of the hills.

This mosaic, referred to as the "Santa Anita Panorama," is comprised of 64 pointings, acquired with six of the panoramic camera's color filters, including one designed specifically to allow comparisons between orbital and surface brightness data. A total of 384 images were acquired as part of this panorama. The mosaic is an approximate true-color rendering constructed from images using the camera's 750-, 530- and and 480-nanometer filters, and is presented at the full resolution of the camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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A Peak of Interest
A Peak of Interest

This approximate true-color rendering of an image taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a view of the peak-like outcrop atop "West Spur." Spirit will attempt to drive up the north slope of the "Columbia Hills" to reach similar rock outcrops and investigate the composition of the hills. The image was taken on sol 178 (July 4, 2004) using the camera's 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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07-Jul-2004
 
 
Gusev on the Horizon
Gusev on the Horizon

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the images that make up this mosaic with its panoramic camera on sol 161 (June 16, 2004). The view is looking southward and shows the etched terrain that makes up this landscape. The wall of Gusev Crater appears light gray and can be seen rising up against the horizon. This image was taken with the panoramic camera's blue (750-nanometer) filter. Its contrast was stretched.

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15-Jun-2004
 
 
'Pot of Gold' and 'Rotten Rocks'
'Pot of Gold' and 'Rotten Rocks'

This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed "Pot of Gold" (upper left), located near the base of the "Columbia Hills" in Gusev Crater. Scientists are intrigued by this unusual-looking, nodule-covered rock and plan to investigate its detailed chemistry in coming sols. This picture was taken on sol 159 (June 14, 2004).

To the right is a set of rocks referred to as "Rotten Rocks" for their resemblance to rotting loaves of bread. The insides of these rocks appear to have been eroded, while their outer rinds remain more intact. These outer rinds are reminiscent of those found on rocks at Meridiani Planum's "Eagle Crater." This image was captured on sol 158 (June 13, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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'Columbia Hills' at Last!
'Columbia Hills' at Last!

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the images that make up this 360-degree panorama with its navigation camera on sol 156 (June 11, 2004). The image highlights Spirit's arrival at the base of the "Columbia Hills." Since landing at Gusev Crater, Spirit has put more than 3.4 kilometers (2.1 miles) on its odometer. Much of this can be attributed to the long drives the rover undertook to reach these interesting landforms.

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The Columbia Hills at Last!
The Columbia Hills at Last!

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the images that make up this 360-degree mosaic anaglyph with its navigation camera on sol 156 (June 11, 2004). The image, projected at a cylindrical perspective, highlights Spirit's arrival at the base of the Columbia Hills. Since landing at Gusev crater, Spirit has put more than 3.4 kilometers (2.1 miles) on its odometer. Much of this can be attributed to the long drives the rover had to undertake to reach these interesting landforms.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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The Columbia Hills at Last!
The Columbia Hills at Last!

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this left eye of a pair of stereo images, projected at a cylindrical perspective, with its navigation camera on sol 156 (June 11, 2004). The image highlights Spirit's arrival at the base of the Columbia Hills. Since landing at Gusev crater, Spirit has put more than 3.4 kilometers (2.1 miles) on its odometer. Much of this can be attributed to the long drives the rover had to undertake to reach these interesting landforms.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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The Columbia Hills at Last!
The Columbia Hills at Last!

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this right eye of a pair of stereo images, projected at a cylindrical perspective, with its navigation camera on sol 156 (June 11, 2004). The image highlights Spirit's arrival at the base of the Columbia Hills. Since landing at Gusev crater, Spirit has put more than 3.4 kilometers (2.1 miles) on its odometer. Much of this can be attributed to the long drives the rover had to undertake to reach these interesting landforms.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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10-Jun-2004
 
 
Spiritís Shadow, Sol 153
Spiritís Shadow, Sol 153

This cylindrical-projection mosaic was created from navigation camera images acquired by NASAís Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during Spirit's sol 153, on June 8, 2004. Spirit is pointing toward the base of the "Columbia Hills."

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Spiritís Shadow, Sol 153 (3-D)
Spiritís Shadow, Sol 153 (3-D)

This cylindrical-perspective stereo mosaic was created from navigation camera images acquired by NASAís Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during Spirit's sol 153, on June 8, 2004. Spirit is pointing toward the base of the "Columbia Hills."

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Spiritís Shadow, Sol 153 (left eye)
Spiritís Shadow, Sol 153 (left eye)

This is the left-eye half of a stereo pair of mosaics created from navigation camera images acquired by NASAís Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during Spirit's sol 153, on June 8, 2004. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection. Spirit is pointing toward the base of the "Columbia Hills."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spiritís Shadow, Sol 153 (right eye)
Spiritís Shadow, Sol 153 (right eye)

This is the right-eye half of a stereo pair of mosaics created from navigation camera images acquired by NASAís Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during Spirit's sol 153, on June 8, 2004. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection. Spirit is pointing toward the base of the "Columbia Hills."

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Spirit Tracks on Mars, Sol 151
Spirit Tracks on Mars, Sol 151

This cylindrical projection mosaic was created from navigation camera images acquired by NASAís Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during Spirit's 151st martian day, or sol, on June 5, 2004. The rover sits at site 63, still more than 100 meters (328 feet) from the base of the "Columbia Hills." As suggested by the rover tracks fading off in the distance, Spirit made great progress on this sol, roving 73 meters (240 feet) to get to this point.

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Spirit Tracks on Mars, Sol 151 (3-D)
Spirit Tracks on Mars, Sol 151 (3-D)

This stereo view of a full 360-degree panorama in Mars' Gusev Crater region was assembled from frames taken by the navigation camera on NASAís Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during Spirit's 151st martian day, or sol, on June 5, 2004. The view is presented in a cylidrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The rover sits at site 63, still more than 100 meters (328 feet) from the base of the "Columbia Hills." As suggested by the rover tracks fading off in the distance, Spirit made great progress on this sol, roving 73 meters (240 feet) to get to this point.

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Spirit Tracks on Mars, Sol 151 (Left Eye)
Spirit Tracks on Mars, Sol 151 (Left Eye)

This is the left-eye half of a stereo pair of 360-degree views assembled from frames taken by the navigation camera on NASAís Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during Spirit's 151st martian day, or sol, on June 5, 2004. The view is presented in a cylidrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The rover sits at site 63, still more than 100 meters (328 feet) from the base of the "Columbia Hills." As suggested by the rover tracks fading off in the distance, Spirit made great progress on this sol, roving 73 meters (240 feet) to get to this point.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit Tracks on Mars, Sol 151 (Right Eye)
Spirit Tracks on Mars, Sol 151 (Right Eye)

This is the right-eye half of a stereo pair of 360-degree views assembled from frames taken by the navigation camera on NASAís Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during Spirit's 151st martian day, or sol, on June 5, 2004. The view is presented in a cylidrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The rover sits at site 63, still more than 100 meters (328 feet) from the base of the "Columbia Hills." As suggested by the rover tracks fading off in the distance, Spirit made great progress on this sol, roving 73 meters (240 feet) to get to this point.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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08-Jun-2004
 
 
Salty Trench
Salty Trench

This image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a trench dug by the rover on its way toward the "Columbia Hills." Measurements taken of the soil contained in the trench by Spirit's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer showed the presence of sulfur and magnesium. Concentrations of those two elements varied in parallel at different locations in the trench, suggesting that they may be paired as a magnesium-sulfate salt. One possible explanation for these findings is that water percolated through underground material and dissolved out minerals, then as the water evaporated near the surface, it left concentrated salts behind.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Approaching the Hills
Approaching the Hills

This approximate true-color rendering of the central part of the "Columbia Hills" was made using images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit panoramic camera. Scientists plan to use the science instruments on the rover to analyze the composition of rock and soil at the hills," Spirit's planned destination. The images in this mosaic, acquired on sol 149 (June 3, 2004), were taken with the camera's 600, 530, and 480 nanometer filters from three rover positions approximately 300 meters (984 feet) away from the base of the hills.

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03-Jun-2004
 
 
Spirit's View on Sol 142
Spirit's View on Sol 142

This 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the 142nd martian day of the rover's mission inside Gusev Crater, on May 27, 2004, was assembled from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The rover's position is Site A55. The view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometrical seam correction.

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Spirit's View on Sol 142 (3-D)
Spirit's View on Sol 142 (3-D)

This 360-degree stereo anaglyph of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the 142nd martian day of the rover's mission inside Gusev Crater, on May 27, 2004, was assembled from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The rover's position is Site A55. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

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Spirit's View on Sol 142 (Left Eye)

This is the left-eye view of a stereo pair showing a 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the 142nd martian day of the rover's mission inside Gusev Crater, on May 27, 2004. It was assembled from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The rover's position is Site A55. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

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Spirit's View on Sol 142 (Right Eye)
Spirit's View on Sol 142 (Right Eye)

This is the right-eye view of a stereo pair showing a 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the 142nd martian day of the rover's mission inside Gusev Crater, on May 27, 2004. It was assembled from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The rover's position is Site A55. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 147
Spirit's View on Sol 147

This 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the 147th martian day of the rover's mission inside Gusev Crater, on June 1, 2004, was assembled from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The rover's position is Site A60. The view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometrical seam correction.

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Spirit's View on Sol 147 (3-D)
Spirit's View on Sol 147 (3-D)

This 360-degree stereo anaglyph of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the 147th martian day of the rover's mission inside Gusev Crater, on June 1, 2004, was assembled from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The rover's position is Site A60. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 147 (Left Eye)
Spirit's View on Sol 147 (Left Eye)

This is the left-eye view of a stereo pair showing a 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the 147th martian day of the rover's mission inside Gusev Crater, on June 1, 2004. It was assembled from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The rover's position is Site A60. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 147 (Right Eye)
Spirit's View on Sol 147 (Right Eye)

This is the right-eye view of a stereo pair showing a 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the 147th martian day of the rover's mission inside Gusev Crater, on June 1, 2004. It was assembled from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The rover's position is Site A60. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 148
Spirit's View on Sol 148

This 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the 148th martian day of the rover's mission inside Gusev Crater, on June 2, 2004, was assembled from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The rover's position is Site A61. The view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 148 (3-D)
Spirit's View on Sol 148 (3-D)

This 360-degree stereo anaglyph of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the 148th martian day of the rover's mission inside Gusev Crater, on June 2, 2004, was assembled from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The rover's position is Site A61. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 148 (Left Eye)
Spirit's View on Sol 148 (Left Eye)

This is the left-eye view of a stereo pair showing a 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the 148th martian day of the rover's mission inside Gusev Crater, on June 2, 2004. It was assembled from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The rover's position is Site A61. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 148 (Right Eye)
Spirit's View on Sol 148 (Right Eye)

This is the right-eye view of a stereo pair showing a 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the 148th martian day of the rover's mission inside Gusev Crater, on June 2, 2004. It was assembled from images taken by Spirit's navigation camera. The rover's position is Site A61. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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02-Jun-2004
 
 
Lahontan Crater Looms
Lahontan Crater Looms

This cylindrical-projection 120-degree image mosaic was created from three navigation camera images that NASAís Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 120 (May 5, 2004). The image highlights a crater approximately 70 meters (230 feet) in diameter that scientists have informally named "Lahontan." This image also reveals a wind-ripple feature in the foreground and a distant look at the Columbia Hills on the Horizon, Spirit's planned final destination.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Lahontan Crater Looms
Lahontan Crater Looms

This cylindrical-projection 120-degree image mosaic was created from three navigation camera images that NASAís Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 120 (May 5, 2004). The image highlights a crater approximately 70 meters (230 feet) in diameter that scientists have informally named "Lahontan." This image also reveals a wind-ripple feature in the foreground and a distant look at the Columbia Hills on the Horizon, Spirit's planned final destination.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Image for June 02, 2004

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Image for June 02, 2004

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18-May-2004
 
 
'Bonneville Crater' Panorama
'Bonneville Crater' Panorama

This 360-degree view from a position beside the crater informally named "Bonneville" was assembled from frames taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. Half of this panorama was first released on March 15, 2004. The entire mosaic, recently completed, reveals not only the crater rim and interior, but Spirit's tracks and a glimpse at part of the rover. The images were acquired on sol 68, March 12, 2004, just one day after Spirit reached this location. The image is a false-color composite made from frames taken with the camera's L2 (750 nanometer), L5 (530 nanometer) and L6 (480 nanometer) filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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17-May-2004
 
 
Temperature Map, 'Bonneville Crater'
Temperature Map, "Bonneville Crater"

Rates of change in surface temperatures during a martian day indicate differences in particle size in and near "Bonneville Crater." Temperature information from the miniature thermal emission spectrometer on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is overlaid onto a view of the site from Spirit's panoramic camera. This sequence of five frames begins at the top with data from 10:15 a.m. local solar time at Spirit's location inside Mars' Gusev Crater. The times of the subsequent frames are 11:49 a.m., 1:35 p.m., 2:35 p.m. and 4:39 p.m.

In this color-coded map, quicker reddening during the day suggests sand or dust. (Red is about 270 Kelvin or 27 degrees Fahrenheit.) An example of this is in the shallow depression in the right foreground. Areas that stay blue longer into the day have larger rocks. (Blue indicates about 230 Kelvin or minus 45 Degrees F.) An example is the rock in the left foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
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Temperature Map, 'Bonneville Crater' (10:15 a.m.)
Temperature Map, "Bonneville Crater" (10:15 a.m.)

Rates of change in surface temperatures during a martian day indicate differences in particle size in and near "Bonneville Crater." This image is the first in a series of five with color-coded temperature information from different times of day. This one is from 10:15 a.m. local solar time at the site where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is exploring Mars. Temperature information from Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer is overlaid onto a view of the site from Spirit's panoramic camera.

In this color-coded map, quicker reddening during the day suggests sand or dust. (Red is about 270 Kelvin or 27 degrees Fahrenheit.) An example of this is in the shallow depression in the right foreground. Areas that stay blue longer into the day have larger rocks. (Blue indicates about 230 Kelvin or minus 45 Degrees F.) An example is the rock in the left foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
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Temperature Map, 'Bonneville Crater' (11:49 a.m.)
Temperature Map, "Bonneville Crater" (11:49 a.m.)

Rates of change in surface temperatures during a martian day indicate differences in particle size in and near "Bonneville Crater." This image is the second in a series of five with color-coded temperature information from different times of day. This one is from 11:49 a.m. local solar time at the site where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is exploring Mars. Temperature information from Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer is overlaid onto a view of the site from Spirit's panoramic camera.

In this color-coded map, quicker reddening during the day suggests sand or dust. (Red is about 270 Kelvin or 27 degrees Fahrenheit.) An example of this is in the shallow depression in the right foreground. Areas that stay blue longer into the day have larger rocks. (Blue indicates about 230 Kelvin or minus 45 Degrees F.) An example is the rock in the left foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
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Temperature Map, 'Bonneville Crater' (1:35 p.m.)
Temperature Map, "Bonneville Crater" (1:35 p.m.)

Rates of change in surface temperatures during a martian day indicate differences in particle size in and near "Bonneville Crater." This image is the third in a series of five with color-coded temperature information from different times of day. This one is from 1:35 p.m. local solar time at the site where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is exploring Mars. Temperature information from Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer is overlaid onto a view of the site from Spirit's panoramic camera.

In this color-coded map, quicker reddening during the day suggests sand or dust. (Red is about 270 Kelvin or 27 degrees Fahrenheit.) An example of this is in the shallow depression in the right foreground. Areas that stay blue longer into the day have larger rocks. (Blue indicates about 230 Kelvin or minus 45 Degrees F.) An example is the rock in the left foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
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Temperature Map, 'Bonneville Crater' (2:35 p.m.)
Temperature Map, "Bonneville Crater" (2:35 p.m.)

Rates of change in surface temperatures during a martian day indicate differences in particle size in and near "Bonneville Crater." This image is the fourth in a series of five with color-coded temperature information from different times of day. This one is from 2:35 p.m. local solar time at the site where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is exploring Mars. Temperature information from Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer is overlaid onto a view of the site from Spirit's panoramic camera.

In this color-coded map, quicker reddening during the day suggests sand or dust. (Red is about 270 Kelvin or 27 degrees Fahrenheit.) An example of this is in the shallow depression in the right foreground. Areas that stay blue longer into the day have larger rocks. (Blue indicates about 230 Kelvin or minus 45 Degrees F.) An example is the rock in the left foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
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Temperature Map, 'Bonneville Crater' (4:39 p.m.)
Temperature Map, "Bonneville Crater" (4:39 p.m.)

Rates of change in surface temperatures during a martian day indicate differences in particle size in and near "Bonneville Crater." This image is the fifth in a series of five with color-coded temperature information from different times of day. This one is from 4:39 p.m. local solar time at the site where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is exploring Mars. Temperature information from Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer is overlaid onto a view of the site from Spirit's panoramic camera.

In this color-coded map, quicker reddening during the day suggests sand or dust. (Red is about 270 Kelvin or 27 degrees Fahrenheit.) An example of this is in the shallow depression in the right foreground. Areas that stay blue longer into the day have larger rocks. (Blue indicates about 230 Kelvin or minus 45 Degrees F.) An example is the rock in the left foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
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14-May-2004
 
 
The Road Less Traveled
The Road Less Traveled

This cylindrical-projection view was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 127 (May 12, 2004). Spirit is sitting at site 48. The tracks show the path the rover has traveled so far on its way to the base of the "Columbia Hills." In this image, the hills can be seen silhouetted against the horizon on the far left side. Spirit will reach the base of the hills by sol 160.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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The Road Less Traveled (3-D)
The Road Less Traveled (3-D)

This three-dimensional view in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 127 (May 12, 2004). Spirit is sitting at site 48. The tracks show the path the rover has traveled so far on its way to the base of the "Columbia Hills." In this image, the hills can be seen silhouetted against the horizon on the far left side. Spirit will reach the base of the hills by sol 160.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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The Road Less Traveled (left eye)
The Road Less Traveled (left eye)

This left eye of a stereo pair of views in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 127 (May 12, 2004). Spirit is sitting at site 48. The tracks show the path the rover has traveled so far on its way to the base of the "Columbia Hills." In this image, the hills can be seen silhouetted against the horizon on the far left side. Spirit will reach the base of the hills by sol 160.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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The Road Less Traveled (right eye)
The Road Less Traveled (right eye)

This right eye of a stereo pair of views in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 127 (May 12, 2004). Spirit is sitting at site 48. The tracks show the path the rover has traveled so far on its way to the base of the "Columbia Hills." In this image, the hills can be seen silhouetted against the horizon on the far left side. Spirit will reach the base of the hills by sol 160.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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11-May-2004
 
 
Spirit Keeps on Trekking
Spirit Keeps on Trekking

This cylindrical-projection mosaic was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 121 (May 6, 2004). Continuing its trek toward the "Columbia Hills," Spirit drove 96.8 meters (318 feet) - half of which was performed in auto-navigation mode - and broke its record for the longest distance traveled in one sol. That drive brought the mission total to 1,669 meters (1.04 miles), flipping the rover's odometer over the one-mile mark.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit Keeps on Trekking (3-D)
Spirit Keeps on Trekking (3-D)

This three-dimensional view in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 121 (May 6, 2004). Continuing its trek toward the "Columbia Hills," Spirit drove 96.8 meters (318 feet) - half of which was performed in auto-navigation mode - and broke its record for the longest distance traveled in one sol. That drive brought the mission total to 1,669 meters (1.04 miles), flipping the rover's odometer over the one-mile mark.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit Keeps on Trekking (left eye)
Spirit Keeps on Trekking (left eye)

This left eye of a stereo pair of views in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 121 (May 6, 2004). Continuing its trek toward the "Columbia Hills," Spirit drove 96.8 meters (318 feet) - half of which was performed in auto-navigation mode - and broke its record for the longest distance traveled in one sol. That drive brought the mission total to 1,669 meters (1.04 miles), flipping the rover's odometer over the one-mile mark.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit Keeps on Trekking (right eye)
Spirit Keeps on Trekking (right eye)

This right eye of a stereo pair of views in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 121 (May 6, 2004). Continuing its trek toward the "Columbia Hills," Spirit drove 96.8 meters (318 feet) - half of which was performed in auto-navigation mode - and broke its record for the longest distance traveled in one sol. That drive brought the mission total to 1,669 meters (1.04 miles), flipping the rover's odometer over the one-mile mark.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit Heads Toward History
Spirit Heads Toward History

This cylindrical-projection view was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 122 (May 7,2004). Spirit is sitting at site 43. The rover is on its way to the "Columbia Hills," which can be seen on the horizon. Spirit will spend the next 37 sols or more journeying to the base of these hills with the goal of learning more about Gusev Crater's past.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit Heads Toward History (3-D)
Spirit Heads Toward History (3-D)

This three-dimensional view in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 122 (May 7,2004). Spirit is sitting at site 43. The rover is on its way to the "Columbia Hills," which can be seen on the horizon. Spirit will spend the next 37 sols or more journeying to the base of these hills with the goal of learning more about Gusev Crater's past.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit Heads Toward History (left eye)
Spirit Heads Toward History (left eye)

This left eye of a stereo pair of views in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 122 (May 7,2004). Spirit is sitting at site 43. The rover is on its way to the "Columbia Hills," which can be seen on the horizon. Spirit will spend the next 37 sols or more journeying to the base of these hills with the goal of learning more about Gusev Crater's past.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit Heads Toward History (right eye)
Spirit Heads Toward History (right eye)

This right eye of a stereo pair of views in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 122 (May 7,2004). Spirit is sitting at site 43. The rover is on its way to the "Columbia Hills," which can be seen on the horizon. Spirit will spend the next 37 sols or more journeying to the base of these hills with the goal of learning more about Gusev Crater's past.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 123 (cylindrical)
Spirit's View on Sol 123 (cylindrical)

This cylindrical-projection view was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 123 (May 8, 2004). Spirit is sitting at site 44. The rover is on the way to the "Columbia Hills," which can be seen on the horizon. To this point, Spirit has driven a total of 1,830 meters (1.14 miles). The hills are less than 1.6 kilometers (1 mile) away, and the rover might reach them by mid-June.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 123 (3-D)
Spirit's View on Sol 123 (3-D)

This three-dimensional view in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 123 (May 8, 2004). Spirit is sitting at site 44. The rover is on the way to the "Columbia Hills," which can be seen on the horizon. To this point, Spirit has driven a total of 1,830 meters (1.14 miles). The hills are less than 1.6 kilometers (1 mile) away, and the rover might reach them by mid-June.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 123 (left eye)
Spirit's View on Sol 123 (left eye)

This left eye of a stereo pair of views in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 123 (May 8, 2004). Spirit is sitting at site 44. The rover is on the way to the "Columbia Hills," which can be seen on the horizon. To this point, Spirit has driven a total of 1,830 meters (1.14 miles). The hills are less than 1.6 kilometers (1 mile) away, and the rover might reach them by mid-June.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 123 (right eye)
Spirit's View on Sol 123 (right eye)

This right eye of a stereo pair of views in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 123 (May 8, 2004). Spirit is sitting at site 44. The rover is on the way to the "Columbia Hills," which can be seen on the horizon. To this point, Spirit has driven a total of 1,830 meters (1.14 miles). The hills are less than 1.6 kilometers (1 mile) away, and the rover might reach them by mid-June.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spiritís View on Sol 124
Spiritís View on Sol 124

This cylindrical-projection view was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 124 (May 9, 2004). It reveals Spiritís view as it gets closer to the ďColumbia Hills.Ē

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spiritís View on Sol 124 (3-D)
Spiritís View on Sol 124 (3-D)

This three-dimensional view in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 124 (May 9, 2004). It reveals Spiritís view as it gets closer to the ďColumbia Hills.Ē

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spiritís View on Sol 124 (left eye)
Spiritís View on Sol 124 (left eye)

This left eye of a stereo pair of views in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 124 (May 9, 2004). It reveals Spiritís view as it gets closer to the ďColumbia Hills.Ē

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spiritís View on Sol 124 (right eye)
Spiritís View on Sol 124 (right eye)

This right eye of a stereo pair of views in a cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 124 (May 9, 2004). It reveals Spiritís view as it gets closer to the ďColumbia Hills.Ē

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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10-May-2004
 
 
A Closer Look at the 'Columbia Hills'
A Closer Look at the 'Columbia Hills'

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image mosaic of the "Columbia Hills" at 4:15 p.m. local solar time on sol 122 (May 7, 2004). Spirit will spend the next 37 sols or more approaching the base of the highest peak seen in this image. Rover controllers and scientists are sending Spirit to this faraway location because the hills there are likely an older unit of rock and may provide insight into the past environment at Gusev Crater.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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28-Apr-2004
 
 
Spirit Spies Its Shadow
Spirit Spies Its Shadow

This 360-degree panorama taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit highlights the bumpy terrain surrounding the rover. Spirit's shadow can be seen in a small hollow lying between the rover and its intended target, the eastern-lying "Columbia Hills." Spirit's longest drive so far covered about 88.5 meters (about 290 feet) and took place on sol 113. This image was taken on sol 112 (April 26, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Hills on the Horizon

This image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rover's ultimate destination -- the "Columbia Hills." It was acquired on sol 89 with the camera's green filter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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26-Apr-2004
 
 
Spirit's View on Sol 107
Spirit's View on Sol 107

This cylindrical-projection mosaic was assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 107 (April 21, 2004) at a region dubbed "site 32." Spirit is sitting east of "Missoula Crater," no longer in the crater's ejecta field, but on outer plains. Since landing, Spirit has traveled almost exclusively over ejecta fields. This new landscape looks different with fewer angular rocks and more rounded, vesicle-filled rocks. Spirit will continue another 1,900 meters (1.18 miles) along this terrain before reaching the western base of the "Columbia Hills."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 107 in 3-D
Spirit's View on Sol 107 in 3-D

This three-dimensional, cylindrical-perspective projection was assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 107 (April 21, 2004) at a region dubbed "site 32." Spirit is sitting east of "Missoula Crater," no longer in the crater's ejecta field, but on outer plains. Since landing, Spirit has traveled almost exclusively over ejecta fields. This new landscape looks different with fewer angular rocks and more rounded, vesicle-filled rocks. Spirit will continue another 1,900 meters (1.18 miles) along this terrain before reaching the western base of the "Columbia Hills."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 107 (left eye)

This cylindrical-perspective projection was assembled from images taken by the left navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 107 (April 21, 2004) at a region dubbed "site 32." Spirit is sitting east of "Missoula Crater," no longer in the crater's ejecta field, but on outer plains. Since landing, Spirit has traveled almost exclusively over ejecta fields. This new landscape looks different with fewer angular rocks and more rounded, vesicle-filled rocks. Spirit will continue another 1,900 meters (1.18 miles) along this terrain before reaching the western base of the "Columbia Hills."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 107 (right eye)
Spirit's View on Sol 107 (right eye)

This cylindrical-perspective projection was assembled from images taken by the right navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 107 (April 21, 2004) at a region dubbed "site 32." Spirit is sitting east of "Missoula Crater," no longer in the crater's ejecta field, but on outer plains. Since landing, Spirit has traveled almost exclusively over ejecta fields. This new landscape looks different with fewer angular rocks and more rounded, vesicle-filled rocks. Spirit will continue another 1,900 meters (1.18 miles) along this terrain before reaching the western base of the "Columbia Hills."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 110
Spirit's View on Sol 110

This cylindrical-projection mosaic was assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 110 (April 24, 2004) at a region dubbed "site 35." Spirit is sitting approximately 33 meters (100 feet) away from the northeast rim of "Missoula" crater.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 110 in 3-D
Spirit's View on Sol 110 in 3-D

This three-dimensional, cylindrical-perspective projection was assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 110 (April 24, 2004) at a region dubbed "site 35." Spirit is sitting approximately 33 meters (100 feet) away from the northeast rim of "Missoula" crater.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 110 (left eye)
Spirit's View on Sol 110 (left eye)

This cylindrical-perspective projection was assembled from images taken by the left navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 110 (April 24, 2004) at a region dubbed "site 35." Spirit is sitting approximately 33 meters (100 feet) away from the northeast rim of "Missoula" crater.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 110 (right eye)
Spirit's View on Sol 110 (right eye)

This cylindrical-perspective projection was assembled from images taken by the right navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 110 (April 24, 2004) at a region dubbed "site 35." Spirit is sitting approximately 33 meters (100 feet) away from the northeast rim of "Missoula" crater.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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20-Apr-2004
 
 
Spirit's View on Sol 93 (cylindrical)
Spirit's View on Sol 93 (cylindrical)

This cylindrical-projection mosaic was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 93 (April 7, 2004). It reveals the martian view from Spirit's position during the four-sol flight software update that began on sol 94.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 93 (3-D)

This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 93 (April 7, 2004). It reveals the martian view from Spirit's position during the four-sol flight software update that began on sol 94.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Browse Image | Medium Image (260 kB) | Large (3.7 MB)
 

Browse Image | Medium Image (255 kB) | Large (3.6 MB)
 
Spirit's View on Sol 100 (cylindrical)
Spirit's View on Sol 100 (cylindrical)

This cylindrical-projection mosaic was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 100 (April 14, 2004). It reveals Spirit's view after a century of sols on the martian surface.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 100 (3-D)

This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 100 (April 14, 2004). It reveals Spirit's view after a century of sols on the martian surface.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Browse Image | Medium Image (243 kB) | Large (8.5 MB)
 
Spirit's View on Sol 101 (cylindrical)
Spirit's View on Sol 101 (cylindrical)

This cylindrical-projection mosaic was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 101 (April 15, 2004). It reveals Spirit's view just before a stopping-point dubbed "Missoula Crater." The rover is on its way to the "Columbia Hills."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's View on Sol 101 (3-D)
Spirit's View on Sol 101 (3-D)

This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired on sol 101 (April 15, 2004). It reveals Spirit's view just before a stopping-point dubbed "Missoula Crater." The rover is on its way to the "Columbia Hills."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Browse Image | Medium Image (223 kB) | Large (3.5 MB)
 

Browse Image | Medium Image (217 kB) | Large (3.4 MB)
08-Apr-2004
 
 
Heading for the Hills
Heading for the Hills

This enhanced false-color mosaic image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit panoramic camera shows the view acquired after the rover drove approximately 50.2 meters (165 feet) on the martian afternoon of sol 89 (April 3, 2004). The view shows the direction of the rover's future drive destination. In the distance are the eastern-lying "Columbia Hills." This image was assembled from images in the panoramic camera's near-infrared (750 nanometer), green (530 nanometer), and violet (432 nanometer) filters. The colors have been exaggerated to enhance the differences between cleaner and dustier rocks, and lighter and darker soils.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Heading for the Hills
Heading for the Hills

This enhanced false-color mosaic image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit panoramic camera shows the view acquired after the rover drove approximately 50.2 meters (165 feet) on the martian afternoon of sol 89 (April 3, 2004). The view shows the direction of the rover's future drive destination. In the distance are the eastern-lying "Columbia Hills." This image was assembled from images in the panoramic camera's near-infrared (750 nanometer), green (530 nanometer), and violet (432 nanometer) filters. The colors have been exaggerated to enhance the differences between cleaner and dustier rocks, and lighter and darker soils.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (464 kB) | Large (3.7 MB)
 
Heading for the Hills
Heading for the Hills

This mosaic image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit panoramic camera shows the view acquired after the rover drove 50.2 meters (165 feet) on the martian afternoon of sol 89 (April 3, 2004). The view shows the direction of the rover's future drive destination. In the distance are the eastern-lying "Columbia Hills." This image was assembled from images in the panoramic camera's green (530 nanometer) filter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (306 kB) | Large (1.8 MB)
02-Apr-2004
 
 
Saying Goodbye to 'Bonneville' Crater

NASAís Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image on sol 86 (March 31, 2004) before driving 36 meters (118 feet) on sol 87 toward its future destination, the Columbia Hills. This is probably the last panoramic camera image that Spirit will take from the high rim of "Bonneville" crater, and provides an excellent view of the ejecta-covered path the rover has journeyed thus far. The lander can be seen toward the upper right of the frame and is approximately 321 meters (1060 feet) away from Spiritís current location. The large hill on the horizon is Grissom Hill. The Colombia Hills, located to the left, are not visible in this image.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Saying Goodbye to 'Bonneville' Crater (with labels)

NASAís Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image on sol 86 (March 31, 2004) before driving 36 meters (118 feet) on sol 87 toward its future destination, the Columbia Hills. This is probably the last panoramic camera image that Spirit will take from the high rim of "Bonneville" crater, and provides an excellent view of the ejecta-covered path the rover has journeyed thus far. The lander can be seen toward the upper right of the frame and is approximately 321 meters (1060 feet) away from Spiritís current location. The large hill on the horizon is Grissom Hill. The Colombia Hills, located to the left, are not visible in this image.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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29-Mar-2004
 
 
What Lies Ahead (3-D)
What Lies Ahead (3-D)

This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed "Bonneville." The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed "Mazatzal" and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as "Site 22, Position 32." This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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What Lies Ahead
What Lies Ahead

This cylindrical mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed "Bonneville." The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed "Mazatzal" and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as "Site 22, Position 32." This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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What Lies Ahead (left-eye)
What Lies Ahead (left-eye)

This is the left-eye version of the 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic showing the view south of the martian crater dubbed "Bonneville." The image was taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed "Mazatzal" and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as "Site 22, Position 32." This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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What Lies Ahead (right-eye)
What Lies Ahead (right-eye)

This is the right-eye version of the 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic showing the view south of the martian crater dubbed "Bonneville." The image was taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed "Mazatzal" and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as "Site 22, Position 32." This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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24-Mar-2004
 
 
Heatshield on the Horizon
Heatshield on the Horizon

The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired this panoramic camera image mosaic on the 68th martian day, or sol, of its mission (March 12, 2004). The reflective speck about 200 meters (650 feet) away, on the far crater rim, was immediately a point of interest for scientists and engineers alike. They soon were able to identify it as Spirit's protective heatshield.

While the debris is too far away to make out clearly, orbital imagery of the area acquired before and after Spirit landed supports scientists' and engineers' conclusion. Prior to Spirit's landing, the surface at this location appeared undisturbed in orbital images, while post-landing images revealed a large gouge where the heatshield now rests.

The smaller image in the box at the lower left corner provides a closer look at the heatshield, and was taken at a lower compression by the panoramic camera on sol 69 (March 13, 2004). Lower compression results in higher quality images. While both the full panorama and close-up are depicted in approximate true color, their colors vary slightly because different filters were used to acquire them. The close-up image was taken with the 600, 530 and 480 nanometer filters. The large mosaic was taken with the 750, 530 and 480 nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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18-Mar-2004
 
 
Ma'adim Vallis From the Top
Ma'adim Vallis From the Top

This is a still from an animation showing the geography of Ma'adim Vallis, a valley or channel that enters Gusev Crater. The view of the crater is from the northwest, which is not the direction from which Spirit approached the crater as it landed.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit's Destination (panorama)
Spirit's Destination (panorama)

This panoramic image mosaic from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit panoramic camera, shows the rover's destination toward the hills nicknamed the "Columbia Hills," on the right. The rover's heatshield can be seen on the left as a tiny bright dot in the distance, just under the horizon. Dark drift material can be seen in the image center. The rover is currently positioned outside the view of this image, on the right. This image was taken on sols 68 and 69 of Spirit's mission (March 12 and 13, 2004) from the location the rover first reached on the western rim of the crater. The image is in approximate true color, based on a scaling of data from the red, green and blue (750 nanometers, 530 nanometers, and 480 nanometers) filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Spirit's Destination
Spirit's Destination

This image, cropped from a larger panoramic image mosaic taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit panoramic camera, shows the rover's destination toward the hills nicknamed the "Columbia Hills." The rover is currently positioned outside the view of this image, on the right. This image was taken on sols 68 and 69 of Spirit's mission (March 12 and 13, 2004) from the location the rover first reached on the western rim of the crater. The image is in approximate true color, based on a scaling of data from the red, green and blue (750 nanometers, 530 nanometers, and 480 nanometers) filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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17-Mar-2004
 
 
Almost Like Being at 'Bonneville'
Almost Like Being at 'Bonneville'

The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this 3-D navigation camera mosaic of the crater nicknamed "Bonneville" on the 67th martian day, or sol, of its mission. The rover's solar panels can be seen in the foreground, and just above the far crater rim, on the left side, is the rover's heatshield, which is visible as a tiny reflective speck.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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16-Mar-2004
 
 
Drifts of Dust or Something Else?
Drifts of Dust or Something Else?

While the interior and far walls of the crater dubbed "Bonneville" can be seen in the background, the dominant foreground features in this 180-degree navigation camera mosaic are the wind-deposited drifts of dust or sand. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit completed this mosaic on sol 71, March 15, 2004, from its newest location at the rim of "Bonneville" crater.

Scientists are interested in these formations in part because they might give insight into the processes that formed some of the material within the crater. Thermal emission measurements by the rover indicate that the dark material just below the far rim of this crater is spectrally similar to rocks that scientists have analyzed along their journey to this location. They want to know why this soil-like material has a spectrum that more closely resembles rocks rather than other soils examined so far. The drifts seen in the foreground of this mosaic might have the answer. Scientists hypothesize that these drifts might consist of wind-deposited particles that are the same as the dark material found against the back wall of the crater. If so, Spirit may spend time studying the material and help scientists understand why it is different from other fine-grained material seen at Gusev.

The drifts appear to be lighter in color than the dark material deposited on the back wall of the crater. They might be covered by a thin deposit of martian dust, or perhaps the drift is like other drifts seen during Spirit's journey and is just a collection of martian dust.

To find out, Spirit will spend some of sol 72 digging its wheels into the drift to uncover its interior. After backing up a bit, Spirit will use the panoramic camera and miniature thermal emission spectrometer to analyze the scuffed area. If the interior material has a similar spectrum to the dark deposit in the crater, then Spirit will most likely stay here a little longer to study the drift with the instruments on its robotic arm. If the material is uniform - that is, dusty all the way down, Spirit will most likely move off to another target.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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15-Mar-2004
 
 
Bonneville in Color
Bonneville in Color

The rim and interior of a crater nicknamed "Bonneville" dominate this 180-degree, false-color mosaic of images taken by the panoramic camera of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. Spirit recorded this view on the rover's 68th sol, March 12, 2004, one sol after reaching this location. The rover remaining here in part to get this very high-resolution, color mosaic, from which scientists can gain insight about the depth of the surface material at Bonneville and make future observation plans. On sol 71, Spirit was instructed to drive approximately 15 meters (49 feet) along the crater rim to a new vantage point.

The image is a false-color composite made from frames taken with the camera's L2, L5 and L6 filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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12-Mar-2004  
 
At the Rim, Looking In
At the Rim, Looking In

The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this navigation camera mosaic of the crater called "Bonneville" after driving approximately 13 meters (42.7 feet) to get a better vantage point. Spirit's current position is close enough to the edge to see the interior of the crater, but high enough and far enough back to get a view of all of the walls. Because scientists and rover controllers are so pleased with this location, they will stay here for at least two more martian days, or sols, to take high resolution panoramic camera images of "Bonneville" in its entirety. Just above the far crater rim, on the left side, is the rover's heatshield, which is visible as a tiny reflective speck.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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11-Mar-2004  
 
A Deep Dish for Discovery
A Deep Dish for Discovery

On the 66th martian day, or sol, of its mission, the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit finished a drive and sent back this navigation camera image mosaic revealing "Bonneville" crater in its entirety.

Spirit has spent more than 60 sols, two thirds of the nominal mission, en route to the rim of the large crater dubbed "Bonneville." The rover stopped on occasion to examine rocks along the way, many of which probably found their resting places after being ejected from the nearly 200-meter-diameter (656-foot) crater.

The science team sent the rover to "Bonneville" to find out more about where the rocks they have examined so far originated. Reaching the rim of this deep dish has been a major priority since day one.

According to science team member Dr. John Grant of Washington D.C.'s National Air and Space Museum, the "Bonneville" crater could be a giant window into the ancient past of the Gusev landing site. He said, "The rocks that we see scattered around our landing site may be ejecta from inside "Bonneville," but we won't know that for sure until we actually investigate the crater. We can look at the rocks' form and chemistry, but we don't know how they fit into the big picture. If we can find their occurrence within the walls of "Bonneville" crater, we'll be one step closer to understanding the processes that shaped the entire Gusev area over time."

Most scientists agree that a fitting prize for this long drive would be to find an outcrop of bedrock material that was not transported, but formed in the crater. When a meteorite slams into the ground and creates a crater, it throws surface debris out to the sides, revealing the older, mostly buried material, a sort of natural "road cut." The real gem would be to find exposed layers of the ancient rock within the "cut" walls of the crater, which would give scientists a peek into how the area formed. "The Gusev landing site is at least partially covered in a layer of ejecta material," said Grant. "As Mars was repeatedly pelted with meteorites, the ejecta kept piling on top of other ejecta leaving a blanket of debris and little trace of what the original surface was. We want to see beneath all that impact debris, into what is really filling the Gusev crater. Hopefully "Bonneville" crater will give us a clue to what the material is at the top of that pile."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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'Bonneville' and Beyond
'Bonneville' and Beyond

On the 66th martian day, or sol, of its mission, the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit finished a drive and sent back this navigation camera panorama showing "Bonneville" crater and the rocky plains surrounding it. The rover's solar panels are visible in the foreground, and the to right, the Columbia Hills complex. Zooming into the picture, the rover's parachute can be seen as a tiny white dot at the far left, and just above the far crater rim is the heatsheild, visible as a tiny reflective speck.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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10-Mar-2004  
 
A Long Way From Home
A Long Way From Home

This pair of pieced-together images was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's rear navigation camera on March 6, 2004. It reveals the long and rocky path of nearly 240 meters (787 feet) that Spirit had traveled since safely arriving at Gusev Crater on Jan. 3, 2004.

The lander can still be seen in the distance, but will never be "home" again for the journeying rover. This image is also a tribute to the effectiveness of the autonomous navigation system that the rovers use during parts of their martian drives. Instead of driving directly through the "hollow" seen in the middle right of the image, the autonomous navigation system guided Spirit around the high ridge bordering the hollow.

In the two days after these images were taken, Spirit has traveled roughly 60 meters (197 feet) farther toward its destination at the crater nicknamed "Bonneville."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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A Glimpse of What's to Come
A Glimpse of What's to Come

This 360-degree navigation camera mosaic was taken by Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on March 9, 2004, after a drive that brought the rover to less than 20 meters (66 feet) from the rim of the crater nicknamed "Bonneville." The vista provides a glimpse of the far side of the rim. It also includes a close-up look at a 1-meter-tall (3.3-foot-tall) rock called "The Hole Point," which has served as a beacon for scientists and rover operators in guiding the rover toward the crest of this rim.

Scientists are anxious for Spirit to get to the very edge of the crater rim and peer down inside. From that vantage, Spirit will examine the floor and walls of the crater, where layers may be exposed that are older than the surface material on the terrain outside of the crater.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/USGS
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26-Feb-2004  
 
Long and Winding Road
Long and Winding Road

This image shows the path the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has traveled since it landed 53 martian days, or sols, ago. "Laguna Hollow," the shallow depression where Spirit dug a trench, can be seen to the right of center. Spirit stayed at "Laguna Hollow" for 3 sols, investigating the fine-grained soil contained there and the trench it dug with one of its wheels. The rover is headed northeast toward a large crater nicknamed "Bonneville." This panoramic camera image was taken from the rover's new location, a region dubbed "Middle Ground" located 98 meters (322 feet) away from "Bonneville."

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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The Bumpy Road Ahead
The Bumpy Road Ahead

This image shows the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's view of the rocky terrain that lies between it and its intended target, the large crater dubbed "Bonneville." The landscape here is roughly two times as bumpy and more difficult to traverse than that crossed so far. Spirit has currently stopped to examine the soil and rocks at a region nicknamed "Middle Ground." The rover is 98 meters (322 feet) away from "Bonneville" and facing northeast. The large rock called "Humphries" can be seen in the lower right corner. The image was taken on the 53rd martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission by the rover's panoramic camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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19-Feb-2004  
 
Sampling the Varying Textures of Mars
Sampling the Varying Textures of Mars

This image shows the shallow depression dubbed "Laguna Hollow" before the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit drove into it to sample its bed of fine sediments on the 45th sol or day, of its mission (Feb. 18, 2004). The hollow provides scientists with a laboratory for studying the atmospheric processes that shaped Mars because, in contrast to surrounding rocky terrain, it contains windblown dust and possibly salty clumps of soil. Spirit is scheduled to dig a trench at the bottom of "Laguna Hollow" on sol 47. The image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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17-Feb-2004  
 
Spirit Keeps Rollin'

This 360-degree mosaic panorama image, taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, includes a view of the lander. The lander is located to the south-southwest of the rover, which is moving toward a crater nicknamed "Bonneville. Sleepy Hollow can be seen to the right of the lander. As of Sol 44, which ended on February 17, 2004, the rover had moved a total of 106.6 meters (350 feet) since leaving the lander on January 15, 2004. This image was taken on Sol 39 (February 11, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Spirit Spies 'Bonneville'
Spirit Spies "Bonneville"

This mosaic image from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the area in front of the rover after its record 27.5 meters (90.2 feet) drive on Sol 43, which ended February 16, 2004. Spirit is looking toward one of its future targets, the rim of a crater nicknamed "Bonneville."

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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27-Jan-2004  
 
NASA Dedicates Martian Landmarks To Apollo 1 Crew
NASA Dedicates Martian Landmarks To Apollo 1 Crew

An image taken from Spirit's PanCam looking west depicts the nearby hills named after the astronauts of the Apollo 1. The crew of Apollo 1 perished in flash fire during a launch pad test of their Apollo spacecraft at Kennedy Space Center, Fl. on January 27, 1967.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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14-Jan-2004  
 
Location of Spirit's Homeland
Location of Spirit's Homeland

This image shows where Earth would set on the martian horizon from the perspective of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit if it were facing northwest atop its lander at Gusev Crater. Earth cannot be seen in this image, but engineers have mapped its location. This image mosaic was taken by the hazard-avoidance camera onboard Spirit.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Panoramic View of Lander During Turn
Panoramic View of Lander During Turn

This 360-degree panoramic mosaic image composed of data from the hazard avoidance camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a view of the lander from under the rover deck. The images were taken as the rover turned from its landing position 95 degrees toward the northwest side of the lander.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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13-Jan-2004  
 
Hills Over Yonder
Hills Over Yonder

The arrows in this 360-degree panoramic view of the martian surface identify hills and craters on the martian horizon that scientists can easily find with orbiters Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey. The image was taken on Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/MSSS
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In the Far East
In the Far East

In the distance stand the east hills, which are closest to the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit in comparison to other hill ranges seen on the martian horizon. The top of the east hills are approximately 2 to 3 kilometers (1 to 2 miles) away from the rover's approximate location. This image was taken on Mars by the rover's panoramic camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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12-Jan-2004  
 
Mars in Full View
Mars in Full View

This is a medium-resolution version of the first 360-degree panoramic view of the martian surface, taken on Mars by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's panoramic camera. Part of the spacecraft can be seen in the lower corner regions. (A higher-resolution image will be made available once it has been processed.)

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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10-Jan-2004  
 
Martian Landscape in 3-D
Martian Landscape in 3-D

This 3-D stereo image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's navigation camera shows the rover's lander and, in the background, the surrounding martian terrain.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Hazy Martian Skies
Hazy Martian Skies

This image mosaic taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's panoramic camera shows the hills southeast of Spirit's landing site. Like a smoggy day in Los Angeles, dusty martian skies limit how much detail can be seen. This lack in visibility is demonstrated by comparing hills on the left to those on the right, located nearly two times farther away. The left panel of this image was captured in the late morning martian hours, looking toward the Sun. The right image was taken in the early afternoon, when the Sun was higher and the skies appeared darker.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell University
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09-Jan-2004  
 
Mars Through Infrared Eyes of Spirit-3
Mars Through Infrared Eyes of Spirit-3

This image shows the martian terrain through the eyes of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's mini-thermal emission spectrometer, an instrument that detects the infrared light, or heat, emitted by objects. The different colored circles show a spectrum of soil and rock temperatures, with red representing warmer regions and blue, cooler. Clusters of cool rocks stand out to the left, and a warm, dusty depression similar to the one dubbed Sleepy Hollow can be seen to the upper right. Scientists and engineers will use this data to pinpoint features of interest, and to plot a safe course for the rover free of loose dust. The mini-thermal emission spectrometer data are superimposed on an image taken by the rover's panoramic camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Arizona State University/Cornell University
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Mars Through Infrared Eyes of Spirit-3 - Zoomed Mars Through Infrared Eyes of Spirit-3 - Zoomed
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08-Jan-2004  
 
Martian Surface at an Angle
Martian Surface at an Angle

This latest color "postcard from Mars," taken on Sol 5 by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, looks to the north. The apparent slope of the horizon is due to the several-degree tilt of the lander deck. On the left, the circular topographic feature dubbed Sleepy Hollow can be seen along with dark markings that may be surface disturbances caused by the airbag-encased lander as it bounced and rolled to rest. A dust-coated airbag is prominent in the foreground, and a dune-like object that has piqued the interest of the science team with its dark, possibly armored top coating, can be seen on the right.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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05-Jan-2004  
 
Left Panorama of Spirit's Landing Site
Left Panorama of Spirit's Landing Site

This is a version of the first 3-D stereo image from the rover's navigation camera, showing only the view from the left stereo camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. The left and right camera images are combined to produce a 3-D image.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Right Panorama of Spirit's Landing Site
Right Panorama of Spirit's Landing Site

This is a version of the first 3-D stereo image from the rover's navigation camera, showing only the view from the right stereo camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. The left and right camera images are combined to produce a 3-D image.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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First 3-D Panorama of Spirit's Landing Site
First 3-D Panorama of Spirit's Landing Site

This sprawling look at the martian landscape surrounding the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is the first 3-D stereo image from the rover's navigation camera. A surface depression nicknamed "Sleepy Hollow" can be seen to center left of the image. Scientists theorize that this topographic feature, measuring about 10 meters (30 feet) in diameter and located approximately 10 to 20 meters (30 to 60 feet) away from Spirit, is either an impact crater or a product of wind erosion.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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04-Jan-2004  
 
First Look at Spirit on Mars
First Look at Spirit on Mars

This mosaic image taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a 360 degree panoramic view of the rover on the surface of Mars.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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