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Panoramas: Spirit
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25-Oct-2006
 
 
'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' (Stereo)
'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' (Stereo)

This 360-degree view, called the "McMurdo" panorama, comes from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. From April through October 2006, Spirit has stayed on a small hill known as "Low Ridge." There, the rover's solar panels are tilted toward the sun to maintain enough solar power for Spirit to keep making scientific observations throughout the winter on southern Mars. This view of the surroundings from Spirit's "Winter Haven" is presented as a stereo anaglyph to show the scene three-dimensionally when viewed through red-blue glasses (with the red lens on the left).

Oct. 26, 2006, marks Spirit's 1,000th sol of what was planned as a 90-sol mission. (A sol is a Martian day, which lasts 24 hours, 39 minutes, 35 seconds). The rover has lived through the most challenging part of its second Martian winter. Its solar power levels are rising again. Spring in the southern hemisphere of Mars will begin in early 2007. Before that, the rover team hopes to start driving Spirit again toward scientifically interesting places in the "Inner Basin" and "Columbia Hills" inside Gusev crater. The McMurdo panorama is providing team members with key pieces of scientific and topographic information for choosing where to continue Spirit's exploration adventure.

The Pancam began shooting component images of this panorama during Spirit's sol 814 (April 18, 2006) and completed the part shown here on sol 932 (Aug. 17, 2006). The panorama was acquired using all 13 of the Pancam's color filters, using lossless compression for the red and blue stereo filters, and only modest levels of compression on the remaining filters. The overall panorama consists of 1,449 Pancam images and represents a raw data volume of nearly 500 megabytes. It is thus the largest, highest-fidelity view of Mars acquired from either rover. Additional photo coverage of the parts of the rover deck not shown here was completed on sol 980 (Oct. 5 , 2006). The team is completing the processing and mosaicking of those final pieces of the panorama, and that image will be released on the Web shortly to augment this McMurdo panorama view.

This beautiful scene reveals a tremendous amount of detail in Spirit's surroundings. Many dark, porous-textured volcanic rocks can be seen around the rover, including many on Low Ridge. Two rocks to the right of center, brighter and smoother-looking in this image and more reflective in infrared observations by Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer, are thought to be meteorites. On the right, "Husband Hill" on the horizon, the rippled "El Dorado" sand dune field near the base of that hill, and lighter-toned "Home Plate" below the dunes provide context for Spirit's travels since mid-2005. Left of center, tracks and a trench dug by Spirit's right-front wheel, which no longer rotates, have exposed bright underlying material. This bright material is evidence of sulfur-rich salty minerals in the subsurface, which may provide clues about the watery past of this part of Gusev Crater.

Spirit has stayed busy at Winter Haven during the past six months even without driving. In addition to acquiring this spectacular panorama, the rover team has also acquired significant new assessments of the elemental chemistry and mineralogy of rocks and soil targets within reach of the rover's arm. The team plans soon to have Spirit drive to a very nearby spot on Low Ridge to access different rock and soil samples while maintaining a good solar panel tilt toward the sun for the rest of the Martian winter.

Despite the long span of time needed for acquiring this 360-degree view -- a few images at a time every few sols over a total of 119 sols because the available power was so low -- the lighting and color remain remarkably uniform across the mosaic. This fact attests to the repeatability of wintertime sols on Mars in the southern hemisphere. This is the time of year when Mars is farthest from the sun, so there is much less dust storm and dust devil activity than at other times of the year.

The left-eye and right-eye mosaics combined into this anaglyph were generated from a hybrid combination of the Pancam's near-infrared and blue filters to bring out details that are otherwise visible only in some of the filters.

Image credit:NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (359 kB) | Large (110.6 MB)
 
'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' (False Color)
'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' (False Color)

This 360-degree view, called the "McMurdo" panorama, comes from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. From April through October 2006, Spirit has stayed on a small hill known as "Low Ridge." There, the rover's solar panels are tilted toward the sun to maintain enough solar power for Spirit to keep making scientific observations throughout the winter on southern Mars. This view of the surroundings from Spirit's "Winter Haven" is presented in exaggerated color to enhance color differences among rocks, soils and sand.

Oct. 26, 2006, marks Spirit's 1,000th sol of what was planned as a 90-sol mission. (A sol is a Martian day, which lasts 24 hours, 39 minutes, 35 seconds). The rover has lived through the most challenging part of its second Martian winter. Its solar power levels are rising again. Spring in the southern hemisphere of Mars will begin in early 2007. Before that, the rover team hopes to start driving Spirit again toward scientifically interesting places in the "Inner Basin" and "Columbia Hills" inside Gusev crater. The McMurdo panorama is providing team members with key pieces of scientific and topographic information for choosing where to continue Spirit's exploration adventure.

The Pancam began shooting component images of this panorama during Spirit's sol 814 (April 18, 2006) and completed the part shown here on sol 932 (Aug. 17, 2006). The panorama was acquired using all 13 of the Pancam's color filters, using lossless compression for the red and blue stereo filters, and only modest levels of compression on the remaining filters. The overall panorama consists of 1,449 Pancam images and represents a raw data volume of nearly 500 megabytes. It is thus the largest, highest-fidelity view of Mars acquired from either rover. Additional photo coverage of the parts of the rover deck not shown here was completed on sol 980 (Oct. 5 , 2006). The team is completing the processing and mosaicking of those final pieces of the panorama, and that image will be released on the Web shortly to augment this McMurdo panorama view.

This beautiful scene reveals a tremendous amount of detail in Spirit's surroundings. Many dark, porous-textured volcanic rocks can be seen around the rover, including many on Low Ridge. Two rocks to the right of center, brighter and smoother-looking in this image and more reflective in infrared observations by Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer, are thought to be meteorites. On the right, "Husband Hill" on the horizon, the rippled "El Dorado" sand dune field near the base of that hill, and lighter-toned "Home Plate" below the dunes provide context for Spirit's travels since mid-2005. Left of center, tracks and a trench dug by Spirit's right-front wheel, which no longer rotates, have exposed bright underlying material. This bright material is evidence of sulfur-rich salty minerals in the subsurface, which may provide clues about the watery past of this part of Gusev Crater.

Spirit has stayed busy at Winter Haven during the past six months even without driving. In addition to acquiring this spectacular panorama, the rover team has also acquired significant new assessments of the elemental chemistry and mineralogy of rocks and soil targets within reach of the rover's arm. The team plans soon to have Spirit drive to a very nearby spot on Low Ridge to access different rock and soil samples while maintaining a good solar panel tilt toward the sun for the rest of the Martian winter.

Despite the long span of time needed for acquiring this 360-degree view -- a few images at a time every few sols over a total of 119 sols because the available power was so low -- the lighting and color remain remarkably uniform across the mosaic. This fact attests to the repeatability of wintertime sols on Mars in the southern hemisphere. This is the time of year when Mars is farthest from the sun, so there is much less dust storm and dust devil activity than at other times of the year.

This is a false-color, red-green-blue composite panorama generated from images taken through the Pancam's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (245 kB) | Large (79.3 MB)
 
'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven'
'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven'

This 360-degree view, called the "McMurdo" panorama, comes from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. From April through October 2006, Spirit has stayed on a small hill known as "Low Ridge." There, the rover's solar panels are tilted toward the sun to maintain enough solar power for Spirit to keep making scientific observations throughout the winter on southern Mars. This view of the surroundings from Spirit's "Winter Haven" is presented in approximately true color.

Oct. 26, 2006, marks Spirit's 1,000th sol of what was planned as a 90-sol mission. (A sol is a Martian day, which lasts 24 hours, 39 minutes, 35 seconds). The rover has lived through the most challenging part of its second Martian winter. Its solar power levels are rising again. Spring in the southern hemisphere of Mars will begin in early 2007. Before that, the rover team hopes to start driving Spirit again toward scientifically interesting places in the "Inner Basin" and "Columbia Hills" inside Gusev crater. The McMurdo panorama is providing team members with key pieces of scientific and topographic information for choosing where to continue Spirit's exploration adventure.

The Pancam began shooting component images of this panorama during Spirit's sol 814 (April 18, 2006) and completed the part shown here on sol 932 (Aug. 17, 2006). The panorama was acquired using all 13 of the Pancam's color filters, using lossless compression for the red and blue stereo filters, and only modest levels of compression on the remaining filters. The overall panorama consists of 1,449 Pancam images and represents a raw data volume of nearly 500 megabytes. It is thus the largest, highest-fidelity view of Mars acquired from either rover. Additional photo coverage of the parts of the rover deck not shown here was completed on sol 980 (Oct. 5 , 2006). The team is completing the processing and mosaicking of those final pieces of the panorama, and that image will be released on the Web shortly to augment this McMurdo panorama view.

This beautiful scene reveals a tremendous amount of detail in Spirit's surroundings. Many dark, porous-textured volcanic rocks can be seen around the rover, including many on Low Ridge. Two rocks to the right of center, brighter and smoother-looking in this image and more reflective in infrared observations by Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer, are thought to be meteorites. On the right, "Husband Hill" on the horizon, the rippled "El Dorado" sand dune field near the base of that hill, and lighter-toned "Home Plate" below the dunes provide context for Spirit's travels since mid-2005. Left of center, tracks and a trench dug by Spirit's right-front wheel, which no longer rotates, have exposed bright underlying material. This bright material is evidence of sulfur-rich salty minerals in the subsurface, which may provide clues about the watery past of this part of Gusev Crater.

Spirit has stayed busy at Winter Haven during the past six months even without driving. In addition to acquiring this spectacular panorama, the rover team has also acquired significant new assessments of the elemental chemistry and mineralogy of rocks and soil targets within reach of the rover's arm. The team plans soon to have Spirit drive to a very nearby spot on Low Ridge to access different rock and soil samples while maintaining a good solar panel tilt toward the sun for the rest of the Martian winter.

Despite the long span of time needed for acquiring this 360-degree view -- a few images at a time every few sols over a total of 119 sols because the available power was so low -- the lighting and color remain remarkably uniform across the mosaic. This fact attests to the repeatability of wintertime sols on Mars in the southern hemisphere. This is the time of year when Mars is farthest from the sun, so there is much less dust storm and dust devil activity than at other times of the year.

This is an approximately true-color, red-green-blue composite panorama generated from images taken through the Pancam's 600-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 480-nanometer filters. This "natural color" view is the rover team's best estimate of what the scene would look like if we were there and able to see it with our own eyes.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (264 kB) | Large (87.3 MB)
 
'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' (Color Stereo)
'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' (Color Stereo)

This 360-degree view, called the "McMurdo" panorama, comes from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. From April through October 2006, Spirit has stayed on a small hill known as "Low Ridge." There, the rover's solar panels are tilted toward the sun to maintain enough solar power for Spirit to keep making scientific observations throughout the winter on southern Mars. This view of the surroundings from Spirit's "Winter Haven" is presented as a stereo anaglyph to show the scene three-dimensionally when viewed through red-blue glasses (with the red lens on the left).

Oct. 26, 2006, marks Spirit's 1,000th sol of what was planned as a 90-sol mission. (A sol is a Martian day, which lasts 24 hours, 39 minutes, 35 seconds). The rover has lived through the most challenging part of its second Martian winter. Its solar power levels are rising again. Spring in the southern hemisphere of Mars will begin in early 2007. Before that, the rover team hopes to start driving Spirit again toward scientifically interesting places in the "Inner Basin" and "Columbia Hills" inside Gusev crater. The McMurdo panorama is providing team members with key pieces of scientific and topographic information for choosing where to continue Spirit's exploration adventure.

The Pancam began shooting component images of this panorama during Spirit's sol 814 (April 18, 2006) and completed the part shown here on sol 932 (Aug. 17, 2006). The panorama was acquired using all 13 of the Pancam's color filters, using lossless compression for the red and blue stereo filters, and only modest levels of compression on the remaining filters. The overall panorama consists of 1,449 Pancam images and represents a raw data volume of nearly 500 megabytes. It is thus the largest, highest-fidelity view of Mars acquired from either rover. Additional photo coverage of the parts of the rover deck not shown here was completed on sol 980 (Oct. 5 , 2006). The team is completing the processing and mosaicking of those final pieces of the panorama, and that image will be released on the Web shortly to augment this McMurdo panorama view.

This beautiful scene reveals a tremendous amount of detail in Spirit's surroundings. Many dark, porous-textured volcanic rocks can be seen around the rover, including many on Low Ridge. Two rocks to the right of center, brighter and smoother-looking in this image and more reflective in infrared observations by Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer, are thought to be meteorites. On the right, "Husband Hill" on the horizon, the rippled "El Dorado" sand dune field near the base of that hill, and lighter-toned "Home Plate" below the dunes provide context for Spirit's travels since mid-2005. Left of center, tracks and a trench dug by Spirit's right-front wheel, which no longer rotates, have exposed bright underlying material. This bright material is evidence of sulfur-rich salty minerals in the subsurface, which may provide clues about the watery past of this part of Gusev Crater.

Spirit has stayed busy at Winter Haven during the past six months even without driving. In addition to acquiring this spectacular panorama, the rover team has also acquired significant new assessments of the elemental chemistry and mineralogy of rocks and soil targets within reach of the rover's arm. The team plans soon to have Spirit drive to a very nearby spot on Low Ridge to access different rock and soil samples while maintaining a good solar panel tilt toward the sun for the rest of the Martian winter.

Despite the long span of time needed for acquiring this 360-degree view -- a few images at a time every few sols over a total of 119 sols because the available power was so low -- the lighting and color remain remarkably uniform across the mosaic. This fact attests to the repeatability of wintertime sols on Mars in the southern hemisphere. This is the time of year when Mars is farthest from the sun, so there is much less dust storm and dust devil activity than at other times of the year.

The left-eye and right-eye mosaics combined into this anaglyph were generated using the Pancam's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 480-nanometer filters from the left camera and the 750-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters from the right camera, color balanced in such a way so that when the combination is fused by the viewer's eye and brain, the scene is perceived in three dimensions in natural or approximately true color.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (258 kB) | Large (86.0 MB)
11-Sep-2006
 
 
This view is a stereo anaglyph of the Everest panorama, showing it in three dimensions to viewers using red-blue stereo glasses.
Stereo Version of Spirit's 'Everest' Panorama

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to record a 360-degree vista, dubbed the "Everest" panorama, from the top of "Husband Hill" in early October 2005. This view is a stereo anaglyph of the Everest panorama, showing it in three dimensions to viewers using red-blue stereo glasses.

The images combined into this anaglyph were taken through the Pancam's blue L7 and R1 filters during Spirit's 620th through 622nd Martian days (Oct. 1 through Oct. 3, 2005). Geometric and brightness adjustments have been applied. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with rover tilt removed.

For additional information about the Everest panorama, see http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03095 .

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (170 kB) | Large (73.9 MB)

Related Animation (11.4 MB)
 
This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair for creating three-dimensional versions of the Everest panorama.
Left Eye for Stereo Pair of Spirit's 'Everest' Panorama

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to record a 360-degree vista, dubbed the "Everest" panorama, from the top of "Husband Hill" in early October 2005. This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair for creating three-dimensional versions of the Everest panorama.

The images combined into this mosaic were taken through the Pancam's blue L7 filter during Spirit's 620th through 622nd Martian days (Oct. 1 through Oct. 3, 2005). Geometric and brightness adjustments have been applied. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with rover tilt removed.

For additional information about the Everest panorama, see http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03095 .

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (164 kB) | Large (37.3 MB)
 
This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair for creating three-dimensional versions of the Everest panorama.
Right Eye for Stereo Pair of Spirit's 'Everest' Panorama

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to record a 360-degree vista, dubbed the "Everest" panorama, from the top of "Husband Hill" in early October 2005. This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair for creating three-dimensional versions of the Everest panorama.

The images combined into this mosaic were taken through the Pancam's blue R1 filter during Spirit's 620th through 622nd Martian days (Oct. 1 through Oct. 3, 2005). Geometric and brightness adjustments have been applied. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with rover tilt removed.

For additional information about the Everest panorama, see http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03095 .

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (164 kB) | Large (37 MB)
 
This view is a stereo anaglyph of the Seminole panorama, showing it in three dimensions to viewers using red-blue stereo glasses.
Stereo Version of Spirit's 'Seminole' Panorama

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to record a 360-degree vista, dubbed the "Seminole" panorama, from partway down the south side of "Husband Hill" in November 2005. This view is a stereo anaglyph of the Seminole panorama, showing it in three dimensions to viewers using red-blue stereo glasses.

The images combined into this anaglyph were taken through the Pancam's infrared L2 and R2 filters during Spirit's 672nd through 677th Martian days (Nov. 23 through Nov. 28, 2005). Geometric and brightness adjustments have been applied. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with rover tilt removed.

For additional information about the Seminole panorama, see http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03640 .

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (198 kB) | Large (61.8 MB)

Related Animation (4 MB)
 
This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair for creating three-dimensional versions of the Seminole panorama.
Left Eye for Stereo Pair of Spirit's 'Seminole' Panorama

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to record a 360-degree vista, dubbed the "Seminole" panorama, from partway down the south side of "Husband Hill" in November 2005. This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair for creating three-dimensional versions of the Seminole panorama.

The images combined into this mosaic were taken through the Pancam's infrared L2 filter during Spirit's 672nd through 677th Martian days (Nov. 23 through Nov. 28, 2005). Geometric and brightness adjustments have been applied. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with rover tilt removed.

For additional information about the Seminole panorama, see http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03640 .

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (192 kB) | Large (34.1 MB)
 
This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair for creating three-dimensional versions of the Seminole panorama.
Right Eye for Stereo Pair of Spirit's 'Seminole' Panorama

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to record a 360-degree vista, dubbed the "Seminole" panorama, from partway down the south side of "Husband Hill" in November 2005. This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair for creating three-dimensional versions of the Seminole panorama.

The images combined into this mosaic were taken through the Pancam's infrared R2 filter during Spirit's 672nd through 677th Martian days (Nov. 23 through Nov. 28, 2005). Geometric and brightness adjustments have been applied. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with rover tilt removed.

For additional information about the Seminole panorama, see http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03640 .

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (189 kB) | Large (32.7 MB)
 
This view is a stereo anaglyph of the Thanksgiving panorama, showing it in three dimensions to viewers using red-blue stereo glasses.
Stereo Version of Spirit's 'Thanksgiving' Panorama

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to record a 360-degree vista, dubbed the "Thanksgiving" panorama, from the northwestern side of "Husband Hill" in late 2004. This view is a stereo anaglyph of the Thanksgiving panorama, showing it in three dimensions to viewers using red-blue stereo glasses.

The images combined into this anaglyph were taken through the Pancam's infrared L2 and R2 filters during Spirit's 318th through 325th Martian days (Nov. 24 through Dec. 2, 2004). Geometric and brightness adjustments have been applied. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with rover tilt removed.

For additional information about the Thanksgiving panorama, see http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07334 .

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (145 kB) | Large (52.3 MB)

Related Animation (8.8 MB)
 
This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair for creating three-dimensional versions of the Thanksgiving panorama.
Left Eye for Stereo Pair of Spirit's 'Thanksgiving' Panorama

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to record a 360-degree vista, dubbed the "Thanksgiving" panorama, from the northwestern side of "Husband Hill" in late 2004. This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair for creating three-dimensional versions of the Thanksgiving panorama.

The images combined into this mosaic were taken through the Pancam's infrared L2 filter during Spirit's 318th through 325th Martian days (Nov. 24 through Dec. 2, 2004). Geometric and brightness adjustments have been applied. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with rover tilt removed.

For additional information about the Thanksgiving panorama, see http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07334 .

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (203 kB) | Large (36.5 MB)
 
This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair for creating three-dimensional versions of the Thanksgiving panorama.
Right Eye for Stereo Pair of Spirit's 'Thanksgiving' Panorama

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to record a 360-degree vista, dubbed the "Thanksgiving" panorama, from the northwestern side of "Husband Hill" in late 2004. This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair for creating three-dimensional versions of the Thanksgiving panorama.

The images combined into this mosaic were taken through the Pancam's infrared R2 filter during Spirit's 318th through 325th Martian days (Nov. 24 through Dec. 2, 2004). Geometric and brightness adjustments have been applied. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with rover tilt removed.

For additional information about the Thanksgiving panorama, see http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07334 .

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (206 kB) | Large (35.2 MB)
09-Jun-2006
 
 
This approximate true-color image looks toward the north. 'Husband Hill,' which Spirit was climbing a year ago, is on the horizon near the center. 'Home Plate' is a between that hill and the rover's current position. Wheel tracks imprinted when Spirit drove south from Home Plate can be seen crossing the middle distance of the image from the center to the right.
View Northward from Spirit's Winter Roost

One part of the research program that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is conducting while sitting at a favorable location for wintertime solar energy is the most detailed panorama yet taken on the surface of Mars. This view is a partial preliminary product from the continuing work on the full image, which will be called the "McMurdo Panorama."

Spirit's panoramic camera (Pancam) began taking exposures for the McMurdo Panorama on the rover's 814th Martian day (April 18, 2006). The rover has accumulated more than 900 exposures for this panorama so far, through all of the Pancam mineralogy filters and using little or no image compression. Even with a tilt toward the winter sun, the amount of energy available daily is small, so the job will still take one to two more months to complete.

This portion of the work in progress looks toward the north. "Husband Hill," which Spirit was climbing a year ago, is on the horizon near the center. "Home Plate" is a between that hill and the rover's current position. Wheel tracks imprinted when Spirit drove south from Home Plate can be seen crossing the middle distance of the image from the center to the right.

This is an approximate true-color rendering combining exposures taken through three of the panoramic camera's filters. The filters used are centered on wavelengths of 750 nanometers, 530 nanometers and 430 nanometers.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (344 kB) | Large (2.5 MB)
 
This false-color image looks toward the north. 'Husband Hill,' which Spirit was climbing a year ago, is on the horizon near the center. 'Home Plate' is a between that hill and the rover's current position. Wheel tracks imprinted when Spirit drove south from Home Plate can be seen crossing the middle distance of the image from the center to the right.
View Northward from Spirit's Winter Roost (False Color)

One part of the research program that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is conducting while sitting at a favorable location for wintertime solar energy is the most detailed panorama yet taken on the surface of Mars. This view is a partial preliminary product from the continuing work on the full image, which will be called the "McMurdo Panorama."

Spirit's panoramic camera (Pancam) began taking exposures for the McMurdo Panorama on the rover's 814th Martian day (April 18, 2006). The rover has accumulated more than 900 exposures for this panorama so far, through all of the Pancam mineralogy filters and using little or no image compression. Even with a tilt toward the winter sun, the amount of energy available daily is small, so the job will still take one to two more months to complete.

This portion of the work in progress looks toward the north. "Husband Hill," which Spirit was climbing a year ago, is on the horizon near the center. "Home Plate" is a between that hill and the rover's current position. Wheel tracks imprinted when Spirit drove south from Home Plate can be seen crossing the middle distance of the image from the center to the right.

This view is presented in false color to emphasize differences among rock and soil materials. It combines exposures taken through three of the panoramic camera's filters, centered on wavelengths of 750 nanometers, 530 nanometers and 430 nanometers.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium Image (385 kB) | Large (2.6 MB)
30-May-2006
 
 
This black-and-white image mosaic shows a pair of rover tracks moving toward the viewer across a sandy, rippled surface. The track on the right is actually a shallow trench created by Spirit's dragging right front wheel. The track on the left shows horizontally oriented grooves created by the three fully operating wheels on the rover's left side. In the background, on the horizon, is the slope of one of the
Disturbed Soil Along the Path from 'Tyrone'(Panorama)

This view shows tracks created by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit while traveling from the bright soil deposit seen in the upper right, informally named "Tyrone," to the vehicle's current location, dubbed "Winter Haven."

Spirit parked at "Winter Haven" on a small north-facing slope to maximize solar energy input during the Martian winter. This stayover presents an opportunity to do more intensive, long-term investigations of the rover's surroundings than are typically possible during warmer seasons when the vehicle spends more time driving from place to place. One of these activities is assessing the influence of wind by monitoring surface changes. Experience from the Viking Landers of the 1970s suggests that wind-related surface changes are more likely to occur in recently disturbed soil. This mosaic view combines two cameras' images of disturbed soil in Spirit's tracks, taken shortly after arriving at Winter Haven. It will provide a comparison with future images to help reveal any wind-related surface changes.

The mosaic includes images of the rover's tracks obtained through the left eye of the navigation camera on the rover's 807th Martian day, or sol (April 11, 2006), merged with higher-resolution images obtained through the 750-nanomater filter in the left eye of the panoramic camera on sol 835 (May 9, 2006).

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
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01-May-2006
 
 
This image shows a sweeping black-and-white panorama of the rounded, knob-like peak of 'Husband Hill' in the distance, flanked by an undulating, rocky ridge on the right. Beneath the peak is a horizontal, roughly oval ripple field crisscrossed by wavy crests of sand that have migrated in a row from left to right. In the foreground, scattered rocks and surface wrinkles cast long shadows from left to right across the rough, sandy landscape between the rover and the dune field. Near the bottom center of the panorama is a pair of rover tracks.
Low Sun from 'Low Ridge'

A spectacular field of Martian sand ripples separates NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit from the slopes of "Husband Hill." It has been 200 Martian days, or sols, since the rover started a descent from the top of the peak to the rover's current position on "Low Ridge." Looking back to the north on sol 813 (April 17, 2006), Spirit acquired this blue-filter (436-nanometer) view with the right panoramic camera (Pancam) while the Sun was low in the sky late in the afternoon. Because of the low-angle lighting (sunlight is coming from the left), images like this provide superb views of subtle textures in the topography both near and far. Husband Hill, where the rover was perched late last summer, rises prominently just left of center in this view. A 150-meter wide (500 foot) field of curving sand ripples named "El Dorado" lies at the base of Husband Hill.

By collecting photos like this at different times of day, when lighting comes from different directions, scientists can distinguish surface properties such as color and reflectivity from topography and roughness. By separating these components they can map more details of the geologic terrain, providing new clues about the geologic history of Gusev Crater.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
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25-Apr-2006
 
 
This mosaic of images shows the leading edges of the rover's solar panels at the bottom edge in the foreground. Above that is a sandy, hilly landscape. Beyond the rover and slightly to the right is a small peak, the slopes of which bear a scattering of large, dark rocks full of tiny holes. To the left of that, in the middle of the image on the horizon, is 'McCool Hill,' the tallest hill in view. Leading away from the rover in the direction of 'McCool' and then meandering off to the left is a pair of rover tracks. The right track is a furrow, the left shows wheel imprints.
Spirit Greets New Terrain, New Season on Mars

In time to survive the Martian winter, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has driven to and parked on a north-facing slope in the "Columbia Hills." This vantage point will optimize solar power during the upcoming winter season and maximize the vehicle's ability to communicate with the NASA Odyssey orbiter.

Top science priorities for the coming months are a detailed, 360-degree panorama using all 13 filters of the panoramic camera, a study of surface and subsurface soil properties, and monitoring of the atmosphere and its changes. The planned subsurface soil experiments will be a first for the Mars Exploration Rover mission. To conduct the study, Spirit will use the brush on the rock abrasion tool to carefully sweep away soil, much the way an archaeologist uses a brush to uncover artifacts. At each level, Spirit will measure the mineral and chemical properties and assess the physical nature (such as grain size, texture, hardness) of the material, using the Athena science instruments on the robotic arm. Of particular interest are vertical variations in soil characteristics that may indicate water-related deposition of sulfates and other minerals.

Panoramic images will provide important information about the nature and origin of surrounding rocks and soils. Spirit will also study the mineralogy of the surrounding terrain using the thermal emission spectrometer and search for surface changes caused by high winds. After the winter solstice in August, depending on energy levels, scientists may direct the rover to pivot around the disabled, right front wheel to get different targets within reach of the arm. When the winter season is over and solar energy levels rise again, scientists will direct Spirit to leave its winter campaign site and continue examining the "Columbia Hills."

Spirit acquired the images in this mosaic with the navigation camera on the rover's 807th Martian day, or sol, of exploring Gusev Crater on Mars (April 11, 2006). Approaching from the east are the rover's tracks, including a shallow trench created by the dragging front wheel. On the horizon, in the center of the panorama, is "McCool Hill." This view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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04-Apr-2006
 
 
This panorama image shows brightly colored soil which was churned up by Spirit on its eastward drive toward the northwestern flank of 'McCool Hill'. This view is an approximately true-coloe rendering.
Bright Soil Near 'McCool'

While driving eastward toward the northwestern flank of "McCool Hill," the wheels of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit churned up the largest amount of bright soil discovered so far in the mission. This image from Spirit's panoramic camera (Pancam), taken on the rover's 788th Martian day, or sol, of exploration (March 22, 2006), shows the strikingly bright colors and large extent of the materials uncovered.

Several days earlier, Spirit's wheels unearthed a small patch of light-toned material informally named "Tyrone." In images from Spirit's panoramic camera, "Tyrone" strongly resembled both "Arad" and "Paso Robles," two patches of light-toned soils discovered earlier in the mission. Spirit found "Paso Robles" in 2005 while climbing "Cumberland Ridge" on the western slope of "Husband Hill." In early January 2006, the rover discovered "Arad" on the basin floor just south of "Husband Hill." Spirit's instruments confirmed that those soils had a salty chemistry dominated by iron-bearing sulfates. Spirit's Pancam and miniature thermal emission spectrometer examined this most recent discovery, and researchers will compare its properties with the properties of those other deposits.

These discoveries indicate that salty, light-toned soil deposits might be widely distributed on the flanks and valley floors of the "Columbia Hills" region in Gusev Crater on Mars. The salts, which are easily mobilized and concentrated in liquid solution, may record the past presence of water. So far, these enigmatic materials have generated more questions than answers, however, and as Spirit continues to drive across this region in search of a safe winter haven, the team continues to formulate and test hypotheses to explain the rover's most fascinating recent discovery.

This view is an approximately true-color rendering that combines separate images taken through the Pancam's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
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This false-color panorama image shows brightly colored soil which was churned up by Spirit on its eastward drive toward the northwestern flank of 'McCool Hill'.
Bright Soil Near 'McCool' (False Color)

While driving eastward toward the northwestern flank of "McCool Hill," the wheels of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit churned up the largest amount of bright soil discovered so far in the mission. This image from Spirit's panoramic camera (Pancam), taken on the rover's 788th Martian day, or sol, of exploration (March 22, 2006), shows the strikingly bright tone and large extent of the materials uncovered.

Several days earlier, Spirit's wheels unearthed a small patch of light-toned material informally named "Tyrone." In images from Spirit's panoramic camera, "Tyrone" strongly resembled both "Arad" and "Paso Robles," two patches of light-toned soils discovered earlier in the mission. Spirit found "Paso Robles" in 2005 while climbing "Cumberland Ridge" on the western slope of "Husband Hill." In early January 2006, the rover discovered "Arad" on the basin floor just south of "Husband Hill." Spirit's instruments confirmed that those soils had a salty chemistry dominated by iron-bearing sulfates. Spirit's Pancam and miniature thermal emission spectrometer examined this most recent discovery, and researchers will compare its properties with the properties of those other deposits.

These discoveries indicate that salty, light-toned soil deposits might be widely distributed on the flanks and valley floors of the "Columbia Hills" region in Gusev Crater on Mars. The salts, which are easily mobilized and concentrated in liquid solution, may record the past presence of water. So far, these enigmatic materials have generated more questions than answers, however, and as Spirit continues to drive across this region in search of a safe winter haven, the team continues to formulate and test hypotheses to explain the rover's most fascinating recent discovery.

This image is a false-color rendering using using Pancam's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
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This 3-D panorama image shows brightly colored soil which was churned up by Spirit on its eastward drive toward the northwestern flank of 'McCool Hill'.
Bright Soil Near 'McCool'(3-D)

While driving eastward toward the northwestern flank of "McCool Hill," the wheels of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit churned up the largest amount of bright soil discovered so far in the mission. This image from Spirit's panoramic camera (Pancam), taken on the rover's 788th Martian day, or sol, of exploration (March 22, 2006), shows the strikingly bright tone and large extent of the materials uncovered.

Several days earlier, Spirit's wheels unearthed a small patch of light-toned material informally named "Tyrone." In images from Spirit's panoramic camera, "Tyrone" strongly resembled both "Arad" and "Paso Robles," two patches of light-toned soils discovered earlier in the mission. Spirit found "Paso Robles" in 2005 while climbing "Cumberland Ridge" on the western slope of "Husband Hill." In early January 2006, the rover discovered "Arad" on the basin floor just south of "Husband Hill." Spirit's instruments confirmed that those soils had a salty chemistry dominated by iron-bearing sulfates. Spirit's Pancam and miniature thermal emission spectrometer examined this most recent discovery, and researchers will compare its properties with the properties of those other deposits.

These discoveries indicate that salty, light-toned soil deposits might be widely distributed on the flanks and valley floors of the "Columbia Hills" region in Gusev Crater on Mars. The salts, which are easily mobilized and concentrated in liquid solution, may record the past presence of water. So far, these enigmatic materials have generated more questions than answers, however, and as Spirit continues to drive across this region in search of a safe winter haven, the team continues to formulate and test hypotheses to explain the rover's most fascinating recent discovery.

This stereo view combines images from the two blue (430-nanometer) filters in the Pancam's left and right "eyes." The image should be viewed using red-and-blue stereo glasses, with the red over your left eye.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
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06-Mar-2006
 
 
This image shows finely layered rocks interspersed with sand sloping downward and inward toward the center of the panorama from either side. Here and there on the outcrop, a chunk of rock has become displaced and lies at an angle on the surface. In the distance, in the center just beneath the orangish sky, is 'McCool Hill.' The sand is reddish brown and rocks covered with sand are red. Bare rock surfaces and edges are blue-gray.
'Gibson' Panorama by Spirit at 'Home Plate' (False Color)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired this high-resolution view of intricately layered exposures of rock while parked on the northwest edge of the bright, semi-circular feature known as "Home Plate." The rover was perched at a 27-degree upward tilt while creating the panorama, resulting in the "U" shape of the mosaic. In reality, the features along the 1-meter to 2-meter (3-foot to 6-foot) vertical exposure of the rim of Home Plate in this vicinity are relatively level. Rocks near the rover in this view, known as the "Gibson" panorama, include "Barnhill," "Rogan," and "Mackey."

Spirit took this panorama of 246 separate images using 6 different filters on the Pancam on martian days, or sols, 748-751 (Feb. 9-12, 2006). The field of view in this cylindrical projection covers 160 degrees of terrain from side to side. This image is a false-color rendering using using Pancam's 753-nanometer, 535-namometer, and 432-nanometer filters, but presented to enhance the many striking but subtle color differences between rocks and soils in the scene. Image-to-image seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Cornell
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This image shows finely layered rocks interspersed with sand sloping downward and inward toward the center of the panorama from either side. Here and there on the outcrop, a chunk of rock has become displaced and lies at an angle on the surface. In the distance, in the center just beneath the orangish sky, is 'McCool Hill.' All surfaces are reddish-brown.
'Gibson' Panorama by Spirit at 'Home Plate'

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired this high-resolution view of intricately layered exposures of rock while parked on the northwest edge of the bright, semi-circular feature known as "Home Plate." The rover was perched at a 27-degree upward tilt while creating the panorama, resulting in the "U" shape of the mosaic. In reality, the features along the 1-meter to 2-meter (3-foot to 6-foot) vertical exposure of the rim of Home Plate in this vicinity are relatively level. Rocks near the rover in this view, known as the "Gibson" panorama, include "Barnhill," "Rogan," and "Mackey."

Spirit took this panorama of 246 separate images using 6 different filters on the Pancam on martian days, or sols, 748-751 (Feb. 9-12, 2006). The field of view in this cylindrical projection covers 160 degrees of terrain from side to side. This image is an approximate true-color rendering using Pancam's 753-nanometer, 535-namometer, and 432-nanometer filters. Image-to-image seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Cornell
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This panorama shows two rock-strewn slopes on the left and right sides of a broad, U-shaped dip in the middle. The sandy surface in front of the rover is reddish brown; individual rocks and more distant features are blue-gray with occasional streaks of reddish-colored sand. In the distance are the broad slopes of 'McCool Hill.' Above that is an orangish-yellow sky. In the foreground, just in front of the rover, some of the panels of the image are missing and show up as black rectangular gaps at the lower front edge.
Spirit's 'Paige' Panorama of the Interior of 'Home Plate' (False Color)

On Feb. 19, 2006, the 758th Martian day of exploration of the red planet by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, the rover acquired this panoramic view of the interior of "Home Plate," a circular topographic feature amid the "Columbia Hills." This view, called the "Paige" panorama, is from the top of Home Plate. It shows layered rocks exposed at the edge as well as dark rocks exhibiting both smooth and sponge-like "scoriaceous" textures. To the east from this vantage point, "McCool Hill" looms on the horizon. At the base of McCool Hill is a reddish outcrop called "Oberth," which Spirit may explore during the rapidly approaching Martian winter. "Von Braun" and "Goddard" hills are partially visible beyond the opposite rim of Home Plate.

The limited spatial coverage of this panorama is the result of steadily decreasing power available to the rover for science activities as the Martian winter arrives and the sun traces a lower path across the sky. The rover team anticipates that the north-facing slopes of McCool Hill should sufficiently tilt the rover's solar panels toward the sun to allow Spirit to survive the winter.

This panorama consists of 72 separate images from 4 different Pancam filters, and covers about 230 degrees of terrain around the rover. The slightly upturned edges of the mosaic result from the rover's tilt of 17 degrees toward the interior of "Home Plate" when the images were acquired. This is a false-color rendering of a cylindrical projection using the Pancam's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters, enhanced to show the many striking but subtle color differences between rocks, soils, and hills in the scene. Image-to-image seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Cornell
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This panorama shows two reddish-brown, rock-strewn slopes on the left and right sides of a broad, U-shaped dip in the middle. In the distance are the broad slopes of 'McCool Hill.' Above that is an orangish-yellow sky. In the foreground, just in front of the rover, some of the panels of the image are missing and show up as black rectangular gaps at the lower front edge.
Spirit's 'Paige' Panorama of the Interior of 'Home Plate'

On Feb. 19, 2006, the 758th Martian day of exploration of the red planet by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, the rover acquired this panoramic view of the interior of "Home Plate," a circular topographic feature amid the "Columbia Hills." This view, called the "Paige" panorama, is from the top of Home Plate. It shows layered rocks exposed at the edge as well as dark rocks exhibiting both smooth and sponge-like "scoriaceous" textures. To the east from this vantage point, "McCool Hill" looms on the horizon. At the base of McCool Hill is a reddish outcrop called "Oberth," which Spirit may explore during the rapidly approaching Martian winter. "Von Braun" and "Goddard" hills are partially visible beyond the opposite rim of Home Plate.

The limited spatial coverage of this panorama is the result of steadily decreasing power available to the rover for science activities as the Martian winter arrives and the sun traces a lower path across the sky. The rover team anticipates that the north-facing slopes of McCool Hill should sufficiently tilt the rover's solar panels toward the sun to allow Spirit to survive the winter.

This panorama consists of 72 separate images from 4 different Pancam filters, and covers about 230 degrees of terrain around the rover. The slightly upturned edges of the mosaic result from the rover's tilt of 17 degrees toward the interior of "Home Plate" when the images were acquired. This is an approximate true-color rendering of a cylindrical projection using the Pancam's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters. Image-to-image seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Cornell
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01-Mar-2006
 
 
In this image, a flat-topped hill or plateau - nicknamed 'Home Plate' -- rises prominently in the foreground, almost precisely centered in front of a gently sloping, sharply outlined peak in the distance that makes up part of the horizon. The top half of the plateau consists of solid, horizontally streaked rocks interrupted here and there by diagonal, near-vertical cracks and shallow pockets filled with sediment. Some of the horizontal features have sharp, forward-protruding edges. In a few places, boulders of vertically stacked plates of rock have come loose and lie haphazardly on the surface. The lower half of the hill is covered with sand and loose rocks. The flat top of the plateau is covered with small rocks and sediment. To the right of the plateau is a shallow, sandy valley that descends to the floor of Gusev Crater. A pair of rover tracks cross the valley from the right. In the distance is the flat martian horizon and a few of the hills that make up the rim of Gusev Crater. On the right of the valley are the nearby slopes of another rounded peak of the 'Columbia Hills.'
Rover Team Decides: Safety First

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit recorded this view while approaching the northwestern edge of "Home Plate," a circular plateau-like area of bright, layered outcrop material roughly 80 meters (260 feet) in diameter. The images combined into this mosaic were taken by Spirit's navigation camera during the rover's 746th, 748th and 750th Martian days, or sols (Feb. 7, 9 and 11, 2006).

With Martian winter closing in, engineers and scientists working with NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit decided to play it safe for the time being rather than attempt to visit the far side of Home Plate in search of rock layers that might show evidence of a past watery environment. This feature has been one of the major milestones of the mission. Though it's conceivable that rock layers might be exposed on the opposite side, sunlight is diminishing on the rover's solar panels and team members chose not to travel in a counterclockwise direction that would take the rover to the west and south slopes of the plateau. Slopes in that direction are hidden from view and team members chose, following a long, thorough discussion, to have the rover travel clockwise and remain on north-facing slopes rather than risk sending the rover deeper into unknown terrain.

In addition to studying numerous images from Spirit's cameras, team members studied three-dimensional models created with images from the Mars Orbiter Camera on NASA's Mars Globel Surveyor orbiter. The models showed a valley on the southern side of Home Plate, the slopes of which might cause the rover's solar panels to lose power for unknown lengths of time. In addition, images from Spirit's cameras showed a nearby, talus-covered section of slope on the west side of Home Plate, rather than exposed rock layers scientists eventually hope to investigate.

Home Plate has been on the rover's potential itinerary since the early days of the mission, when it stood out in images taken by the Mars Orbiter Camera shortly after the rover landed on Mars. Spirit arrived at Home Plate after traveling 4 miles (6.4 kilometers) across the plains of Gusev Crater, up the slopes of "West Spur" and "Husband Hill," and down again. Scientists are studying the origin of the layering in the outcrop using the Athena science instruments on the rover's arm.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/NMMNH
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17-Feb-2006
 
 
This Pancam image is of an outcrop nicknamed 'Barnhill' and surrounding rocks on the north side of Home Plate, showing the most spectacular layering that Spirit has seen.
Spirit Hits a Home Run

This week, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit arrived at "Home Plate," a feature that, when seen from orbit, looks like the home plate of a baseball diamond. Home Plate is a roughly circular feature about 80 meters (260 feet) in diameter that might be an old impact crater or volcanic feature. The Spirit team has been eager to get to Home Plate and has been enjoying distant views of the feature and a curious "bathtub ring" of light-colored materials along its edges. The team has pushed the rover hard to get here before the deep Martian winter sets in.

After scientists had identified Home Plate from orbit, they had many theories about what it could be and what they might see. But when Spirit's panoramic camera (Pancam) took this and other images, the science team was stunned. This Pancam image is of an outcrop nicknamed "Barnhill" and surrounding rocks on the north side of Home Plate, showing the most spectacular layering that Spirit has seen.

Pancam and microscopic imager views of the layers in the rocks reveal a range of grain sizes and textures that change from the lower to the upper part of the outcrop. This may help scientists figure out how the material was emplaced. Spirit is also conducting work with its arm instruments to figure out the chemistry and mineralogy of the rocks. Scientists have several hypotheses about what Home Plate could be, including features made by volcanoes and impact craters, and ways that water could have played a role. They are busy trying to figure out what the data from Spirit is really telling us.

As Spirit works at Home Plate during February, the science team is choosing informal names for rocks from the great players and managers of the Negro Leagues of baseball. This outcrop, "Barnhill," is informally named for David Barnhill, the ace of the New York Cubans' pitching staff during the early 1940s. He compiled an 18-3 record in 1941 and defeated Satchel Paige in the 1942 East-West all-star game. Other rocks in the area are informally named for Josh Gibson, "Bullet Joe" Rogan, and Cumberland Posey. Stay tuned this month, as the Baseball Hall of Fame elects more players from the Negro Leagues and Spirit continues to examine these spectacular rocks.

Spirit took this mosaic of images using the panoramic camera on the rover's 746th day, or sol (Feb. 7, 2006), of exploring Mars. Scientists are acquiring and processing image data for more views of the same terrain in approximate true color.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/UNM
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04-Jan-2006
 
 
This panorama image shows rippled sand deposits in Gusev Crater on Mars
Intricately Rippled Sand Deposits

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit welcomed the beginning of 2006 on Earth by taking this striking panorama of intricately rippled sand deposits in Gusev Crater on Mars. This is an approximate true-color rendering of the "El Dorado" ripple field provided by Spirit over the New Year's holiday weekend. The view spans about 160 degrees in azimuth from left to right and consists of images acquired by Spirit's panoramic camera on Spirit's 708th and 710th Martian days, or sols, (Dec. 30, 2005 and Jan. 1, 2006). Spirit used the Pancam's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters to capture the colors on Mars. Scientists have eliminated seams between individual frames in the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see. Spirit spent several days acquiring images, spectral data, and compositional and mineralogical information about these large sand deposits before continuing downhill toward "Home Plate."

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
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