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Press Release Images: Opportunity
01-Apr-2004
 
Rock Bites into 'Bounce'
Rock Bites into "Bounce"

This panoramic camera image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity features the 6.44 millimeter (0.25 inch) deep hole ground into the rock dubbed "Bounce" by the rover's rock abrasion tool. The tool took 2 hours and 15 minutes to grind the hole on sol 66 of the rover's journey. A combination of limited solar power and the rockís jagged texture led the rock abrasion tool team to set very aggressive grinding parameters to ensure that the end result was a full circle, suitable for a thorough read from the roverís spectrometers.

Bounceís markedly different appearance (when compared to the rocks that were previously examined in the Eagle Crater outcrop) made it a natural target for rover research. In order to achieve an ideal position from which to grind into the rock, Opportunity moved in very close with its right wheel next to Bounce. In this image, the panoramic camera on the roverís mast is looking down, catching the tip of the solar panel which partially blocks the full circle ground by the rock abrasion tool.

The outer ring consists of the cuttings from the rock, pushed out by the brushes on the grinding instrument. The dark impression at the top of the outer circle was caused by the instrumentís contact mechanism which serves to stabilize it while grinding.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (38 kB) | Large (163 kB)
Bounce Rock Snapshot
Bounce Rock Snapshot

This Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity panoramic camera image shows "Bounce Rock," a rock the airbag-packaged rover struck while rolling to a stop on January 24, 2004. This is the largest rock for as far as the eye can see, approximately 35 centimeters (14 inches) long and 10 centimeters (4 inches) high. There appears to be a dusty coating on the top of parts of the rock, which may have been broken when it was struck by the airbags. The rock was about 5 meters (16 feet) from the rover when this image was obtained. This is an enhanced color composite image from sol 36 of the rover's journey, generated using the camera's L2 (750 nanometer), L5 (530 nanometer), and L6 (480 nanometer) filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Large (210 kB)
Bounce Rock Close-Up
Bounce Rock Close-Up

This high-resolution panoramic camera blue filter image of the rock dubbed "Bounce" was obtained up close, just before the rover placed its instruments on the rock for detailed study. The rock has a number of shiny surfaces and textures on it, some of which are unlike those seen in the Eagle Crater rock outcrop. Also, the rock was apparently moved or shaken when it was hit with the airbags, as can be seen by the gap and cracks in the soil around the rock. This image from sol 65 of the rover's journey was acquired using the panoramic camera's 430 nanometer filter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (53 kB) | Large (521 kB)
Bounce Rock Dimple
Bounce Rock Dimple

This panoramic camera image shows the hole drilled by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rock abrasion tool into the rock dubbed "Bounce" on Sol 65 of the rover's journey. The tool drilled about 7 millimeters (0.3 inches) into the rock and generated small piles of "tailings" or rock dust around the central hole, which is about 4.5 centimeters (1.7 inches) across. The image from sol 66 of the mission was acquired using the panoramic camera's 430 nanometer filter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (35 kB) | Large (134 kB)
 
 
Browse Image (16 kB) | Large (485 kB)
Lion King Surveys Homeland

This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows one octant of a larger panoramic image which has not yet been fully processed. The full panorama, dubbed "Lion King" was obtained on sols 58 and 60 of the mission as the rover was perched at the lip of Eagle Crater, majestically looking down into its former home. It is the largest panorama yet obtained by either rover. The octant, which faces directly into the crater, shows features as small as a few millimeters across in the field near the rover arm, to features a few meters across or larger on the horizon.

The full panoramic image was taken in eight segments using six filters per segment, for a total of 558 images and more than 75 megabytes of data. This enhanced color composite was assembled from the infrared (750 nanometer), green (530 nanometer), and violet (430 nanometer) filters. Additional lower elevation tiers were added relative to other panoramas to ensure that the entire crater was covered in the mosaic.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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On a Roll
On a Roll

This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity front left hazard-avoidance camera shows a pebble caught in rover's front right wheel. The image from sol 63 of the mission was taken as the rover approached the rock dubbed "Bounce" for analysis.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (37 kB) | Large (259 kB)

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