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Press Release Images: Opportunity
s
28-Apr-2004
Mars Rovers Finish Primary Mission and Roll Onward
Full Press Release
Trench Reveals Two Faces of Soils
Trench Reveals Two Faces of Soils

This approximate true-color image mosaic from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a trench dug by the rover in the vicinity of the "Anatolia" region. Two imprints from the rover's Mossbauer spectrometer instrument were left in the exposed soils. Detailed comparisons between soils exposed at the surface and those found at depth reveal that surface soils have higher levels of hematite while subsurface soils show fine particles derived from basalt. The trench is approximately 11 centimeters deep. This image was taken on sol 81 with the panoramic camera's 430-, 530- and 750-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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A Fruitful Journey
A Fruitful Journey

This overview map made from images taken by the camera on the Mars Global Surveyor orbiter illustrates the path that the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has taken from its first sol on the red planet through its 91st sol. After thoroughly examining its "Eagle Crater" landing-site, the rover moved onto the plains of Meridiani Planum, stopping to examine a curious trough and a target within it called "Anatolia." Following that, Opportunity approached and remotely studied the rocky dish called "Fram Crater." As of its 91st sol (April 26, 2004), the rover has traveled about 811 meters (.5 miles) and currently sits about 160 meters (525 feet) from the rim of its next target, "Endurance Crater."

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/OSU/MSSS
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Similar on the Inside (pre-grinding)
Similar on the Inside (pre-grinding)

This approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity show the rock called "Pilbara" located in the small crater dubbed "Fram." The rock appears to be dotted with the same "blueberries," or spherules, found at "Eagle Crater." Spirit drilled into this rock with its rock abrasion tool. After analyzing the hole with the rover's scientific instruments, scientists concluded that Pilbara has a similar chemical make-up, and thus watery past, to rocks studied at Eagle Crater. This image was taken with the panoramic camera's 480-, 530- and 600-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Similar on the Inside (post-grinding)
Similar on the Inside (post-grinding)

This approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity show the hole drilled into the rock called "Pilbara," which is located in the small crater dubbed "Fram." Spirit drilled into this rock with its rock abrasion tool. The rock appears to be dotted with the same "blueberries," or spherules, found at "Eagle Crater." After analyzing the hole with the rover's scientific instruments, scientists concluded that Pilbara has a similar chemical make-up, and thus watery past, to rocks studied at Eagle Crater. This image was taken with the panoramic camera's 480-, 530- and 600-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Door to 'Pilbara'

This mosaic of five images taken by the microscopic imager on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sol 87 shows the hole drilled by the rover's rock abrasion tool into the rock dubbed "Pilbara." A sliced "blueberry," or spherule, which is darker and harder than the rest of the rock, can be seen near the center of the hole. The rock abrasion process left a pile of rock powder around the side of the hole, and to a lesser degree, inside the hole. The grinding penetrated an area of rock about 7.2 millimeters (about 0.28 inches) deep and 4.5 centimeters (about 1.8 inches) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS
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'Hamersley' : Not Quite Like 'Eagle Crater'

This approximate true-color image mosaic from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the target nicknamed "Hamersley" within "Fram Crater." The nature of the outcrop material seen in this location is visibly disrupted. Some areas also have layering that may be distinctive from what scientists saw previously in "Eagle Crater." Spirit is traveling toward a large crater dubbed "Endurance." It may return to Fram for further analysis of its rocks and soils if time permits. The images in this mosaic were taken on sol 87 with the panoramic camera's 480-, 530- and 600-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Opportunity Spies Its Target
Opportunity Spies Its Target

This is a forward-looking view of the Meridiani Planum plains that lie between the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity and its primary drive target, "Endurance Crater." The images in this image mosaic were taken by the rover's panoramic camera on sol 88.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Two Years Before Mission Success

This scene from JPL's Spacecraft Assembly Facility in April 2002 shows early work on the spacecraft then known as Mars Exploration Rover 1 and later named Opportunity. The electronics were spread out on table tops, with the cable mock-up for the cruise stage in the foreground. Other than the X-band radio, none of the hardware delivered by this point flew. The first flight-vehicle test of entry, descent and landing sequences was still 6 months away.

Image credit: NASA/JPLs
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One Year Before Mission Success

This scene from NASA Kennedy Space Center in April 2003 shows work during final processing of the spacecraft then known as Mars Exploration Rover B and later named Opportunity. At this point, the rover was fully assembled for flight and being prepared for final integration with its lander.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Opportunity at Time of Full Mission Success

Animation software used by engineers for planning rover drives portrays the location of the NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on April 26, 2004, at the successful completion of 90 sols of operating on Mars, the amount of time set in advance for the rover's primary mission. The scene is from the panoramic camera, with the crater dubbed "Endurance" on the horizon, still a few days' drives away.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Ames
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