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Press Release Images: Opportunity
01-Jul-2004
 
Three Fresh Exposures, Stretched Color
Three Fresh Exposures, Stretched Color

This panoramic camera image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been processed using a technique known as a decorrelation stretch to exaggerate the colors. The area in the image includes three holes created inside "Endurance Crater" by Opportunity's rock abrasion tool between sols 143 and 148 (June 18 and June 23, 2004). Because color variations are so subtle in the pictured area, stretched images are useful for discriminating color differences that can alert scientists to compositional and textural variations. For example, without the exaggeration, no color difference would be discernable among the tailings left behind after the grinding of these holes, but in this stretched image, the tailings around "London" (top) appear more red than those of the other holes ("Virginia," middle, and "Cobble Hill," bottom). Scientists believe that is because the rock abrasion tool sliced through two "blueberries," or spherules (visible on the upper left and upper right sides of the circle). When the blades break up these spherules, composed of mostly gray hematite, the result is a bright red powder. In this image, you can see the rock layers that made the team want to grind holes in each identified layer. The top layer is yellowish red, the middle is yellowish green and the lower layer is green. Another advantage to viewing this stretched image is the clear detail of the distribution of the rock abrasion tool tailings (heading down-slope) and the differences in rock texture. This image was created using the 753-, 535- and 432-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Three Fresh Exposures, Enhanced Color
Three Fresh Exposures, Enhanced Color

This enhanced-color panoramic camera image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity features three holes created by the rock abrasion tool between sols 143 and 148 (June 18 and June 23, 2004) inside "Endurance Crater." The enhanced image makes the red colors a little redder and blue colors a little bluer, allowing viewers to see differences too subtle to be seen without the exaggeration. When compared with an approximately true color image, the tailings from the rock abrasion tool and the interior of the abraded holes are more prominent in this view. Being able to discriminate color variations helps scientists determine rocks' compositional differences and texture variations. This image was created using the 753-, 535- and 432-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium (480 kB) | Large (1.9 MB)
Three Fresh Exposures in 'Endurance' Layers
Three Fresh Exposures in 'Endurance' Layers

This image, from the panoramic camera, is an approximately true color rendering of the slope of "Endurance Crater," which NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is currently exploring. Between sols 143 and 148 (June 18 to June 23, 2004), the rover's rock abrasion tool ground into three targets: "London" in the "D" layer (top) is 4.5 millimeters (0.18 inches) deep; "Virginia" in the "C" layer (middle) is 4.3 millimeters (0.17 inches) deep; and "Cobble Hill" in the "B" layer (bottom) is 3 millimeters (0.12 inches) deep. The shadow from the rover's camera mast is visible in the lower right corner of the image. This image was captured using the 601-, 535- and 482-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image | Medium (278 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)

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