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Press Release Images: Opportunity
25-Nov-2009
 
Approaching 'Marquette Island'
Approaching 'Marquette Island'

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity took this picture of a rock informally named "Marquette Island" as the rover was approaching the rock for investigations that have suggested the rock is a stony meteorite.

Opportunity used its navigation camera to record this image during the 2,056th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars (Nov. 5, 2009).

The dark-toned rock stood out so prominently in more distant views on earlier sols that the rover team referred to it as "Sore Thumb" before assigning the Marquette name in accord with an informal naming convention of choosing island names for the isolated rocks that the rover is finding as it crosses a relatively barren plain on its long trek from Victoria Crater toward Endeavour Crater.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Examining 'Marquette Island'
Examining 'Marquette Island'

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used the wire brush of its rock abrasion tool during the rover's 2,070th Martian day, or sol (Nov. 19, 2009), to scour dust from a circular target area on a rock called "Marquette Island." The brushed target area, called "Peck Bay," is visible as a dark circle about 5 centimeters (2 inches) in diameter just below the tool turret at the end of the rover's robotic arm in this image. The image was taken later the same sol by the rover's front hazard-avoidance camera.

Opportunity is performing an extensive analysis of this rock, which initial investigation suggests may be a stony meteorite.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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