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Press Release Images: Spirit
07-Jan-2004
Rover Airbag to Get Another Tug
Full Press Release
Mars in Stereo
Mars in Stereo

This image shows the martian terrain in 3-D. The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured the image with its two high-resolution stereo panoramic cameras.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (66 kB) | Large (1 MB)
Shrouded in Dust
Shrouded in Dust

Dust-covered rocks can be seen in this portion of the 3-D image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. Scientists plan to use the rover's rock abrasion tool to grind away dusty and weathered rock, exposing fresh rock underneath.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (35 kB) | Large (62 kB)
Airbag Trails
Airbag Trails

This segment of the first color image from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rover's airbag trails. These depressions in the soil were made when the airbags were deflated and retracted after landing.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (35 kB) | Large (120 kB)
Airbag Trails-2
Airbag Trails-2

This segment of the first color image from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rover's airbag trails (upper left). These depressions in the soil were made when the airbags were deflated and retracted after landing.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (42 kB) | Large (375 kB)
Plaque on Spirit Honors Columbia Astronauts
Plaque on Spirit Honors Columbia Astronauts

A plaque commemorating the astronauts who died in the tragic accident of the Space Shuttle Columbia is mounted on the back of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's high-gain antenna. The plaque was designed by Mars Exploration Rover engineers. The astronauts are also honored by the new name of the rover landing site, the Columbia Memorial Station. This image was taken on Mars by Spirit's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (75 kB) | Large (135 kB)
Dust in the Wind
Dust in the Wind

This plot shows the estimated change in dust levels from December 2003 to early January 2004 at Gusev Crater (red curve) and Meridiani Planum (black curve), the two Mars Exploration Rover landings sites. The measurements, retrieved from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer, indicate that a large regional dust storm beginning in mid-December raised significant dust near Meridiani. Smaller amounts of dust were spread globally by winds, the effects of which were seen at Gusev Crater. For comparison, a dust optical depth value of 1.0 would correspond to a very smoggy day in Los Angeles or Houston, and a value of 0.1 to a relatively clear day in Los Angeles.

Image credit: NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University
Browse Image (75 kB) | Large (135 kB)

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