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Press Release Images: Spirit
05-Mar-2004
 
What Lies Ahead
What Lies Ahead

This map shows the path the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit will travel toward its future target, the large crater dubbed "Bonneville." The red line indicates Spirit's travels up to the 59th martian day, or sol, of its journey, and the blue line, the route it will follow. Engineers pinpointed the rover's exact location by comparing images taken by the panoramic camera on the rover (inset panels) to those acquired during descent by the descent image motion estimation system camera (underlying map).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/Ohio State University
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A Hole in Humphrey
A Hole in Humphrey

This image taken by the navigation camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a hole drilled by the rover in the rock dubbed "Humphrey." Spirit ground into the rock with the rock abrasion tool located on its robotic arm on the 60th martian day, or sol, of its mission. Scientists are investigating the freshly exposed rock with the rover's suite of scientific instruments, also located on the rover's arm. Spirit is on its way to a large crater nicknamed "Bonneville."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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A Hole In Humphrey
A Hole In Humphrey

This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed "Humphrey" and the hole drilled into the rock by the rover. Spirit ground into the rock with the rock abrasion tool located on its robotic arm on the 60th martian day, or sol, of its mission. Scientists are investigating the freshly exposed rock with the scientific instruments on the arm. Spirit is about halfway to a large crater nicknamed "Bonneville." This image was made by combining data from the camera's different wavelength filters. The particular filters used were chosen to enhance features of scientific interest.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Humphrey on the Inside
Humphrey on the Inside

This image taken by the microscopic imager on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a close-up look at the rock dubbed "Humphrey." The image was taken after the rover drilled into the rock with its rock abrasion tool, exposing fresh rock underneath. Scientists examined "Humphrey" for clues to its past with scientific instruments on the rover's robotic arm. This image was taken on the 60th martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission. The rover is on its way to a large crater nicknamed "Bonneville."

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS
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Natural or Manmade?
Natural or Manmade?

This image taken by the microscopic imager onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a close-up look at the rock dubbed "Humphrey." The image was taken after the rover drilled into the rock with its rock abrasion tool, exposing fresh rock underneath. The circled areas represent features that scientists have identified as being either natural or induced by grinding processes. The yellow circle shows a natural mark; the green and blue circles highlights droppings thought to be left by the rover's Moessbauer spectrometer; and the red circle contains a natural indentation. The image was taken on the 60th martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS
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Rock Dusting Leaves 'Mickey Mouse' Mark
Rock Dusting Leaves "Mickey Mouse" Mark

This image taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed "Humphrey" and the circular areas on the rock that were wiped off by the rover. The rover used a brush on its rock abrasion tool to clean these spots before examining them with its miniature thermal emission spectrometer. Later, the rover drilled into the rock with its rock abrasion tool, exposing fresh rock underneath.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS
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