NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology JPL HOME EARTH SOLAR SYSTEM STARS & GALAXIES SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY JPL Email News RSS Mobile Video
Follow this link to skip to the main content
JPL banner - links to JPL and CalTech
left nav graphic Overview Science Technology The Mission People Spotlights Events Multimedia All Mars
Mars for Kids
Mars for Students
Mars for Educators
Mars for Press
+ Mars Home
+ Rovers Home
Multimedia
Summary
Images
Press Release Images
Spirit
Opportunity
All Raw Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Panoramas
Spirit
Opportunity
3-D Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Special-Effects Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Spacecraft
Mars Artwork
Landing Sites
Videos
Podcasts
Press Release Images: Spirit
17-May-2004
Mars Rover Inspects Stone Ejected From Crater
Full Press Release
 
Temperature Map, 'Bonneville Crater'
Temperature Map, "Bonneville Crater"

Rates of change in surface temperatures during a martian day indicate differences in particle size in and near "Bonneville Crater." Temperature information from the miniature thermal emission spectrometer on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is overlaid onto a view of the site from Spirit's panoramic camera. This sequence of five frames begins at the top with data from 10:15 a.m. local solar time at Spirit's location inside Mars' Gusev Crater. The times of the subsequent frames are 11:49 a.m., 1:35 p.m., 2:35 p.m. and 4:39 p.m.

In this color-coded map, quicker reddening during the day suggests sand or dust. (Red is about 270 Kelvin or 27 degrees Fahrenheit.) An example of this is in the shallow depression in the right foreground. Areas that stay blue longer into the day have larger rocks. (Blue indicates about 230 Kelvin or minus 45 Degrees F.) An example is the rock in the left foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
Browse Image | Medium Image (1.5 MB) | Large (9.9 MB)
 
Temperature Map, 'Bonneville Crater' (10:15 a.m.)
Temperature Map, "Bonneville Crater" (10:15 a.m.)

Rates of change in surface temperatures during a martian day indicate differences in particle size in and near "Bonneville Crater." This image is the first in a series of five with color-coded temperature information from different times of day. This one is from 10:15 a.m. local solar time at the site where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is exploring Mars. Temperature information from Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer is overlaid onto a view of the site from Spirit's panoramic camera.

In this color-coded map, quicker reddening during the day suggests sand or dust. (Red is about 270 Kelvin or 27 degrees Fahrenheit.) An example of this is in the shallow depression in the right foreground. Areas that stay blue longer into the day have larger rocks. (Blue indicates about 230 Kelvin or minus 45 Degrees F.) An example is the rock in the left foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
Browse Image | Medium Image (310 kB) | Large (2 MB)
 
Temperature Map, 'Bonneville Crater' (11:49 a.m.)
Temperature Map, "Bonneville Crater" (11:49 a.m.)

Rates of change in surface temperatures during a martian day indicate differences in particle size in and near "Bonneville Crater." This image is the second in a series of five with color-coded temperature information from different times of day. This one is from 11:49 a.m. local solar time at the site where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is exploring Mars. Temperature information from Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer is overlaid onto a view of the site from Spirit's panoramic camera.

In this color-coded map, quicker reddening during the day suggests sand or dust. (Red is about 270 Kelvin or 27 degrees Fahrenheit.) An example of this is in the shallow depression in the right foreground. Areas that stay blue longer into the day have larger rocks. (Blue indicates about 230 Kelvin or minus 45 Degrees F.) An example is the rock in the left foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
Browse Image | Medium Image (311 kB) | Large (2 MB)
 
Temperature Map, 'Bonneville Crater' (1:35 p.m.)
Temperature Map, "Bonneville Crater" (1:35 p.m.)

Rates of change in surface temperatures during a martian day indicate differences in particle size in and near "Bonneville Crater." This image is the third in a series of five with color-coded temperature information from different times of day. This one is from 1:35 p.m. local solar time at the site where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is exploring Mars. Temperature information from Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer is overlaid onto a view of the site from Spirit's panoramic camera.

In this color-coded map, quicker reddening during the day suggests sand or dust. (Red is about 270 Kelvin or 27 degrees Fahrenheit.) An example of this is in the shallow depression in the right foreground. Areas that stay blue longer into the day have larger rocks. (Blue indicates about 230 Kelvin or minus 45 Degrees F.) An example is the rock in the left foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
Browse Image | Medium Image (308 kB) | Large (2 MB)
 
Temperature Map, 'Bonneville Crater' (2:35 p.m.)
Temperature Map, "Bonneville Crater" (2:35 p.m.)

Rates of change in surface temperatures during a martian day indicate differences in particle size in and near "Bonneville Crater." This image is the fourth in a series of five with color-coded temperature information from different times of day. This one is from 2:35 p.m. local solar time at the site where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is exploring Mars. Temperature information from Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer is overlaid onto a view of the site from Spirit's panoramic camera.

In this color-coded map, quicker reddening during the day suggests sand or dust. (Red is about 270 Kelvin or 27 degrees Fahrenheit.) An example of this is in the shallow depression in the right foreground. Areas that stay blue longer into the day have larger rocks. (Blue indicates about 230 Kelvin or minus 45 Degrees F.) An example is the rock in the left foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
Browse Image | Medium Image (314 kB) | Large (2 MB)
 
Temperature Map, 'Bonneville Crater' (4:39 p.m.)
Temperature Map, "Bonneville Crater" (4:39 p.m.)

Rates of change in surface temperatures during a martian day indicate differences in particle size in and near "Bonneville Crater." This image is the fifth in a series of five with color-coded temperature information from different times of day. This one is from 4:39 p.m. local solar time at the site where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is exploring Mars. Temperature information from Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer is overlaid onto a view of the site from Spirit's panoramic camera.

In this color-coded map, quicker reddening during the day suggests sand or dust. (Red is about 270 Kelvin or 27 degrees Fahrenheit.) An example of this is in the shallow depression in the right foreground. Areas that stay blue longer into the day have larger rocks. (Blue indicates about 230 Kelvin or minus 45 Degrees F.) An example is the rock in the left foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/ASU
Browse Image | Medium Image (295 kB) | Large (2 MB)

JPL Image Use Policy

USA.gov
PRIVACY    |     FAQ    |     SITEMAP    |     CREDITS