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Press Release Images: Spirit
07-Oct-2004
Mars Rovers Probing Water History at Two Sites
Full Press Release
Hole in 'Ebenezer'
Hole in 'Ebenezer'

This image, taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, shows the mark left by the rover's rock abrasion tool on the rock dubbed "Ebenezer," located in Gusev Crater at the "Columbia Hills." Scientists investigated the rock with the abrasion tool and determined its chemistry using the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer instrument. Both instruments are located on the rover's robotic arm. Spirit took this image on its 236th martian day, or sol (Sept. 1, 2004). This is a true-color image generated from a composite of left-eye camera filters (750 to 430 nanometers).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Composition of 'Ebenezer' and 'Clovis'
Composition of 'Ebenezer' and 'Clovis'

Data on this graph from the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer instrument on the robotic arm of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit reveal the elemental chemistry of two rocks, "Ebenezer" and "Clovis," in the "Columbia Hills." Scientists found, through comparison of the rocks' chemistry, that Ebenezer and Clovis have very different compositions from the rocks on the Gusev plains.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills'
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills'

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit looked up at the "Columbia Hills" from its location on the 265th martian day, or sol, of its mission (Sept. 30, 2004) and captured this view. This cropped mosaic image, presented here in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction, was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (38 kB) | Medium Image (221 kB) | Large (2.5 MB)
'Tetl' Rock
'Tetl' Rock

This image, taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's trek through the "Columbia Hills" at "Gusev Crater," shows the horizontally layered rock dubbed "Tetl." Scientists hope to investigate this rock in more detail, aiming to determine whether the rock's layering is volcanic or sedimentary in origin. If for some reason this particular rock is not favorably positioned for grinding and examination by the toolbox of instruments on the rover's robotic arm, Spirit will be within short reach of another similar rock, dubbed "Coba." Spirit took this image on its 264th martian day, or sol (Sept. 29, 2004). This is a false-color composite image generated from the panoramic camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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'Cahokia' Panorama
'Cahokia' Panorama

This stunning image mosaic of the "Columbia Hills" is the first 360-degree panorama taken since the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit arrived at the hills over a month ago. The rover has been busy studying the rocks here, which show evidence of past alteration by water. The dark patch of soil to the right is the spot where Spirit stopped for engineering work on its right front wheel. Spirit's tracks can be followed from there all the way back to "Bonneville Crater" and the original landing site, more than 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) away.

This approximate true-color image, nicknamed the "Cahokia panorama" after the Native American archaeological site near St. Louis, was acquired between sols 213 to 223 (Aug. 9 to 19, 2004). The panorama consists of 470 images acquired through six panoramic camera filters (750 to 480 nanometers). It took until the week of sol 237 (Sept. 2) to downlink all the data back to Earth. Several more weeks of image processing and geometric mapping by team members at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., and Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., were required to stitch all the images together into this spectacular mosaic.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
Browse Image (52 kB) | Medium Image (274 kB) | Large (50.1 MB)
 
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (3-D)
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (3-D)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit looked up at the "Columbia Hills" from its location on the 265th martian day, or sol, of its mission (Sept. 30, 2004) and captured this 3-D view. This cropped mosaic image, presented here in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction, was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (25.5 kB) | Medium Image (210 kB) | Large (8 MB)
 
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (left eye)
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (left eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit looked up at the "Columbia Hills" from its location on the 265th martian day, or sol, of its mission (Sept. 30, 2004) and captured this view. This cropped mosaic image, presented here in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction, was taken by the rover's navigation camera. It is the left-eye half of a stereo pair.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (27 kB) | Medium Image (212 kB) | Large (4.1 MB)
 
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (right eye)
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (right eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit looked up at the "Columbia Hills" from its location on the 265th martian day, or sol, of its mission (Sept. 30, 2004) and captured this view. This cropped mosaic image, presented here in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction, was taken by the rover's navigation camera. It is the right-eye half of a stereo pair.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (26 kB) | Medium Image (207 kB) | Large (4 MB)
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (polar)
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (polar)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit looked up at the "Columbia Hills" from its location on the 265th martian day, or sol, of its mission (Sept. 30, 2004) and captured this view. This cropped mosaic image, presented here in a polar projection with geometric seam correction, was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (32.7 kB) | Medium Image (107 kB) | Large (3.5 kB)
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (vertical)
Spirit's View of 'Columbia Hills' (vertical)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit looked up at the "Columbia Hills" from its location on the 265th martian day, or sol, of its mission (Sept. 30, 2004) and captured this view. This cropped mosaic image, presented here in a vertical projection with geometric seam correction, was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (44 kB) | Medium Image (147 kB) | Large (4.3 kB)

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