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This sequence of images shows a blast zone where the sky crane from NASA's Curiosity rover mission hit the ground after setting the rover down in August 2012, and how that dark scar's appearance changed over the subsequent 30 months. The images are from HiRISE on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Changes in Scars: Figure C - Heat Shield
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This sequence of images shows a blast zone where the sky crane from NASA's Curiosity rover mission hit the ground after setting the rover down in August 2012, and how that dark scar's appearance changed over the subsequent 30 months. The images are from HiRISE on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Changes in Scars: Figure B - Curiosity Rover
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This sequence of images shows a blast zone where the sky crane from NASA's Curiosity rover mission hit the ground after setting the rover down in August 2012, and how that dark scar's appearance changed over the subsequent 30 months. The images are from HiRISE on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Changes in Scars: Figure A - Backshell
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This sequence of images shows a blast zone where the sky crane from NASA's Curiosity rover mission hit the ground after setting the rover down in August 2012, and how that dark scar's appearance changed over the subsequent 30 months. The images are from HiRISE on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Changes in Scars From 2012 Mars Landing
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This illustration depicts some highlights along the route as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drove as far as a marathon race during the first 11 years and two months after its January 2004 landing in Eagle Crater
Opportunity's Marathon Journey
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Eleven years and two months after its landing on Mars, the total driving distance of NASA's Opportunity Mars rover surpassed the length of a marathon race: 26.219 miles (42.195 kilometers). This map shows the rover's path from late December 2014 until it passed marathon distance on March 24, 2015.
Opportunity Rover Surpasses Marathon Distance
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Cumulative driving by NASA's Opportunity Mars rover surpassed marathon distance on March 24, 2015, as the rover neared a destination called "Marathon Valley," which is middle ground of this stereo view from early March. The scene appears three-dimensional when viewed through blue-red glasses.
Opportunity's Approach to 'Marathon Valley' (Stereo)
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Cumulative driving by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity surpassed marathon distance on March 24, 2015, as the rover neared a destination called "Marathon Valley," which is middle ground of this dramatic view from early March.
Opportunity's Approach to 'Marathon Valley'
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NASA's Opportunity Mars rover, working on Mars since January 2004, passed marathon distance in total driving on March 24, 2015. This map shows the rover's entire traverse from landing to that point.
Opportunity Rover's Full Marathon-Length Traverse
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This map updates progress that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is making toward reaching a driving distance equivalent to a marathon footrace. It indicates the rover's position on March 23, 2015, relative to where it could surpass that distance.
Rover's Progress Toward Mars Marathon, Sol 3966
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This stereo scene from NASA's Opportunity Mars rover shows part of "Marathon Valley" as seen from an overlook north of the valley on March 13, 2015. The image combines views from the left eye and right eye of Opportunity's Pancam to appear three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses
Mars 'Marathon Valley' Overlook, in Stereo
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This view from NASA's Opportunity Mars rover shows part of "Marathon Valley" as seen from an overlook north of the valley. It was taken by the rover's Pancam on March 13, 2015. This version is presented in false color to make differences in surface materials more easily visible.
Mars 'Marathon Valley' Overlook (False Color)
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This view from NASA's Opportunity Mars rover shows part of "Marathon Valley," a destination on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, as seen from an overlook north of the valley. It was taken by the rover's Pancam on March 13, 2015. This version is in approximate true color.
Mars 'Marathon Valley' Overlook
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A map of MAVEN's IUVS's auroral detections in December 2014 overlaid on Mars' surface.
Map of Auroral Detections on Mars
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Artist's conception of MAVEN's Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS) observing the "Christmas Lights Aurora" on Mars. MAVEN observations show that aurora on Mars is similar to Earth's "Northern Lights" but has a different origin.
Artist's Concept of MAVEN Observing Aurora on Mars
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Take JPL Education's Pi Day challenge featuring real-world questions about NASA spacecraft -- then tweet your answers to @NASAJPL_Edu using the hashtag #PiDay. Answers will be revealed on March 16.
Pi in the Sky 2
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This area at the base of Mount Sharp on Mars includes a pale outcrop, called "Pahrump Hills," that NASA's Curiosity Mars rover investigated from September 2014 to March 2015, and the "Artist's Drive" route toward higher layers of the mountain.
Curiosity's Arm Holding Steady, Sol 915
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This March 4, 2015, image from the Navcam on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows the position in which the rover held its arm for several days after a transient short circuit triggered onboard fault-protection programming to halt arm activities on Feb. 27.
Curiosity's Arm Holding Steady, Sol 915
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This map updates progress that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is making toward reaching a driving distance equivalent to a marathon footrace. It indicates the rover position on March 5, 2015, relative to where it could surpass that distance.
Rover's Progress Toward Mars Marathon, Sol 3948
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The flat-faced rock near the center of this image is a target for contact investigation by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in early March 2015.
Blocky Rock is Exam Target for Mars Rover Opportunity
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This image shows testing of InSight's robotic arm at JPL about two years before it will perform these tasks on Mars.
Testing for Instrument Deployment by InSight's Arm
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This map shows the single area under continuing evaluation as the InSight mission's Mars landing site, as of a year before the mission's May 2016 launch. The finalist ellipse marked is within the northern portion of flat-lying Elysium Planitia about four degrees north of Mars' equator.
Finalist Site for Next Landing on Mars
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This raw-color view from Curiosity's Mastcam shows the rover's drill just after finishing a drilling operation at "Telegraph Peak" on Feb. 24, 2015. Three days later, a fault-protection action by the rover halted a process of transferring sample powder that was collected during this drilling.
Curiosity's Drill After Drilling at 'Telegraph Peak'
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This hole, with a diameter slightly smaller than a U.S. dime, was drilled by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover into a rock target called "Telegraph Peak." The rock is located within the basal layer of Mount Sharp. The hole was drilled on Feb. 24, 2015.
Hole at 'Telegraph Peak' on Mars Drilled by Curiosity
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This self-portrait of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows the vehicle at the 'Mojave' site, where its drill collected the mission's second taste of Mount Sharp. The scene combines dozens of images taken during January 2015 by the MAHLI camera at the end of the rover's robotic arm.
Curiosity Self-Portrait at 'Mojave' on Mount Sharp
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