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3-D Images: Opportunity
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02-Dec-2004
 
 
No Shortcut for Opportunity (3-D)
No Shortcut for Opportunity (3-D)

As NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was making its way back toward its original entry path into "Endurance Crater," scientists and engineers spotted what they hoped might be a shortcut for climbing out of the crater. The possible exit path, pictured on the far right of this image where the outcrop is punctuated, was eventually deemed too hazardous for the rover to attempt. Opportunity would have had to cross terrain with a slope of 28 degrees and face a tall rock outcropping very close to the exit chute opening which, itself, is too narrow for the rover to pass. This stereo view combines several frames taken by the rover's navigation camera during Opportunity's 297th sol on Mars (Nov. 24, 2004). It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The location from which the image was taken has been designated as Opportunity's Site 38, Position 97.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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22-Nov-2004
 
 
Opportunity at the Wall (3-D)
Opportunity at the Wall (3-D)

The navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity took images during the rover's 285th martian day (Nov. 11, 2004) that are combined into this stereo panorama. Opportunity had reached the base of "Burns Cliff," a portion of the inner wall of "Endurance Crater." This view shows rock layers in the wall, with a portion of Opportunity's solar array visible at the bottom right.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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15-Nov-2004
 
 
Along Crater's Inner Wall (3-D)
Along Crater's Inner Wall (3-D)

This stereo view from the base of "Burns Cliff" in the inner wall of "Endurance Crater" combines several frames taken by Opportunity's navigation camera during the NASA rover's 280th martian day (Nov. 6, 2004). It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The cliff dominates the left and right portions of the image, while the central portion looks down into the crater. The "U" shape of this mosaic results from the rover's tilt of about 30 degrees on the sloped ground below the cliff. Rover wheel tracks in the left half of the image show some of the slippage the rover experienced in making its way to this point. The site from which this image was taken has been designated as Opportunity's Site 37.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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18-Oct-2004
 
Wonderful Wopmay
Wonderful Wopmay

This three-dimensional view from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows an unusual, lumpy rock informally named "Wopmay" on the lower slopes of "Endurance Crater." Opportunity took the frames that make up this image on the rover's 250th martian day, or sol, on Oct. 6, 2004. Later, Opportunity investigated the rock with instruments on its robotic arm.

The rock's informal name refers to Wilfrid Reid "Wop" May, a Canadian bush pilot. Scientists believe that the lumps in Wopmay, like traits of "Escher" and other rocks dotting the bottom of Endurance Crater, may be related to cracking and alteration processes, possibly caused by exposure to water. The area between intersecting sets of cracks appears to have eroded in a way that shaped the lumpy appearance. Wopmay measures approximately 1 meter (3.3 feet) across.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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16-Sept-2004
 
 
'Endurance' Untouched (3-D)
'Endurance' Untouched (3-D)

This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of "Endurance Crater." The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through the martian atmosphere. The 360-degree, stereo view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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18-Aug-2004
 
'Diamond' in 3-D
'Diamond' in 3-D

This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called "Diamond Jenness" was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of "Endurance Crater." On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

On Sol 178, Opportunity's "robotic rodent" dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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21-Jul-2004
 
 
Opportunity's View on Sol 171 (3-D)
'Endurance' All Around (3-D)

This 360-degree stereo anaglyph of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was taken on the rover's 171st sol on Mars (July 17, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as "site 33." Opportunity had driven 11 meters (36 feet) into "Endurance Crater." The view is a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometrical seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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10-Jun-2004
 
 
Ready to Enter 'Endurance'(Stereo)

This stereo anaglyph looking toward the northeast across "Endurance Crater" in Mars' Meridiani Planum region was assembled from frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 131st martian day, or sol, on June 6, 2004. That was two sols before Opportunity entered the crater, taking the route nearly straight ahead in this image into the "Karatepe" area of the crater. This view is a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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24-May-2004
 
 
Near 'Endurance' on Sol 115 (3-D)
Near 'Endurance' on Sol 115 (3-D)

This three-dimensional stereo anaglyph was created from several frames from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection. The rover acquired these frames during its 115th martian day, or "sol," in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars, on May 21, 2004. The rover was near the edge of "Endurance Crater," which dominates the right half of this view. The crater is about 130 meters (about 430 feet) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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18-May-2004
 
 
Looking at 'Endurance' on Sol 108 (3-D)
Looking at 'Endurance' on Sol 108 (3-D)

This three-dimensional anaglyph stereo view was created from navigation camera frames that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired at about 4:05 p.m., local solar time on Mars, on sol 108, May 13, 2004. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection. Opportunity is sitting along the rim of "Endurance Crater." NASA has not yet determined whether Opportunity will venture inside the crater, which is about 130 meters (about 430 feet) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Opportunity View on Sol 109 (3-D)
Opportunity View on Sol 109 (3-D)

This three-dimensional anaglyph stereo view was assembled from navigation camera frames that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired on sol 109, May 15, 2004. It is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection. Opportunity is sitting along the rim of "Endurance Crater" in the Meridiani Planum region.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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12-May-2004
 
 
Riding the Rim of 'Endurance' (3-D)
Riding the Rim of 'Endurance' (3-D)

This three-dimensional view in the cylindrical-perspective projection was created from navigation camera images that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired on sol 103 (May 8, 2004). Opportunity traversed approximately 13 meters (about 43 feet) farther south along the eastern rim of "Endurance Crater" before reaching the beginning of the "Karatepe" area. Scientists believe this layered band of rock may be a good place to begin studying Endurance because it is less steep and more approachable than the rest of the crater's rocky outcrops.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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03-May-2004
 
 
Behold 'Endurance'! (3-D)
Behold 'Endurance'! (3-D)

This three-dimensional, 180-degree view from the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is the first look inside "Endurance Crater." The view is a cylindrical-perspective projection constructed from four images. The crater is about 130 meters (about 430 feet) in diameter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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30-Apr-2004
 
 
Almost There! (3-D)
Almost There! (3-D)

This three-dimensional, cylindrical-perspective projection was constructed from images taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The images were acquired on sol 94 (April 29, 2004) of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum. The camera acquired the images at approximately 12:40 local solar time, or around 9:15 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time. The images were taken from the rover's new location about 20 meters (65 feet) away from the rim of Opportunity's next target, "Endurance Crater."

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Approaching 'Endurance'(3-D)
Approaching 'Endurance'(3-D)

This three-dimensional, cylindrical-perspective projection was constructed from images taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's navigation camera on the rover's 93rd sol on Mars. The camera acquired the images at approximately 12:27 Local Solar Time, or around 8:22 AM Pacific Daylight Time on April 28, 2004. On that sol, Opportunity sat about 75 meters (246 feet) away from the rim of "Endurance Crater."

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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21-Apr-2004
 
 
One View, Two Craters (3-D)
One View, Two Craters (3-D)

This 3-D cylindrical-perspective projection was constructed from a sequence of four images taken by the navigation camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity.

The images were acquired on sol 85 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum. The camera acquired the images at approximately 14:28 local solar time, or around 6:30 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time, on April 20, 2004.

The view is from the rover's new location, a region dubbed "Fram Crater" located some 450 meters (.3 miles) from "Eagle Crater" and roughly 250 meters (820 feet) from "Endurance Crater" (upper right).

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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02-Apr-2004
 
A Crack Runs Through It
A Crack Runs Through It

This 3-D image taken by the microscopic imager on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a close-up of the center of the rock abrasion tool hole, ground into “Bounce” on the rover’s 66th sol on Mars. Features smaller than one-tenth of a millimeter (.004 inches) are visible. The observed area is a little over 3 centimeters (1.2 inches). The canyon-like crack that runs across the bottom half of the image is really only about 2 millimeters (about 0.08 inches) deep. Scientists are currently using a variety of instruments to study the chemical content of the rock.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS
Browse Image (92 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
25-Mar-2004
 
 
A Well-Traveled 'Eagle Crater'
A Well-Traveled 'Eagle Crater'

This is the 3-D version of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's view on its 56th sol on Mars, before it left "Eagle Crater." To the right, the rover tracks are visible at the original spot where the rover attempted unsuccessfully to exit the crater. After a one-sol delay, Opportunity took another route to the plains of Meridiani Planum. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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23-Mar-2004
 
 
Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater' (3-D)
Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater' (3-D)

This is a 3-D version of the first 360-degree view from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's new position outside "Eagle Crater," the small crater where the rover landed about two months ago. Scientists are busy analyzing Opportunity's new view of the plains of Meridiani Planum. The plentiful ripples are a clear indication that wind is the primary geologic process currently in effect on the plains. The rover's tracks can be seen leading away from Eagle Crater. At the far left are two depressions - each about a meter (about 3.3 feet) across - that feature bright spots in their centers. One possibility is that the bright material is similar in composition to the rocks in Eagle Crater's outcrop and the surrounding darker material is what's referred to as "lag deposit," or erosional remnants, which are much harder and more difficult to wear away. These twin dimples might be revealing pieces of a larger outcrop that lies beneath. The depression closest to Opportunity is whimsically referred to as "Homeplate" and the one behind it as "First Base." The rover's panoramic camera is set to take detailed images of the depressions today, on Opportunity's 58th sol. The backshell and parachute that helped protect the rover and deliver it safely to the surface of Mars are also visible near the horizon, at the left of the image. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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12-Feb-2004
 
'Berries' on the Ground 2 (3-D)
"Berries" on the Ground 2 (3-D)

This is the 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of soil featuring round, blueberry-shaped rock formations on the crater floor at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken on the 13th day of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's journey, before the Mössbauer spectrometer, an instrument located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or "arm," was pressed down to take measurements. The area in this image is approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS/Texas A&M
Browse Image (60 kB) | Large (882 kB)
'Berries' on the Ground 2 (3-D)
"Berries" on the Ground 2 (3-D)

This is the 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of soil featuring round, blueberry-shaped rock formations on the crater floor at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken on the 13th day of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's journey, after the Mössbauer spectrometer, an instrument located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or "arm," was pressed down to measure the soil's iron mineralogy. Note the donut-shaped imprint of the instrument in the lower part of the image. The area in this image is approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS/Texas A&M
Browse Image (106 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
06-Feb-2004
 
Traversing Martian Terrain
Traversing Martian Terrain

This 3-D view from behind the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the path the rover has traveled since rolling 1 meter (3 feet) away from its now-empty lander on the seventh martian day, or sol, of its mission. On the 12th sol, Opportunity drove another 3 1/2 meters (11 feet), and then, one sol later, another 1 1/2 meters (5 feet). On its way, the rover twisted and turned in a test of its driving capabilities. Opportunity is headed toward the eastern edge of the rock outcropping along the inner wall of the crater where it landed. This image was taken by the rover's rear hazard-avoidance camera.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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02-Feb-2004
 
Opportunity Stretches Out (3-D)
Opportunity Stretches Out (3-D)

This is a three-dimensional stereo anaglyph of an image taken by the front hazard-avoidance camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, showing the rover's arm in its extended position. The arm, or instrument deployment device, was deployed on the ninth martian day, or sol, of the mission. The rover, now sitting 1 meter (3 feet) away from the lander, can be seen in the foreground.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image (42 kB) | Large (578 kB)
31-Jan-2004
 
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Vacant Lander in 3-D

This 3-D image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rear hazard-avoidance camera shows the now-empty lander that carried the rover 283 million miles to Meridiani Planum, Mars. Engineers received confirmation that Opportunity's six wheels successfully rolled off the lander and onto martian soil at 3:01 a.m. PST, January 31, 2004, on the seventh martian day, or sol, of the mission. The rover is approximately 1 meter (3 feet) in front of the lander, facing north.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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27-Jan-2004
 
 
Not of this Earth (3-D)
Not of this Earth (3-D)

This sweeping 3-D look at the unusual rock outcropping near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was captured by the rover's panoramic camera. Scientists believe the layered rocks are either volcanic ash deposits, or sediments laid down by wind or water. Opportunity landed at Meridiani Planum, Mars on January 24 at 9:05 p.m. PST.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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