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3-D Images: Opportunity
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15-Nov-2006
 
 
Opportunity's View, Sol 959, (Stereo)
Opportunity's View, Sol 959, (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo view of the rover's surroundings on the 959th sol, or Martian day, of its surface mission (Oct. 5, 2006).

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Hi-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
14-Nov-2006
 
 
Stereo view of rover's surroundings
Opportunity's View, Sol 958 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo view of the rover's surroundings on the 958th sol, or Martian day, of its surface mission (Oct. 4, 2006).

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The image appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-green stereo glasses.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Hi-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
06-Oct-2006
 
 
Layers of 'Cabo Frio' in 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)
Layers of 'Cabo Frio' in 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)

This view of "Victoria crater" is looking southeast from "Duck Bay" towards the dramatic promontory called "Cabo Frio." The small crater in the right foreground, informally known as "Sputnik", is about 20 meters (about 65 feet) away from the rover, the tip of the spectacular, layered, Cabo Frio promontory itself is about 200 meters (about 650 feet) away from the rover, and the exposed rock layers are about 15 meters (about 50 feet) tall. This is a red-blue stereo anaglyph generated from images taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 952nd sol, or Martian day, (Sept. 28, 2006) using the camera's 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Layers of 'Cape Verde' in 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)
Layers of 'Cape Verde' in 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)

This view of Victoria crater is looking north from "Duck Bay" towards the dramatic promontory called "Cape Verde." The dramatic cliff of layered rocks is about 50 meters (about 165 feet) away from the rover and is about 6 meters (about 20 feet) tall. The taller promontory beyond that is about 100 meters (about 325 feet) away, and the vista beyond that extends away for more than 400 meters (about 1300 feet) into the distance. This is a red-blue stereo anaglyph generated from images taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 952nd sol, or Martian day, (Sept. 28, 2006) using the camera's 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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28-Sep-2006
 
 
'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Stereo)
'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Stereo)

NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the "Duck Bay" alcove along the rim of "Victoria Crater" during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the exposures combined into this stereo anaglyph view of the crater's interior, which appears three dimensional when viewed through red-green glasses. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named "Cape Verde," on the left, and "Cabo Frio," on the right.

Victoria Crater is about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past enviromnental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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27-Sep-2006
 
 
This image is a 3d image of Opportunity's view on the rim of 'Victoria Crater'
On the Rim of 'Victoria Crater'(Stereo)

NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reached the rim of "Victoria Crater" in Mars' Meridiani Planum region with a 26-meter (85-foot) drive during the rover's 951st Martian day, or sol (Sept. 26, 2006). After the drive, the rover's navigation camera took the exposures combined into this stereo anaglyph view of the crater's interior, which appears three dimensional when viewed through red-green glasses. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

A half mile in the distance one can see about 20 percent of the far side of the crater framed by the rocky cliffs in the foreground to the left and right of the image. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind.

The position at the end of the sol 951 drive is about six meters from the lip of an alcove called "Duck Bay." The rover team planned a drive for sol 952 that would move a few more meters forward, plus more imaging of the near and far walls of the crater.

Victoria Crater is about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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This image, 3d image was taken by Opportunity within about 20 meters, or 66 feet, of the rim of 'Victoria Crater'
'Victoria' After Sol 950 Drive (Stereo)

A drive of about 30 meters (about 100 feet) on the 950th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's exploration of Mars' Meridiani Planum region (Sept. 25, 2006) brought the NASA rover to within about 20 meters (about 66 feet) of the rim of "Victoria Crater." From that position, the rover's navigation camera took the exposures combined into this stereo anaglyph, which appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-green glasses. The scalloped shape of the crater is visible on the left edge. Due to a small dune or ripple close to the nearest part of the rim, the scientists and engineers on the rover team planned on sol 951 to drive to the right of the ripple, but not quite all the way to the rim, then to proceed to the rim the following sol. The image is presented in cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Victoria Crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) in diameter, about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is the expectation that a thick stack of geological layers will be exposed in the crater walls, potentially several times the thickness that was previously studied at Endurance and therefore, potentially preserving several times the historical record.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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22-Sep-2006
 
 
This image is a stero Pancam Peek into 'Victoria Crater'
Pancam Peek into 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)

A drive of about 60 meters (about 200 feet) on the 943rd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's exploration of Mars' Meridiani Planum region (Sept. 18, 2006) brought the NASA rover to within about 50 meters (about 160 feet) of the rim of "Victoria Crater." This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months. Opportunity reached a location from which the cameras on top of the rover's mast could begin to see into the interior of Victoria. This stereo anaglyph was made from frames taken on sol 943 by the panoramic camera (Pancam) to offer a three-dimensional view when seen through red-blue glasses. It shows the upper portion of interior crater walls facing toward Opportunity from up to about 850 meters (half a mile) away. The amount of vertical relief visible at the top of the interior walls from this angle is about 15 meters (about 50 feet). The exposures were taken through a Pancam filter selecting wavelengths centered on 750 nanometers.

Victoria Crater is about five times wider than "Endurance Crater," which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than "Eagle Crater," where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is the expectation that a thick stack of geological layers will be exposed in the crater walls, potentially several times the thickness that was previously studied at Endurance and therefore, potentially preserving several times the historical record.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
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10-Jul-2006
 
 
This panoramic image shows a captured a sweeping image of 'Burns Cliff'
'Burns Cliff' in Color Stereo

The panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured a sweeping image of "Burns Cliff" after driving right to the base of this southeastern portion of the inner wall of "Endurance Crater" in November 2004. This view is a color stereo anaglyph, offering a three-dimensionsal quality when seen properly through red/blue glasses. It incorporates imagery released previously (PIA07110). The image combines frames taken between the rover's 287th and 294th Martian days (Nov. 13 to 20, 2004). It spans about 180 degrees from side to side. Because of this wide-angle view, the cliff walls appear to bulge out toward the camera. In reality the walls form a gently curving, continuous surface.

Image credit: NSA/JPL/Cornell
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25-Jan-2006
 
 
This panorama image shows the landscape surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at the edge of 'Erebus Crater'
Erebus Panorama in Stereo

This stereo view shows the landscape surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at the edge of "Erebus Crater" while the rover's panoramic camera captured frames for a full-circle panorama on Opportunity's sols 652 to 663 (Nov. 23 to Dec. 5, 2005 ). The scene includes finely-layered outcrop rocks, wind ripples, and small cobbles and grains along the rim of the wide but shallow crater. The full panorama, including more of the rover deck than shown here, is at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03270.

This image appears three dimensional when viewed through red and blue glasses with a red left eye and blue right eye. Both the left and right images were taken through blue filters. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
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