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3-D Images: Opportunity
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06-Aug-2009
 
'Block Island' Meteorite on Mars, Sol 1961 (Stereo)

Composition measurements by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity confirm that this rock on the Martian surface is an iron-nickel meteorite.

This image combines exposures from the left eye and right eye of the rover's panoramic camera to provide a three-dimensional view when seen through red-green glasses with the red lens on the left. The camera took the component images during the 1,961st Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (July 31), after approaching close enough to touch the rock with tools on the rover's robotic arm.

Researchers have informally named the rock "Block Island." With a width of about two-thirds of a meter (2 feet), it is the largest meteorite yet found on Mars. Opportunity found a smaller iron-nickel meteorite, called "Heat Shield Rock" in late 2004.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University
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23-Jul-2009
 
 
Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1950 (Stereo)
Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1950 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,950th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (July 19, 2009). The view appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left. South is in the middle; north at both ends.

Opportunity had driven 60.8 meters (199 feet) that sol, moving backward as a strategy to mitigate an increased amount of current drawn by the drive motor in the right-front wheel. The rover was traveling a westward course, skirting a large field of impassable dunes to the south.

Much of the terrain surrounding the Sol 1950 position is wind-formed ripples of dark soil, with pale outcrop exposed in troughs between some ripples. A small crater visible nearby to the northwest is informally called "Kaiko." For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

The site is about 3.8 kilometers (2.4 miles) south-southwest of Victoria Crater.

This panorama combines right-eye and left-eye views presented as cylindrical-perspective projections with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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15-Jul-2009
 
 
Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850 (Stereo)
Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,850th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (April 7, 2009). The view appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

Opportunity had driven 62.5 meters (205 feet) that sol, southward away from an outcrop called "Penrhyn," which the rover had been examining for a few sols, and toward a crater called "Adventure." In preceding drives, the drive motor for the right-front wheel had been drawing more current than usual, so engineers drove Opportunuity backward on Sol 1950, a strategy to redistribute lubricant and reduce friction in the wheel.

North is in the center of the image; south at both ends. Opportunity's position on Sol 1850 was about 1.3 kilometers (0.8 mile) south-southwest of Victoria Crater. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This panorama combines right-eye and left-eye views presented as cylindrical-perspective projections with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Opportunity's View After 72-Meter Drive, Sol 1912 (Stereo)
Opportunity's View After 72-Meter Drive, Sol 1912 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,912th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (June 10, 2009). The view appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

Opportunity had driven 72.3 meters southward (237 feet) that sol. Engineers drove the rover backward as a strategy to counteract an increase in the amount of current drawn by the drive motor of the right-front wheel.

North is in the center of the image; south at both ends. Opportunity's position on Sol 1912 was about 2.5 kilometers (1.6 mile) south-southwest of Victoria Crater. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This panorama combines right-eye and left-eye views presented as cylindrical-perspective projections with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Full Resolution (48.5 MB)
23-Mar-2009
 
 
Opportunity at 'Cook Islands' (Stereo)
Opportunity at 'Cook Islands' (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,825th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 12, 2009). North is at the center, and south is at both ends.

This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

The rover had driven half a meter (1.5 feet) earlier on Sol 1825 to fine-tune its location for placing its robotic arm onto an exposed patch of outcrop including a target area informally called "Cook Islands." On the preceding sol, Opportunity turned around to drive frontwards and then drove 4.5 meters (15 feet) toward this outcrop. The tracks from the SOl 1824 drive are visible in the center foreground of this view. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). Opportunity had previously been driving backward as a strategy to redistribute lubrication in a wheel drawing more electrical current than usual.

The outcrop exposure that includes "Cook Islands" is in the lower right and left corners of the image. In the upper right, southeast from the rover's position, is a very small crater called "Resolution."

The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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20-Mar-2009
 
 
Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1798 (Stereo)
Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1798 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,798th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 13, 2009). North is at the center, west on the left, east on the right.

This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

The rover had driven 111 meters (364 feet) southward on the preceding sol. Tracks from that drive recede northward in this view. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1818 (Stereo)
Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1818 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,818th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 5, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

The rover had driven 80.3 meters (263 feet) southward earlier on that sol. Tracks from the drive recede northward in this view.

The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive (Stereo)
Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward, toward a cluster of rocks at the rim of a small crater called "Resolution." For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Full Resolution (52.3 MB)
03-Mar-2009
 
 
Opportunity's View on Sols 1803 and 1804 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,803rd and 1,804th Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 18 and 19, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

The rover had driven 55 meters on Sol 1803 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede northward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (194 kB) | Large (1.1 MB)
Full Resolution (47.7 MB)
 
Opportunity's View After Drive on Sol 1806 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, full-circle view of the rover's surroundings just after driving 60.86 meters (200 feet) on the 1,806th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 21, 2009). North is at the center; south at both ends.

This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

Tracks from the drive extend northward across dark-toned sand ripples and light-toned patches of exposed bedrock in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

Engineers designed the Sol 1806 drive to be driven backwards as a strategy to redistribute lubricant in the rovers wheels. The right-front wheel had been showing signs of increased friction.

The rover's position after the Sol 1806 drive was about 2 kilometer (1.2 miles) south southwest of Victoria Crater. Cumulative odometry was 14.74 kilometers (9.16 miles) since landing in January 2004, including 2.96 kilometers (1.84 miles) since climbing out of Victoria Crater on the west side of the crater on Sol 1634 (August 28, 2008).

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Full Resolution (50.5 MB)
 
Wind-Sculpted Vicinity After Opportunity's Sol 1797 Drive (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, full-circle view of the rover's surroundings just after driving 111 meters (364 feet) on the 1,797th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 12, 2009). North is at the center; south at both ends.

This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

Tracks from the drive recede northward across dark-toned sand ripples in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. Patches of lighter-toned bedrock are visible on the left and right sides of the image. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Full Resolution (49.6 MB)
04-Feb-2009
 
 
Opportunity's View After Long Drive on Sol 1770 (Stereo)
Opportunity's View After Long Drive on Sol 1770 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, full-circle view of the rover's surroundings just after driving 104 meters (341 feet) on the 1,770th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (January 15, 2009). North is at the center; south at both ends.

This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

Tracks from the drive extend northward across dark-toned sand ripples and light-toned patches of exposed bedrock in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

Prior to the Sol 1770 drive, Opportunity had driven less than a meter since Sol 1713 (November 17, 2008), while it used the tools on its robotic arm first to examine a meteorite called "Santorini" during weeks of restricted communication while the sun was nearly in line between Mars and Earth, then to examine bedrock and soil targets near Santorini.

The rover's position after the Sol 1770 drive was about 1.1 kilometer (two-thirds of a mile) south southwest of Victoria Crater. Cumulative odometry was 13.72 kilometers (8.53 miles) since landing in January 2004, including 1.94 kilometers (1.21 miles) since climbing out of Victoria Crater on the west side of the crater on Sol 1634 (August 28, 2008).

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Full Resolution (50.7 MB)
03-Feb-2009
 
 
NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,506th through 1,510th Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (April 19-23, 2008). South is at the center; north is at both ends.
Opportunity View During Exploration in 'Duck Bay,' Sols 1506-1510 (Stereo)

NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, full-circle view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,506th through 1,510th Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (April 19-23, 2008). South is at the center; north is at both ends.

This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

The site is within an alcove called "Duck Bay" in the western portion of Victoria Crater. Victoria Crater is about 800 meters (half a mile) wide. Opportunity had descended into the crater at the top of Duck Bay 7 months earlier. By the time the rover acquired this view, it had examined rock layers inside the rim, visible above the rover's solar panels.

Opportunity was headed for a closer look at the base of a promontory called "Cape Verde," the cliff near the left edge of this image, before leaving Victoria. The face of Cape Verde is about 6 meters (20 feet) tall. Just to the right of Cape Verde is the main bowl of Victoria Crater, with sand dunes at the bottom. A promontory called "Cabo Frio," at the southern side of Duck Bay, stands near the center of the image.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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Full-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
22-Jan-2009
 
 
View from West of Victoria Crater, Sol 1664 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle, stereo view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,664th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (September 28, 2008). Opportunity had driven 152.8 meters (501 feet) southward on the preceding sol, reaching this location on the west side of Victoria Crater. View the maps of the traverse to this point.

This image combines views from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

Rover tracks from the Sol 1663 drive extend northward in the image. For scale, the two parallel tracks are about 1 meter (39 inches) apart. To the right of center, Victoria Crater is visible from the north-northeast to the east-southeast. The far right and left edges of the image are to the south.

Opportunity drove away from this location on Sol 1666 (September 30, 2008), with a drive of 129.9 meters (426 feet) further southward.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Full-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
09-Jan-2009
 
 
Full-Circle "Santorini" Panorama from Opportunity (False Color)

This 360-degree panorama shows the vista from the location where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity spent five weeks in November and December 2008 while the sun was nearly directly in between Mars and Earth, limiting communications.

This is a false-color, red-green-blue composite panorama generated from images taken through the Pancam's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters. The false color enhances visibility of differences among the types of rock and soil material in the image.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Full-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)

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