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This image shows a rectangle map of Mars that is color-coded for topography.  Blue represents low areas and red and white are the highest elevations.  The northern hemisphere is mostly blue and uncratered compared to the southern hemisphere which is heavily cratered and varies widely in elevation.  Text and dots represent six landing sites spread across Mars between 300 degrees West to 180 degrees East.  All of the landing  sites hover in the equatorial region within 25 degrees North and South, except Viking  2, which is higher, around 48 degrees North.
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Mars Landing Sites


Locations of landers and rovers on Mars.  VL1 is Viking Lander 1, a stationary robot from 1976.  MPF is Mars Pathfinder, a roving vehicle from 1997.  Opportunity/Meridiani Planum is the second of the Mars Exploration Rovers that landed and drove in 2004.  Isidis was the projected landing site for the European Space Agency's Beagle 2 stationary lander that was lost on arrival at Mars in 2003.  VL2 is Viking Lander 2 that landed in 1976.  Spirit/Gusev Crater is where Spirit landed and drove in 2004.

Credit: NASA/JPL/GSFC

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