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Panoramas: Opportunity
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05-Dec-2005
 
 
This panoramic image is view from the panoramic image from Opportunity shows an outcrop called 'Olympia' along the northwestern margin of 'Erebus' crater
Opportunity's 'Olympia' Panorama

This view from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows an outcrop called "Olympia" along the northwestern margin of "Erebus" crater. The view spans about 120 degrees from side to side, generally looking southward. The outcrop exposes a broad expanse of sulfate-rich sedimentary rocks. The rocks were formed predominantly from windblown sediments, but some also formed in environmental conditions from damp to under shallow surface water. After taking the images that were combined into this view, Opportunity drove along along a path between sand dunes to the upper left side of the image, where a cliff in the background can be seen. This is cliff is known as the "Mogollon Rim." Researchers expect it to expose more than 1 meter (3 feet) of new strata, These strata may represent the highest level observed yet by Opportunity. The image is an approximately true-color rendering generated using the panoramic camera's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell

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16-Sep-2005
 
 
This view is a mosaic produced from from frames taken by the rover's navigation camera during Opportunity's 582nd martian day, or sol (Sept. 13, 2005). It shows fractured blocks of ancient sedimentary rock separated by recent sand dunes.
Heading South on 'Erebus Highway'

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is currently traveling southward over a pavement of outcrop dubbed the "Erebus Highway." "Erebus Crater," the rover's next target, lies less than 100 meters (328 feet) south of its current position. This view is a mosaic produced from from frames taken by the rover's navigation camera during Opportunity's 582nd martian day, or sol (Sept. 13, 2005). It shows fractured blocks of ancient sedimentary rock separated by recent sand dunes. Mars Exploration Rover team scientists are investigating both the composition of the rocks and the processes by which the distinctive fracture pattern arose.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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28-July-2005
 
 
Panoramic image from the plains of Meridiani
Opportunity's 'Rub al Khali' Panorama

This panoramic image, dubbed "Rub al Khali," was acquired by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on the plains of Meridiani during the period from the rover's 456th to 464th sols on Mars (May 6 to May 14, 2005). Opportunity was about 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) south of "Endurance Crater" at a place known informally as "Purgatory Dune."

The rover was stuck in the dune's deep fine sand for more than a month. "Rub al Khali" (Arabic translation: "the empty quarter") was chosen as the name for this panorama because it is the name of a similarly barren, desolate part of the Saudi Arabian desert on Earth.

The view spans 360 degrees. It consists of images obtained in 97 individual pointings of the panoramic camera. The camera took images with five camera filters at each pointing. This 22,780-by-6,000-pixel mosaic is an approximately true-color rendering generated using the images acquired through filters admitting light wavelengths of 750, 530, and 480 nanometers.

Lighting varied during the nine sols it took to acquire this panorama, resulting in some small image seams within the mosaic. These seams have been smoothed in sky parts of the mosaic to better simulate the vista that a person would see if able to view it all at the same time on Mars.

Opportunity's tracks leading back to the north (center of the panorama) are a reminder of the rover's long trek from Endurance Crater. The deep ruts dug by Opportunity's wheels as it became stuck in the sand appear in the foreground. The crest and trough of the last ripple the rover crossed before getting stuck is visible in the center. These wind-formed sand features are only about 10 to 15 centimeters (4 to 6 inches) tall. The crest of the actual ripple where the rover got stuck can be seen just to the right of center. The tracks and a few other places on and near ripple crests can be seen in this color image to be dustier than the undisturbed or "normal" plains soils in Meridiani. Since the time these ruts were made, some of the dust there has been blown away by the wind, reaffirming the dynamic nature of the martian environment, even in this barren, ocean-like desert of sand.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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08-Apr-2005
 
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic from sol 421
Opportunity's View of 'Viking' Crater, Sol 421

On the 421st martian day, or sol, of its time on Mars (March 31,2005), NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drove to within about 10 meters (33 feet) of a small crater called "Viking." After completing the day's 71-meter (233-foot) drive across flatland of the Meridiani Planum region, the rover used its navigation camera to take images combined into this view of its new surroundings, including the crater. That day was the last of Opportunity's second extended mission. On April 1, both Opportunity and its twin, Spirit, began third extensions approved by NASA for up to 18 more months of exploring Mars. This view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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15-Mar-2005
 
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic
Opportunity View on Sol 397

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 397th martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (March 6, 2005). Opportunity had completed a drive of 124 meters (407 feet) across the rippled flatland of the Meridiani Planum region on the previous sol, but did not drive on this sol. This location is catalogued as Opportunity's site 48. The view is presented here as a cylindrical projection with geometric and brightness seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Opportunity navigation camera mosaic
Opportunity View on Sol 397 (3-D)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 397th martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (March 6, 2005). Opportunity had completed a drive of 124 meters (407 feet) across the rippled flatland of the Meridiani Planum region on the previous sol, but did not drive on this sol. This location is catalogued as Opportunity's site 48. This three-dimensional view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric and brightness seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Opportunity navigation camera mosaic
Opportunity View on Sol 397 (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 397th martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (March 6, 2005). Opportunity had completed a drive of 124 meters (407 feet) across the rippled flatland of the Meridiani Planum region on the previous sol, but did not drive on this sol. This location is catalogued as Opportunity's site 48. The view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric and brightness seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (133 kB) | Large (3.6 MB)
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic
Opportunity View on Sol 397 (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 397th martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (March 6, 2005). Opportunity had completed a drive of 124 meters (407 feet) across the rippled flatland of the Meridiani Planum region on the previous sol, but did not drive on this sol. This location is catalogued as Opportunity's site 48. The view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric and brightness seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (132 kB) | Large (3.5 MB)
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic
Opportunity View on Sol 398

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 398th martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (March 7, 2005). Opportunity drove 95 meters (312 feet) toward "Vostok Crater" that sol before taking the images. The drive was done in four steps: three "blind-drive" segments followed by a segment using the rover's autonomous navigation. This location is catalogued as Opportunity's site 49. The view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Opportunity navigation camera mosaic
Opportunity View on Sol 398 (3-D)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 398th martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (March 7, 2005). Opportunity drove 95 meters (312 feet) toward "Vostok Crater" that sol before taking the images. The drive was done in four steps: three "blind-drive" segments followed by a segment using the rover's autonomous navigation. This location is catalogued as Opportunity's site 49. This three-dimensional view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (128 kB) | Large (6.9 MB)
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic
Opportunity View on Sol 398 (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 398th martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (March 7, 2005). Opportunity drove 95 meters (312 feet) toward "Vostok Crater" that sol before taking the images. The drive was done in four steps: three "blind-drive" segments followed by a segment using the rover's autonomous navigation. This location is catalogued as Opportunity's site 49. This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (127 kB) | Large (4.0 MB)
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic
Beside 'Vostok Crater'

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 399th martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (March 8, 2005). Opportunity drove 35 meters (115 feet) that sol and reached the edge of "Vostok Crater" before taking the images. Sand has buried much of the crater. This location is catalogued as Opportunity's site 50. The view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (132 kB) | Large (3.8 MB)
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic
Beside 'Vostok Crater' (3-D)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 399th martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (March 8, 2005). Opportunity drove 35 meters (115 feet) that sol and reached the edge of "Vostok Crater" before taking the images. Sand has buried much of the crater. This location is catalogued as Opportunity's site 50. The three-dimensional view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. Two angular marks in the right half of the image are artifacts of image-compression data loss.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (164 kB) | Large (7.4 MB)
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic
Beside 'Vostok Crater' (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 399th martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (March 8, 2005). Opportunity drove 35 meters (115 feet) that sol and reached the edge of "Vostok Crater" before taking the images. Sand has buried much of the crater. This location is catalogued as Opportunity's site 50. This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (157 kB) | Large (4.2 MB)
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic
Beside 'Vostok Crater' (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 399th martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (March 8, 2005). Opportunity drove 35 meters (115 feet) that sol and reached the edge of "Vostok Crater" before taking the images. Sand has buried much of the crater. This location is catalogued as Opportunity's site 50. This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction. Two angular marks in the right half of the image are artifacts of image-compression data loss.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (158 kB) | Large (4.2 MB)
08-Mar-2005
 
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic from sol 381
Opportunity's View, Sol 381

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera on the rover's 381st and 382nd martian days, or sols, (Feb. 18 and 19, 2005) to take the images combined into this 360-degree panorama. Opportunity had driven 64 meters (209 feet) on sol 381 to arrive at this location close to a small crater dubbed "Alvin." The location is catalogued as Opportunity's Site 43. This view is presented in a cylindrical projection with with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (122 kB) | Large (3.5 MB)
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic from sol 381 (3-D)
Opportunity's View, Sol 381 (3-D)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera on the rover's 381st and 382nd martian days, or sols, (Feb. 18 and 19, 2005) to take the images combined into this stereo, 360-degree panorama. Opportunity had driven 64 meters (209 feet) on sol 381 to arrive at this location close to a small crater dubbed "Alvin." The location is catalogued as Opportunity's Site 43. This stereo view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (135 kB) | Large (7.2 MB)
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic from sol 381 (Left Eye)
Opportunity's View, Sol 381 (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera on the rover's 381st and 382nd martian days, or sols, (Feb. 18 and 19, 2005) to take the images combined into this 360-degree panorama. Opportunity had driven 64 meters (209 feet) on sol 381 to arrive at this location close to a small crater dubbed "Alvin." The location is catalogued as Opportunity's Site 43. This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (135 kB) | Large (3.7 MB)
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic from sol 381 (Right Eye)
Opportunity's View, Sol 381 (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera on the rover's 381st and 382nd martian days, or sols, (Feb. 18 and 19, 2005) to take the images combined into this 360-degree panorama. Opportunity had driven 64 meters (209 feet) on sol 381 to arrive at this location close to a small crater dubbed "Alvin." The location is catalogued as Opportunity's Site 43. This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (135 kB) | Large (3.6 MB)
04-Mar-2005
 
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic from sol 383
Record Drive Day, Opportunity Sol 383

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity set a one-day distance record for martian driving on the rover's 383rd martian day, or sol, which began on Feb. 19, 2005. Opportunity rolled 177.5 meters (582 feet) across the plain of Meridiani on that sol. It used its navigation camera after the drive to take the images that are combined into this mosaic view. The view is presented here in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (94.5 kB) | Large (3.3 MB)
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic from sol 383 (3-D)
Record Drive Day, Opportunity Sol 383 (3-D)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity set a one-day distance record for martian driving on the rover's 383rd martian day, or sol, which began on Feb. 19, 2005. Opportunity rolled 177.5 meters (582 feet) across the plain of Meridiani on that sol. It used its navigation camera after the drive to take the images that are combined into this stereo mosaic anaglyph. The view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (122 kB) | Large (5.8 MB)

Animation (813 kB)
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic from sol 383 (Left Eye)
Record Drive Day, Opportunity Sol 383 (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity set a one-day distance record for martian driving on the rover's 383rd martian day, or sol, which began on Feb. 19, 2005. Opportunity rolled 177.5 meters (582 feet) across the plain of Meridiani on that sol. It used its navigation camera after the drive to take the images that are combined into this mosaic view. This is the left-eye member of a stereo pair presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (101 kB) | Large (3.7 MB)

Animation (850 kB)
 
Opportunity navigation camera mosaic from sol 383 (Right Eye)
Record Drive Day, Opportunity Sol 383 (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity set a one-day distance record for martian driving on the rover's 383rd martian day, or sol, which began on Feb. 19, 2005. Opportunity rolled 177.5 meters (582 feet) across the plain of Meridiani on that sol. It used its navigation camera after the drive to take the images that are combined into this mosaic view. This is the right-eye member of a stereo pair presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (101 kB) | Large (3.6 MB)
01-Mar-2005
 
 
Navigation camera panorama from sol 387
'Naturaliste' Crater, Opportunity Sol 387

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this view of the rover's surroundings on Opportunity's 387th martian day, or sol (Feb. 24, 2005). Opportunity had driven about 73 meters (240 feet) and reached the eastern edge of a small crater dubbed "Naturaliste," seen in the right foreground. This view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric and brightness seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (413 kB) | Large (3.5 MB)
 
Navigation camera panorama from sol 387 (3-D)
'Naturaliste' Crater, Opportunity SOl 387 (3-D)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo view of the rover's surroundings on Opportunity's 387th martian day, or sol (Feb. 24, 2005). Opportunity had driven about 73 meters (240 feet) and reached the eastern edge of a small crater dubbed "Naturaliste," seen in the right foreground. This stereo view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric and brightness seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (773 kB) | Large (6.5 MB)
 
Navigation camera panorama from sol 387 (Left Eye)
'Naturaliste' Crater, Opportunity SOl 387 (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this view of the rover's surroundings on Opportunity's 387th martian day, or sol (Feb. 24, 2005). Opportunity had driven about 73 meters (240 feet) and reached the eastern edge of a small crater dubbed "Naturaliste," seen in the right foreground. This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric and brightness seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (127 kB) | Large (835 kB)
 
Navigation camera panorama from sol 387 (Right Eye)
'Naturaliste' Crater, Opportunity SOl 387 (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this view of the rover's surroundings on Opportunity's 387th martian day, or sol (Feb. 24, 2005). Opportunity had driven about 73 meters (240 feet) and reached the eastern edge of a small crater dubbed "Naturaliste," seen in the right foreground. This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric and brightness seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (127 kB) | Large (3.9 MB)
03-Feb-2005
 
 
approximately true-color mosaic of panoramic camera images
Impressive Impact

This stunning image features the heat shield impact site of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. This is an approximately true-color mosaic of panoramic camera images taken through the camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters.

The mosaic was acquired on Opportunity's sol 330 (Dec. 28, 2004), shortly after Opportunity arrived to investigate the site where its heat shield hit the ground south of "Endurance Crater" on Jan. 24, 2004. On the left, the main heat shield piece is inverted and reveals its metallic insulation layer, glinting in the sunlight. The main piece stands about 1 meter tall (about 3.3 feet) and about 13 meters (about 43 feet) from the rover.

The other large, flat piece of debris near the center of the image is about 14 meters (about 46 feet) away. The circular feature on the right side of the image is the crater made by the heat shield's impact. It is about 2.8 meters (9.2 feet) in diameter but only about 5 to 10 centimeters (about 2 to 4 inches) deep. The crater is about 6 meters (about 20 feet) from Opportunity in this view. Smaller fragments and debris can be seen all around the impact site.

The impact excavated a large amount of reddish subsurface material. Darker materials cover part of the crater's flat floor and have formed a streak or jet of material pointing toward the two largest heat shield fragments.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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02-Feb-2005
 
 
Sol 347: panorama assembled from images taken by Opportunity's navigation camera
Opportunity's View on Sol 347

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured this view of its heat shield debris field on the rover's 347th martian day, or sol (Jan. 14, 2005). The view is a southward-looking, 60-degree panorama assembled from four images taken by Opportunity's navigation camera. It is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction. The main piece of the heat shield is in the middle of the image, with the smaller flank piece behind it and the divot caused by the impact on the right.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (278 kB) | Large (1.4 MB)
 
Sol 347: panorama assembled from images taken by Opportunity's navigation camera (Left Eye)
Opportunity's View on Sol 347 (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured this view of its heat shield debris field on the rover's 347th martian day, or sol (Jan. 14, 2005). The view is a southward-looking, 60-degree panorama assembled from four images taken by Opportunity's navigation camera. It is the left-eye member of a stereo pair presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The main piece of the heat shield is in the middle of the image, with the smaller flank piece behind it and the divot caused by the impact on the right.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (286 kB) | Large (1.5 MB)
 
Sol 347: panorama assembled from images taken by Opportunity's navigation camera (Right Eye)
Opportunity's View on Sol 347 (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured this view of its heat shield debris field on the rover's 347th martian day, or sol (Jan. 14, 2005). The view is a southward-looking, 60-degree panorama assembled from four images taken by Opportunity's navigation camera. It is the right-eye member of a stereo pair presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. The main piece of the heat shield is in the middle of the image, with the smaller flank piece behind it and the divot caused by the impact on the right.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (287 kB) | Large (1.5 MB)
 
Sol 354: panorama assembled from images taken by Opportunity's navigation camera
Opportunity's View on Sol 354

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured this 360-degree panorama with its navigation camera on the rover's 354th martian day, or sol (Jan. 21, 2005). The view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction. Just to the right of center is the divot where Opportunity's heat shield hit the ground after protecting the spacecraft during descent through Mars'atmosphere. The heat shield was jettisoned about 90 seconds before Opportunity landed about 800 meters (half a mile) away. To the left of the divot is the flank portion of the heat shield debris and in the left foreground is the main wreckage of the heat shield. On the far right is a basketball-size rock dubbed "Heat Shield Rock," which Opportunity's inspection identified as an iron-nickel meteorite. The rim of "Endurance Crater" is visible on the horizon on both the left and right ends of this full-circle view.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (202 kB) | Large (4.1 MB)
 
Sol 354: panorama assembled from images taken by Opportunity's navigation camera (Left Eye)
Opportunity's View on Sol 354 (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured this 360-degree panorama with its navigation camera on the rover's 354th martian day, or sol (Jan. 21, 2005). The view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. Just to the right of center is the divot where Opportunity's heat shield hit the ground after protecting the spacecraft during descent through Mars'atmosphere. The heat shield was jettisoned about 90 seconds before Opportunity landed about 800 meters (half a mile) away. To the left of the divot is the flank portion of the heat shield debris and in the left foreground is the main wreckage of the heat shield. On the far right is a basketball-size rock dubbed "Heat Shield Rock," which Opportunity's inspection identified as an iron-nickel meteorite. The rim of "Endurance Crater" is visible on the horizon on both the left and right ends of this full-circle view.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (209 kB) | Large (4.5 MB)
 
Sol 354: panorama assembled from images taken by Opportunity's navigation camera (Right Eye)
Opportunity's View on Sol 354 (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured this 360-degree panorama with its navigation camera on the rover's 354th martian day, or sol (Jan. 21, 2005). The view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction. Just to the right of center is the divot where Opportunity's heat shield hit the ground after protecting the spacecraft during descent through Mars'atmosphere. The heat shield was jettisoned about 90 seconds before Opportunity landed about 800 meters (half a mile) away. To the left of the divot is the flank portion of the heat shield debris and in the left foreground is the main wreckage of the heat shield. On the far right is a basketball-size rock dubbed "Heat Shield Rock," which Opportunity's inspection identified as an iron-nickel meteorite. The rim of "Endurance Crater" is visible on the horizon on both the left and right ends of this full-circle view.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (210 kB) | Large (3.3 MB)
01-Feb-2005
 
 
Panoramic camera mosaic
Opportunity's View After Sol 321 Drive

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was on its way from "Endurance Crater" toward the spacecraft's jettisoned heat shield when the navigation camera took the images combined into this 360-degree panorama. Opportunity drove 60 meters (197 feet) on its 321st martian day, or sol (Dec. 18, 2004). These images were taken later that sol and on the following sol. The rover had spent 181 sols inside the crater. This view is presented in a cylindrical projection without seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Panoramic camera mosaic (3-D)
Opportunity's View After Sol 321 Drive (3-D)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was on its way from "Endurance Crater" toward the spacecraft's jettisoned heat shield when the navigation camera took the images combined into this stereo, 360-degree panorama. Opportunity drove 60 meters (197 feet) on its 321st martian day, or sol (Dec. 18, 2004). These images were taken later that sol and on the following sol. The rover had spent 181 sols inside the crater. This view is presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection without seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (192 kB) | Large (6 MB)
 
Panoramic camera mosaic (Left Eye)
Opportunity's View After Sol 321 Drive (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was on its way from "Endurance Crater" toward the spacecraft's jettisoned heat shield when the navigation camera took the images combined into this 360-degree panorama. Opportunity drove 60 meters (197 feet) on its 321st martian day, or sol (Dec. 18, 2004). These images were taken later that sol and on the following sol. The rover had spent 181 sols inside the crater. This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection without seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (174 kB) | Large (2.2 MB)
 
Panoramic camera mosaic (Right Eye)
Opportunity's View After Sol 321 Drive (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was on its way from "Endurance Crater" toward the spacecraft's jettisoned heat shield when the navigation camera took the images combined into this 360-degree panorama. Opportunity drove 60 meters (197 feet) on its 321st martian day, or sol (Dec. 18, 2004). These images were taken later that sol and on the following sol. The rover had spent 181 sols inside the crater. This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair presented in a cylindrical-perspective projection without seam correction.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
Browse Image | Medium Image (175 kB) | Large (2.2 MB)

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