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Panoramas: Opportunity
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03-Oct-2012
 
'Matijevic Hill' on Rim of Mars' Endeavour Crater, (Stereo View)
'Matijevic Hill' on Rim of Mars' Endeavour Crater, (Stereo View)

On the horizon in the right half of this panoramic view is an area of Mars informally named "Matijevic Hill," in commemoration of an influential rover-team leader. The view appears in three dimensions when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

The images combined into this view were taken by the navigation camera of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the mission's 3,054th Martian day, or sol (Aug. 26, 2012). The site is on the western rim of Endeavour Crater. The left side of the panorama shows portions of the rim farther south. 

Matijevic Hill commemorates Jacob Matijevic (1947-2012). He led the engineering team for the twin Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity for several years before and after their landings. Matijevic worked at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., from 1981 until his death in August 2012, most recently as chief engineer for surface operations systems of NASA's third-generation Mars rover, Curiosity. In the 1990s, he led the engineering team for the first Mars rover, Sojourner.

The hill includes an outcrop called Kirkwood, where Opportunity found a concentration of small spherical features. It also includes an area where clay minerals have been detected from orbiter observations.

Figure 1 and Figure 2 are the right-eye and left-eye views that were combined into the stereo view. 

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ. 


Stereo View
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Full Resolution (16.4 Mb)

Left View
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Full Resolution (5.47 Mb)

Right View
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Full Resolution (5.39 Mb)
07-Sept-2012
  NASA Mars Exploration Rover Team To Be Honored
Press Release
 
Opportunity's Surroundings on 3,000th Sol
Opportunity's Surroundings on 3,000th Sol

This 360-degree panorama assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exporation Rover Opportunity shows terrain surrounding the position where the rover spent its 3,000th Martian day, or sol, working on Mars (July 2, 2012). Opportunity completed its 90-sol prime mission in April 2004. It has continued to explore the Meridiani Planum region of Mars for more than eight years of bonus extended missions.

The Sol 3000 site is near the northern tip of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.  Bright toned material lines the perimeter of Cape York.

This panoramic view is centered to the south, with north at both ends. The component images were taken during sols 2989 through 2991.

Opportunity arrived at this location on Sol 2989 (June 20, 2012) with a drive bringing the mission's total driving distance as of Sol 3000 to 21.432 miles (34,492 meters). Here it examined a rock target called "Grasberg" with its microscopic imager and alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, both before and after grinding the surface off the target with the rover's rock abrasion tool.  Opportunity departed this location with an eastward drive of about 105 feet (32 meters) on Sol 3008 (July 10, 2012).

The scene is presented as a cylindrical projection in this image.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Opportunity's Surroundings on 3,000th Sol, in 3-D
Opportunity's Surroundings on 3,000th Sol, in 3-D

This 360-degree stereo panorama assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exporation Rover Opportunity shows terrain surrounding the position where the rover spent its 3,000th Martian day, or sol, working on Mars (July 2, 2012).

The scene appears three dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

Opportunity completed its 90-sol prime mission in April 2004. It has continued to explore the Meridiani Planum region of Mars for more than eight years of bonus extended missions.

The Sol 3000 site is near the northern tip of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.  Bright toned material lines the perimeter of Cape York.

This panoramic view is centered to the south, with north at both ends. The component images were taken during sols 2989 through 2991.

Opportunity arrived at this location on Sol 2989 (June 20, 2012) with a drive bringing the mission's total driving distance as of Sol 3000 to 21.432 miles (34,492 meters). Here it examined a rock target called "Grasberg" with its microscopic imager and alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, both before and after grinding the surface off the target with the rover's rock abrasion tool.  Opportunity departed this location with an eastward drive of about 105 feet (32 meters) on Sol 3008 (July 10, 2012).

The scene is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection in this image.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech


Stereo View
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Full Resolution (15 Mb)

Left View
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Right View
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Opportunity Eyes Rock Fins on Cape York, Sol 3058 (Stereo)
Opportunity Eyes Rock Fins on Cape York, Sol 3058 (Stereo)

Rock fins up to about 1 foot (30 centimeters) tall dominate this stereo scene from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The component images were taken during the 3,058th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars (Aug. 23, 2012). 

This stereo mosaic combines views from the left eye and right eye of the Pancam to appear three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses.

The view spans an area of terrain about 30 feet (9 meters) wide. Orbital investigation of the area has identified a possibility of clay minerals in this area of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State Univ.
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Opportunity Eyes Rock Fins on Cape York, Sol 3058 (False Color)
Opportunity Eyes Rock Fins on Cape York, Sol 3058 (False Color)

Rock fins up to about about 1 foot (30 centimeters) tall dominate this scene from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The component images were taken during the 3,058th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars (Aug. 23, 2012).  The view spans an area of terrain about 30 feet (9 meters) wide.

Orbital investigation of the area has identified a possibility of clay minerals in this area of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.

The view combines exposures taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet). It is presented in false color to make some differences between materials easier to see.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State Univ.
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Full Resolution (3.44 Mb)
 
Opportunity Eyes Rock Fins on Cape York, Sol 3058
Opportunity Eyes Rock Fins on Cape York, Sol 3058

Rock fins up to about 1 foot (30 centimeters) tall dominate this scene from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The component images were taken during the 3,058th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars (Aug. 23, 2012).  The view spans an area of terrain about 30 feet (9 meters) wide.

Orbital investigation of the area has identified a possibility of clay minerals in this area of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.

The view combines exposures taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet). It is presented in approximate true color, the camera team's best estimate of what the scene would look like if humans were there and able to see it with their own eyes.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State Univ.
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Full Resolution (2.5 Mb)
05-July-2012
Mars Panorama: Next Best Thing to Being There
Press Release
 
'Greeley Panorama' from Opportunity's Fifth Martian Winter (False Color)
'Greeley Panorama' from Opportunity's Fifth Martian Winter (False Color)

This full-circle scene combines 817 images taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. It shows the terrain that surrounded the rover while it was stationary for four months of work during its most recent Martian winter.

Opportunity's Pancam took the component images between the 2,811th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's Mars surface mission (Dec. 21, 2011) and Sol 2,947 (May 8, 2012). Opportunity spent those months on a northward sloped outcrop, "Greeley Haven," which angled the rover's solar panels toward the sun low in the northern sky during southern hemisphere winter. The outcrop's informal name is a tribute to Ronald Greeley (1939-2011), who was a member of the mission team and who taught generations of planetary scientists at Arizona State University, Tempe. The site is near the northern tip of the "Cape York" segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.

North is at the center of the image. South is at both ends. On the far left at the horizon is "Rich Morris Hill." That outcrop on Cape York was informally named in memory of John R. "Rich" Morris (1973-2011), an aerospace engineer and musician who was a Mars rover team member and mission manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena.

Bright wind-blown deposits on the left are banked up against the Greeley Haven outcrop. Opportunity's tracks can be seen extending from the south, with a turn-in-place and other maneuvers evident from activities to position the rover at Greeley Haven. The tracks in some locations have exposed darker underlying soils by disturbing a thin, bright dust cover.

Other bright, dusty deposits can be seen to the north, northeast, and east of Greeley Haven. The deposit at the center of the image, due north from the rover's winter location, is a dusty patch called "North Pole." Opportunity drove to it and investigated it in May 2012 as an example of wind-blown Martian dust.

The interior of Endeavour Crater can been seen just below the horizon in the right half of the scene, to the northeast and east of Cape York. The crater spans 14 miles (22 kilometers) in diameter.

Opportunity's solar panels and other structures show dust that has accumulated over the lifetime of the mission. Opportunity has been working on Mars since January 2004.

During the recent four months that Opportunity worked at Greeley Haven, activities included radio-science observations to better understand Martian spin axis dynamics and thus interior structure, investigations of the composition and textures of an outcrop exposing an impact-jumbled rock formation on the crater rim, monitoring the atmosphere and surface for changes, and acquisition of this full-color mosaic of the surroundings.

The panorama combines exposures taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet). The view is presented in false color to make some differences between materials easier to see.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State Univ.

Stero View
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05-Jan-2012
'Greeley Haven' Is Winter Workplace for Mars Rover
Full Press Release
 
'Greeley Haven' Site for Opportunity's Fifth Martian Winter
'Greeley Haven' Site for Opportunity's Fifth Martian Winter

This mosaic was acquired by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's Panoramic Camera (Pancam) on Sol 2793 (Dec. 2, 2011). It shows a north-facing outcrop, informally named "Greeley Haven," where Opportunity will work during the rover's fifth Martian winter. The rover team chose this designation as a tribute to the influential planetary geologist Ronald Greeley (1939-2011), who was a member of the science team for the Mars rovers and many other interplanetary missions.

The site is of interest not only for its geologic features but because it has favorable northerly slopes to optimize Opportunity's solar energy as winter approaches in the southern hemisphere of Mars. After this mosaic was acquired, Opportunity backed up the slope to park at approximately 16 degrees northerly tilt and used tools on its robotic arm (Instrument Deployment Device, or IDD) to examine rock and soil targets. After deciding that the site could serve the mission well for the next several months, the team designated it as a memorial for Greeley, who taught generations of planetary scientists at Arizona State University, Tempe, until his death on Oct. 27, 2011.

The site is near the northern tip of the "Cape York" segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.

The image combines exposures taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet). The view is presented in approximate true color. This "natural color" is the rover team's best estimate of what the scene would look like if humans were there and able to see it with their own eyes.

Plans for research continuing through the months at Greeley Haven include a radio-science investigation of the interior of Mars, inspections of mineral compositions and textures on the outcrop, and assembly of a full-circle, color panorama of the surroundings. The planned full-circle image will be called the Greeley Panorama.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State Univ.
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Full Resolution (9.2 MB)
 
'Greeley Haven' Site for Opportunity's Fifth Martian Winter (False Color)
'Greeley Haven' Site for Opportunity's Fifth Martian Winter (False Color)

This mosaic was acquired by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's Panoramic Camera (Pancam) on Sol 2793 (Dec. 2, 2011). It shows a north-facing outcrop, informally named "Greeley Haven," where Opportunity will work during the rover's fifth Martian winter. The rover team chose this designation as a tribute to the influential planetary geologist Ronald Greeley (1939-2011), who was a member of the science team for the Mars rovers and many other interplanetary missions.

The site is of interest not only for its geologic features but because it has favorable northerly slopes to optimize Opportunity's solar energy as winter approaches in the southern hemisphere of Mars. After this mosaic was acquired, Opportunity backed up the slope to park at approximately 16 degrees northerly tilt and used tools on its robotic arm (Instrument Deployment Device, or IDD) to examine rock and soil targets. After deciding that the site could serve the mission well for the next several months, the team designated it as a memorial for Greeley, who taught generations of planetary scientists at Arizona State University, Tempe, until his death on Oct. 27, 2011.

The site is near the northern tip of the "Cape York" segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.

The image combines exposures taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet). The view is presented in false color to make some differences between materials easier to see.

Plans for research continuing through the months at Greeley Haven include a radio-science investigation of the interior of Mars, inspections of mineral compositions and textures on the outcrop, and assembly of a full-circle, color panorama of the surroundings. The planned full-circle image will be called the Greeley Panorama.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State Univ.
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Full Resolution (17.3 MB)

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