NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology JPL HOME EARTH SOLAR SYSTEM STARS & GALAXIES SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY JPL Email News RSS Mobile Video
Follow this link to skip to the main content
JPL banner - links to JPL and CalTech
left nav graphic Overview Science Technology The Mission People Spotlights Events Multimedia All Mars
Mars for Kids
Mars for Students
Mars for Educators
Mars for Press
+ Mars Home
+ Rovers Home
Multimedia
Summary
Images
Press Release Images
Spirit
Opportunity
All Raw Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Panoramas
Spirit
Opportunity
3-D Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Special-Effects Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Spacecraft
Mars Artwork
Landing Sites
Videos
Podcasts
Panoramas: Opportunity
2004   |   2005   |   2006   |   2007   |   2008   |   2009
   2010   |   2011   |   2012   |   2013   |   2014   |   2015   
16-Oct-2014
 
This vista from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows
Opportunity's Northward View of 'Wdowiak Ridge'

This vista from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows "Wdowiak Ridge," from left foreground to center, as part of a northward look with the rover's tracks visible at right.

Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) recorded the component images for this mosaic on Sept. 17, 2014, during the 3,786th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars.

The ridge stands prominently on the western rim of Endeavour crater, about 200 yards or meters west of the rim's main crest line. Its informal name is a tribute to Opportunity science team member Thomas J. Wdowiak (1939-2013).

This panorama spans about 70 compass degrees from north-northwest on the left to east-northeast on the right. Wdowiak Ridge rises steeply about 40 feet from base to top. It extends about 500 feet (150 meters) in length. For scale, the distance between Opportunity's parallel wheel tracks is about 3.3 feet (1 meter).

Wdowiak Ridge is visible from overhead in the map at http://mars.nasa.gov/mer/mission/tm-opportunity/images/MERB_Sol3798_1.jpg , from the northeastern end near the rover's Sol 3751 location to Odyssey Crater near the rover's Sol 3789 location.

This version of the image is presented in approximate true color by combing exposures taken through three of the Pancam's color filters, centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near-infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet).

Image Credit:
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ. 

Browse Image | Medium Image | Large Image

This north-looking vista from NASA's Mars Rover Opportunity shows 'Wdowiak Ridge,' from left foreground to center. This version is presented in false color, which enhances visibility of the rover's wheel tracks at right.
Opportunity's Northward View of 'Wdowiak Ridge' (False Color)

This vista from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows "Wdowiak Ridge," from left foreground to center, as part of a northward look with the rover's tracks visible at right.

Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) recorded the component images for this mosaic on Sept. 17, 2014, during the 3,786th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars.

The ridge stands prominently on the western rim of Endeavour crater, about 200 yards or meters west of the rim's main crest line. Its informal name is a tribute to Opportunity science team member Thomas J. Wdowiak (1939-2013).

This panorama spans about 70 compass degrees from north-northwest on the left to east-northeast on the right. Wdowiak Ridge rises steeply about 40 feet from base to top. It extends about 500 feet (150 meters) in length. For scale, the distance between Opportunity's parallel wheel tracks is about 3.3 feet (1 meter).

This version of the image is presented in false color, which enhances visibility of the wheel tracks. It combines exposures taken through three of the Pancam's color filters, centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near-infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet).

Wdowiak Ridge is visible from overhead in the map at http://mars.nasa.gov/mer/mission/tm-opportunity/images/MERB_Sol3798_1.jpg , from the northeastern end near the rover's Sol 3751 location to Odyssey Crater near the rover's Sol 3789 location.

Image Credit:  NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ. 

Browse Image | Medium Image | Large Image

Opportunity's View of 'Wdowiak Ridge' (Stereo) 
This stereo vista from NASA's Mars Rover Opportunity shows 'Wdowiak Ridge,' from left foreground to center, as part of a northward look. The image combines Sept. 17, 2014, views from the left eye and right eye of Opportunity's Pancam to appear three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses.
Opportunity's Northward View of 'Wdowiak Ridge' (Stereo)

This stereo vista from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows "Wdowiak Ridge," from left foreground to center, as part of a northward look with the rover's tracks visible at right. The image combines views from the left eye and right eye of Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) to appear three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses with the red lens on the left.

Opportunity's Pancam recorded the component images for this mosaic on Sept. 17, 2014, during the 3,786th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars.

The ridge stands prominently on the western rim of Endeavour crater, about 200 yards or meters west of the rim's main crest line. Its informal name is a tribute to Opportunity science team member Thomas J. Wdowiak (1939-2013).

This panorama spans about 70 compass degrees from north-northwest on the left to east-northeast on the right. Wdowiak Ridge rises steeply about 40 feet from base to top. It extends about 500 feet (150 meters) in length. For scale, the distance between Opportunity's parallel wheel tracks is about 3.3 feet (1 meter).

Wdowiak Ridge is visible from overhead in the map at http://mars.nasa.gov/mer/mission/tm-opportunity/images/MERB_Sol3798_1.jpg , from the northeastern end near the rover's Sol 3751 location to Odyssey Crater near the rover's Sol 3789 location.

Image Credit:  NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ. 

Browse Image | Medium Image | Large Image

09-Sep-2014
 
Rover Tracks in Northward View Along West Rim of Endeavour
Rover Tracks in Northward View Along West Rim of Endeavour

This scene from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity looks back toward part of the west rim of Endeavour Crater that the rover drove along, heading southward, during the summer of 2014.

The vista merges multiple Pancam exposures taken on August 15, 2014, during the 3,754th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars. 

The high point on the rim in the left half of the scene is the southern end of "Murray Ridge." Tracks from drives from mid-July 2014 are faintly visible near there, and tracks from subsequent drives advance to the foreground. For scale, the distance between Opportunity's parallel wheel tracks is about 3.3 feet (1 meter).

The most distant visible tracks are from nearly half a mile (more than 700 meters) prior to Opportunity's arrival at the viewpoint from which this scene was recorded.

This version of the image is presented in approximate true color by combing exposures taken through three of the Pancam's color filters, centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near-infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet). 

A false-color version, at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18605, makes the tracks more visible. A video at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/video/?id=1325 places the scene into context of the rover's entire route of more than 25 miles (40 kilometers) since its 2004 landing. A map indicating the rover's Sol 3754 location (as the location reached by a Sol 3752 drive) is online at http://mars.nasa.gov/mer/mission/tm-opportunity/opportunity-sol3757.html . 

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ. 


Browse Image | Large Image

Rover Tracks in Northward View Along West Rim of Endeavour, False Color
Rover Tracks in Northward View Along West Rim of Endeavour, False Color

This scene from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity looks back toward part of the west rim of Endeavour Crater that the rover drove along, heading southward, during the summer of 2014.

The vista merges multiple Pancam exposures taken on August 15, 2014, during the 3,754th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars. 

The high point on the rim in the left half of the scene is the southern end of "Murray Ridge." Tracks from drives from mid-July 2014 are faintly visible near there, and tracks from subsequent drives advance to the foreground. For scale, the distance between Opportunity's parallel wheel tracks is about 3.3 feet (1 meter).

The most distant visible tracks are from nearly half a mile (more than 700 meters) prior to Opportunity's arrival at the viewpoint from which this scene was recorded.

This version of the image is presented in false color, which enhances visibility of the wheel tracks. It combines exposures taken through three of the Pancam's color filters, centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near-infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet). 

A video at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/video/?id=1325 places the scene into context of the rover's entire route of more than 25 miles (40 kilometers) since its 2004 landing. A map indicating the rover's Sol 3754 location (as the location reached by a Sol 3752 drive) is online athttp://mars.nasa.gov/mer/mission/tm-opportunity/opportunity-sol3757.html . 

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ. 


Browse Image | Large Image

Rover's Tracks in Stereo View Along Rim of Endeavour Crater
Rover's Tracks in Stereo View Along Rim of Endeavour Crater

This scene from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity looks back toward part of the west rim of Endeavour Crater that the rover drove along, heading southward, during the summer of 2014. The image combines views from the left eye and right eye of the Pancam to appear three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses with the red lens on the left.

Pancam acquired the component exposures on August 15, 2014, during the 3,754th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars. 

The high point on the rim in the left half of the scene is the southern end of "Murray Ridge." Tracks from drives from mid-July 2014 are faintly visible near there, and tracks from subsequent drives advance to the foreground. For scale, the distance between Opportunity's parallel wheel tracks is about 3.3 feet (1 meter).

The most distant visible tracks are from nearly half a mile (more than 700 meters) prior to Opportunity's arrival at the viewpoint from which this scene was recorded.

A video at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/video/?id=1325 places the scene into context of the rover's entire route of more than 25 miles (40 kilometers) since its 2004 landing. A map indicating the rover's Sol 3754 location (as the location reached by a Sol 3752 drive) is online athttp://mars.nasa.gov/mer/mission/tm-opportunity/opportunity-sol3757.html . 

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ. 


Browse Image | Large Image

29-Aug-2014
 
Spirit Mars Rover in 'McMurdo' Panorama
Opportunity's Rear-Facing View Ahead After a Drive

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured this scene looking farther southward just after completing a southward drive, in reverse, during the 3,749th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Aug. 10, 2014).

The foreground of this view from the rover's mast-mounted navigation camera (Navcam) includes the top of the rover's low-gain antenna, at lower right, and the rear portion of the rover's deck, with the sundial of a camera calibration target. For scale, the largest of the sundial's concentric rings has an outer diameter of 3.15 inches (8 centimeters).

The ground beyond the rover includes some windblown lines of sand. At the horizon is part of the crest line of the west ridge of Endeavour Crater. The Sol 3749 drive covered 338 feet (103 meters) along the outer slope of the crater rim. A map of the area with the Sol 3749 endpoint marked is available online at http://mars.nasa.gov/mer/mission/tm-opportunity/opportunity-sol3751.html

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech


Browse Image | Large Image

14-Aug-2014

Spirit Mars Rover in 'McMurdo' Panorama
Opportunity's Surroundings After 25 Miles on Mars

This panorama combines several images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity to show the rover's surroundings after surpassing 25 miles (40.23 kilometers) of total driving on Mars.

The component images were taken on July 29, 2014, during the 3,737th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars, prior to that sol's drive. The rover's location was the point it reached with a drive of 157 feet (48 meters) on Sol 3735 (July 27, 2014), which brought Opportunity's total odometry to 25.01 miles (40.25 kilometers).

The site is on the western side of the west rim of Endeavour Crater. This full-circle vista is centered approximately to the east, with the crater rim extending northward in the left half and southward in the right half.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech


Browse Image | Large Image

24-June-2014
 
 
'Pillinger Point' Overlooking Endeavour Crater on Mars' on Mars
'Pillinger Point' Overlooking Endeavour Crater on Mars

This scene from the panoramic camera (Pancam) of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity catches "Pillinger Point," on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, in the foreground. The eastern rim of the crater is on the distant horizon. Endeavour Crater is 14 miles (22 kilometers) in diameter.

The vista spans from north-northwest, at the left, to south-southwest, at the right. It merges several Pancam exposures taken on the 3,663rd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars (May 14, 2014). The scene is presented in approximate true color by combing exposures taken through three of the Pancam's color filters, centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near-infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet).

Opportunity's international science team chose Pillinger Point as the informal name for this ridge as a tribute to Colin Pillinger (1943-2014). Pillinger was the British principal investigator for the Beagle 2 project, which attempted to set a lander on Mars a few weeks before Opportunity's January 2004 landing.

The site became a destination for Opportunity to examine because observations from orbit indicated the presence of a clay mineral named montmorillonite, which forms under wet conditions.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.


Browse Image | Medium Image | Full Resolution
 
'Pillinger Point' Overlooking Endeavour Crater on Mars False Color
'Pillinger Point' Overlooking Endeavour Crater on Mars (False Color)

This scene from the panoramic camera (Pancam) of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity catches "Pillinger Point," on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, in the foreground. It is presented in false color to make differences in surface materials more easily visible.

The eastern rim of the crater is on the distant horizon. Endeavour Crater is 14 miles (22 kilometers) in diameter.

The vista spans from north-northwest, at the left, to south-southwest, at the right. It combines several Pancam exposures taken on the 3,663rd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars (May 14, 2014). The exposures were taken through three of the Pancam's color filters, centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near-infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet).

Opportunity's international science team chose Pillinger Point as the informal name for this ridge as a tribute to Colin Pillinger (1943-2014). Pillinger was the British principal investigator for the Beagle 2 project, which attempted to set a lander on Mars a few weeks before Opportunity's January 2004 landing.

The site became a destination for Opportunity to examine because observations from orbit indicated the presence of a clay mineral named montmorillonite, which forms under wet conditions.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.


Browse Image | Medium Image | Full Resolution
 
'Pillinger Point' Overlooking Endeavour Crater on Mars Stereo
'Pillinger Point' Overlooking Endeavour Crater on Mars (Stereo)

This stereo vista from the panoramic camera (Pancam) of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity catches "Pillinger Point," on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, in the foreground. The image combines views from the left eye and right eye of the Pancam to appear three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses with the red lens on the left.

The eastern rim of the crater is on the distant horizon. Endeavour Crater is 14 miles (22 kilometers) in diameter.

The vista spans from north-northwest, at the left, to south-southwest, at the right. It combines several Pancam exposures taken on the 3,663rd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars (May 14, 2014).

Opportunity's international science team chose Pillinger Point as the informal name for this ridge as a tribute to Colin Pillinger (1943-2014). Pillinger was the British principal investigator for the Beagle 2 project, which attempted to set a lander on Mars a few weeks before Opportunity's January 2004 landing.

The site became a destination for Opportunity to examine because observations from orbit indicated the presence of a clay mineral named montmorillonite, which forms under wet conditions.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.



Stereo View
Browse Image | Medium Image | Full Resolution

19-May-2014
 
 
Endeavour Crater Rim From 'Murray Ridge' on Mars
Endeavour Crater Rim From 'Murray Ridge' on Mars

This vista of the Endeavour Crater rim was acquired by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from the southern end of "Murray Ridge" on the western rim of the crater. It combines several exposures taken by the rover's panoramic camera (Pancam) on the 3,637th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (April 18, 2014).

The view extends from the east-southeast on the left to southward on the right. It encompasses the far rim of Endeavour Crater on the left and the crater's western rim on the right. Endeavour is 14 miles (22 kilometers) in diameter.

The small impact crater visible in the distance on the slopes of the far rim is about 740 feet (about 225 meters) in diameter and is 13 miles (21 kilometers) away. The high peak in the distance on the right is informally named "Cape Tribulation" and is about 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) to the south of Opportunity's position when this view was recorded. The rim curves off to the left from Cape Tribulation in a series of peaks towards the far southern crater rim.

The floor of Endeavour crater is filled with dark sand, brighter dust, and, in the distance, dusty haze. Outcrops here on the western rim are crater ejecta covered in the foreground by dark sand ripples. On Sol 3662 (May 13, 2014), Opportunity approached the dark outcrops about halfway down on the right side of the image.

The view merges exposures taken through three of the Pancam's color filters, centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near-infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet). It is presented in approximately true color.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.


Browse Image | Medium Image | Full Resolution
 
Endeavour Crater Rim From 'Murray Ridge' on Mars, False Color
Endeavour Crater Rim From 'Murray Ridge' on Mars, False Color

This vista of the Endeavour Crater rim was acquired by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from the southern end of "Murray Ridge" on the western rim of the crater. It combines several exposures taken by the rover's panoramic camera (Pancam) on the 3,637th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (April 18, 2014). It is presented in false color to make differences in surface materials more easily visible.  

The view extends from the east-southeast on the left to southward on the right. It encompasses the far rim of Endeavour Crater on the left and the crater's western rim on the right. Endeavour is 14 miles (22 kilometers) in diameter.

The small impact crater visible in the distance on the slopes of the far rim is about 740 feet (about 225 meters) in diameter and is 13 miles (21 kilometers) away. The high peak in the distance on the right is informally named "Cape Tribulation" and is about 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) to the south of Opportunity's position when this view was recorded. The rim curves off to the left from Cape Tribulation in a series of peaks towards the far southern crater rim.

The floor of Endeavour crater is filled with dark sand, brighter dust, and, in the distance, dusty haze. Outcrops here on the western rim are crater ejecta covered in the foreground by dark sand ripples. On Sol 3662 (May 13, 2014), Opportunity approached the dark outcrops about halfway down on the right side of the image.

The view merges exposures taken through three of the Pancam's color filters, centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near-infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet).

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.


Browse Image | Medium Image | Full Resolution
 
Approaching Target Deposit on Mars Crater Rim
Approaching Target Deposit on Mars Crater Rim

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to capture the component images for this 360-degree view along the crest of Endeavour Crater's western rim.

The view is centered toward southeast. The western rim of the crater extends northward to the left and southward to the right.  Endeavour is about 14

This vista of the Endeavour Crater rim was acquired by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from the southern end of "Murray Ridge" on the western rim of the crater. It combines several exposures taken by the rover's panoramic camera (Pancam) on the 3,637th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (April 18, 2014). It is presented in false color to make differences in surface materials more easily visible.  

The view extends from the east-southeast on the left to southward on the right. It encompasses the far rim of Endeavour Crater on the left and the crater's western rim on the right. Endeavour is 14 miles (22 kilometers) in diameter.

The small impact crater visible in the distance on the slopes of the far rim is about 740 feet (about 225 meters) in diameter and is 13 miles (21 kilometers) away. The high peak in the distance on the right is informally named "Cape Tribulation" and is about 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) to the south of Opportunity's position when this view was recorded. The rim curves off to the left from Cape Tribulation in a series of peaks towards the far southern crater rim.

The floor of Endeavour crater is filled with dark sand, brighter dust, and, in the distance, dusty haze. Outcrops here on the western rim are crater ejecta covered in the foreground by dark sand ripples. On Sol 3662 (May 13, 2014), Opportunity approached the dark outcrops about halfway down on the right side of the image.

The view merges exposures taken through three of the Pancam's color filters, centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near-infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet).

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.

Stereo View
Browse Image | Medium Image | Full Resolution

Left View
Browse Image | Medium Image | Full Resolution

Right View
Browse Image | Medium Image | Full Resolution

 
Opportunity's Tracks Near Crater Rim's Ridge (Stereo)
Opportunity's Tracks Near Crater Rim Ridgeline (Stereo)

The component images for this stereo, 360-degree panorama were taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity after the rover drove about 97 feet (29.5 meters) during the mission's 3,642nd Martian day, or sol (April 22, 2014). 

The vista appears three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses with the red lens on the left.

Opportunity drove southwestward on Sol 3642, so the tracks from this end-of-drive position recede toward the northeast.  For scale, the distance between the two parallel tracks is about 3.3 feet (1 meter).

The position is just west of the ridgeline of the west rim of Endeavour Crater.

This stereo anaglyph combines the left-eye view in Figure 1 and the right-eye view in http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18098 .

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech


Stereo View
Browse Image | Medium Image | Full Resolution

Left View
Browse Image | Medium Image | Full Resolution

Right View
Browse Image | Medium Image | Full Resolution

17-Apr-2014
 
 
Cleaned Solar Arrays Gleam in Mars Rover's New Selfie
Cleaned Solar Arrays Gleam in Mars Rover's New Selfie

A self-portrait of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity taken in late March 2014 (right) shows that much of the dust on the rover's solar arrays has been removed since a similar portrait from January 2014 (left). Both were taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam).

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.


Browse Image | Medium Image | Large

23-Jan-2014
 
Diverse Outcrops on 'Matijevic Hill'
Diverse Outcrops on 'Matijevic Hill'

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to capture this false-color panorama of the "Matijevic Hill" area on the "Cape York" segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater. Some of the outcrops that the rover examined are labeled. The breccias are jumbled rocks amalgamated together, interpreted at this site as material tossed by the impact that excavated the crater.

The component images for this scene were taken during the interval Nov. 19, 2012, through Dec. 3, 2012. Unannotated versions of this panorama, in false color, approximately true color and stereo, are at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16704, http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16703 and http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16709.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.


Browse Image | Full Resolution

JPL Image Use Policy

USA.gov
PRIVACY    |     FAQ    |     SITEMAP    |     CREDITS