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Press Release Images: Opportunity
27-Jan-2004
Scientists Thrilled To See Layers in Mars Rocks Near Opportunity
Full Press Release
 
Not of this Earth (3-D)
Not of this Earth (3-D)

This sweeping 3-D look at the unusual rock outcropping near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was captured by the rover's panoramic camera. Scientists believe the layered rocks are either volcanic ash deposits, or sediments laid down by wind or water. Opportunity landed at Meridiani Planum, Mars on January 24 at 9:05 p.m. PST.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Not of this Earth
Not of this Earth

This sweeping look at the unusual rock outcropping near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was captured by the rover's left panoramic camera. Scientists believe the layered rocks are either volcanic ash deposits, or sediments laid down by wind or water. Opportunity landed at Meridiani Planum, Mars on January 24 at 9:05 p.m. PST.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Not of this Earth-2
Not of this Earth-2

This sweeping look at the unusual rock outcropping near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was captured by the rover's right panoramic camera. Scientists believe the layered rocks are either volcanic ash deposits, or sediments laid down by wind or water. Opportunity landed at Meridiani Planum, Mars on January 24 at 9:05 p.m. PST.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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A Precious Opportunity
A Precious Opportunity

This three-dimensional model superimposes the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on one of its potential targets, a scientific treasure chest of martian rocks contained within the landing site, a crater on Meridiani Planum, Mars. The rover is placed on the rock outcrop for scale. Opportunity has not yet visited these rocks; it is currently still on its lander. Scientists plan to use the tools on the rover's instrument deployment device, or robotic "arm," to examine these rocks, which are about 10 centimeters (4 inches) high and approximately 8 meters (26 feet) away from the rover. The image of the terrain was acquired on Sol, or martian day, 2 of Opportunity's journey. This model was created using data from the rover's panoramic camera and is displayed using software developed by NASA's Ames Research Center.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/Ames/Maas Digital LLC
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