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Press Release Images: Opportunity
08-Apr-2004
NASA Extends Mars Rovers' Mission
Full Press Release
 
At the Edge of 'Anatolia'
At the Edge of 'Anatolia'

This 360-degree image mosaic was constructed from a sequence of images taken by the navigation camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The mosaic was created from 10 images.

The images were acquired on the 72nd martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum. The camera acquired the images at approximately 16:00 local solar time, or just before midnight Pacific Daylight Time on April 6, 2004.

The image was taken from the rover's current position along the edge of the large trough dubbed "Anatolia," located some 150 meters (492 feet) away from "Eagle Crater". Scientists will likely investigate the rocks contained here in coming sols. They are also interested in the area's soil, which � as evident from the rover's shallow tracks � appears stronger than that of Eagle Crater. The dark crater behind the trough can be seen from orbit.

Anatolia was named after the Anatolian fault system in Turkey.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Meridiani Destinations
Meridiani Destinations

The starting point and planned destinations for surface travels of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity are indicated on this image of territory within Mars' Meridiani Planum region. Opportunity landed on Jan. 24, 2004, (Universal Time) in the small bowl later nicknamed "Eagle Crater." After about two months of examining rocks and soils within that crater, the rover set out toward a larger crater informally named "Endurance." During an extended mission following its three-month prime mission, Opportunity may finish examining Endurance, then head for a type of landscape to the southeast called "etched terrain." There, additional deposits of layered bedrock may lie exposed. The underlying image for the map was taken from orbit by the camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/MSSS
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Looking Back, Opportunity Sol 70
Looking Back, Opportunity Sol 70

The rear hazard-avoidance camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity caught this view of the rover's freshly made tracks after a record drive of 100 meters (328 feet) during sol 70 of the rover's mission (April 5, 2004).

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Building Up Endurance
Building Up Endurance

This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's navigation camera shows the rover's forward view at Meridiani Planum, Mars, on Sol 70 of the mission (April 5, 2004). The crater dubbed "Endurance Crater," a future rover target less than 1 kilometer (0.6 miles) away, can be seen on the far right. On the left is a trough region dubbed "Anatolia," located some 150 meters (492 feet) away from the rover's previous location "Eagle Crater." The shadow of the rover's panoramic camera mast assembly can be seen on the bottom right.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Building Up Endurance
Building Up Endurance

This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's navigation camera shows the rover's forward view at Meridiani Planum, Mars, on Sol 70 of the mission (April 5, 2004). The crater dubbed "Endurance Crater," a future rover target less than 1 kilometer (0.6 miles) away, can be seen on the far right. On the left is a trough region dubbed "Anatolia," located some 150 meters (492 feet) away from the rover's previous location "Eagle Crater." The shadow of the rover's panoramic camera mast assembly can be seen on the bottom right.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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Opportunity's Turf
Opportunity's Turf

This map highlights the past and future stomping grounds of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. "Eagle Crater" is the small crater where the rover landed over two months ago. "Anatolia," named after the Anatolian fault system in Turkey, is the trough the rover is currently investigating. "Endurance" is the large crater the rover will travel toward in coming sols. The underlying image was taken by the camera onboard the Mars Global Surveyor orbiter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/MSSS
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