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Press Release Images: Opportunity
01-Sep-2005
 
This image shows a view of 'Lemon Rind' (Annotated Version)

This image shows a view of 'Lemon Rind'
Rind-Like Features at a Meridiani Outcrop

After months spent crossing a sea of rippled sands, Opportunity reached an outcrop in August 2005 and began investigating exposures of sedimentary rocks, intriguing rind-like features that appear to cap the rocks, and cobbles that dot the martian surface locally. Opportunity spent several martian days, or sols, analyzing a feature called "Lemon Rind," a thin surface layer covering portions of outcrop rocks poking through the sand north of "Erebus Crater." In images from the panoramic camera, Lemon Rind appears slightly different in color than surrounding rocks. It also appears to be slightly more resistant to wind erosion than the outcrop's interior. This is an approximately true-color composite produced from frames taken during Opportunity's 552nd martian day, or sol (Aug. 13, 2005).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell

Annotated Version:
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Original Version:
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This traverse map is overlaid on a mosaic of images from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey orbiters and from Opportunity's descent camera.
Opportunity's Path, Landing to Sol 562

In its first 562 martian days, or sols, after landing in Mars' Meridiani Planum region, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drove a total of 5.74 kilometers (3.57 miles). At that time, Aug. 23, 2005, the rover was nearing "Erebus" Crater, a landmark and target of interest on the route toward a possible destination of the larger "Victoria" Crater farther south. This traverse map is overlaid on a mosaic of images from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey orbiters and from Opportunity's descent camera. The scale bar at lower left is 1.4 kilometers (0.87 mile) long.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/ASU/MSSS
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Opportunity Examines Cracks and Coatings on Mars Rocks

This false-color panoramic image, taken on martian day, or sol, 561 (Aug. 22, 2005) by NASA's Opportunity rover, shows the nature of the outcrop rocks that the rover is encountering on its southward journey across the martian plains to "Erebus Crater." The rocks, similar in make-up to those encountered earlier in the mission, display a clear pattern of cracks as well as rind-like features (identifiable as a light shade of blue to olive in the image) coating the outcrop surface. Prominent in the image are two holes (one on the rock, one on the rind) drilled with the rover's rock abrasion tool to facilitate chemical analysis of the underlying material. The reddish color around the holes is from iron-rich dust produced during the grinding operation. The rind, nicknamed "Lemon Rind," and the underlying rock, nicknamed "Strawberry," have turned out to be similar in overall chemistry and texture. Science team members are working to understand the nature of the relationship between these kinds of rocks and rinds on the Meridiani plains. This false-color composite was generated from a combination of 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filter images taken by the Opportunity panoramic camera, an instrument that has acquired more than 36,000 color filter images to date of martian terrain at Meridiani Planum.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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