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Press Release Images: Opportunity
22-Jan-2009
 
 
View from West of Victoria Crater, Sol 1664

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,664th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (September 28, 2008). Opportunity had driven 152.8 meters (501 feet) southward on the preceding sol, reaching this location on the west side of Victoria Crater. View the maps of the traverse to this point.

Rover tracks from the Sol 1663 drive extend northward in this image. For scale, the two parallel tracks are about 1 meter (39 inches) apart. To the right of center, Victoria Crater is visible from the north-northeast to the east-southeast. The far right and left edges of the image are to the south.

Opportunity drove away from this location on Sol 1666 (September 30, 2008), with a drive of 129.9 meters (426 feet) further southward.

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (164 kB) | Large (1.1 MB)
Full-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
 
View from West of Victoria Crater, Sol 1664 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle, stereo view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,664th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (September 28, 2008). Opportunity had driven 152.8 meters (501 feet) southward on the preceding sol, reaching this location on the west side of Victoria Crater. View the maps of the traverse to this point.

This image combines views from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

Rover tracks from the Sol 1663 drive extend northward in the image. For scale, the two parallel tracks are about 1 meter (39 inches) apart. To the right of center, Victoria Crater is visible from the north-northeast to the east-southeast. The far right and left edges of the image are to the south.

Opportunity drove away from this location on Sol 1666 (September 30, 2008), with a drive of 129.9 meters (426 feet) further southward.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (197 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
Full-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
 
View from West of Victoria Crater, Sol 1664 (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,664th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (September 28, 2008). Opportunity had driven 152.8 meters (501 feet) southward on the preceding sol, reaching this location on the west side of Victoria Crater. View the maps of the traverse to this point.

Rover tracks from the Sol 1663 drive extend northward in this image. For scale, the two parallel tracks are about 1 meter (39 inches) apart. To the right of center, Victoria Crater is visible from the north-northeast to the east-southeast. The far right and left edges of the image are to the south.

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (193 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
Full-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
 
View from West of Victoria Crater, Sol 1664 (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,664th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (September 28, 2008). Opportunity had driven 152.8 meters (501 feet) southward on the preceding sol, reaching this location on the west side of Victoria Crater. View the maps of the traverse to this point.

Rover tracks from the Sol 1663 drive extend northward in this image. For scale, the two parallel tracks are about 1 meter (39 inches) apart. To the right of center, Victoria Crater is visible from the north-northeast to the east-southeast. The far right and left edges of the image are to the south.

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (190 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
Full-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
View from West of Victoria Crater, Sol 1664 (Polar)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,664th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (September 28, 2008). Opportunity had driven 152.8 meters (501 feet) southward on the preceding sol, reaching this location on the west side of Victoria Crater. View the maps of the traverse to this point.

Rover tracks from the Sol 1663 drive extend northward in this image. For scale, the two parallel tracks are about 1 meter (39 inches) apart. To the right of the tracks, Victoria Crater is visible from the north-northeast to the east-southeast.

This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (84 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
Full-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
View from West of Victoria Crater, Sol 1664 (Vertical)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,664th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (September 28, 2008). Opportunity had driven 152.8 meters (501 feet) southward on the preceding sol, reaching this location on the west side of Victoria Crater. View the maps of the traverse to this point.

Rover tracks from the Sol 1663 drive extend northward in this image. For scale, the two parallel tracks are about 1 meter (39 inches) apart. To the right of the tracks, Victoria Crater is visible from the north-northeast to the east-southeast.

This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (75 kB) | Large (1.1 MB)
Full-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)

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