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Press Release Images: Opportunity
15-Jul-2009
 
 
Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850
Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,850th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (April 7, 2009).

Opportunity had driven 62.5 meters (205 feet) that sol, southward away from an outcrop called "Penrhyn," which the rover had been examining for a few sols, and toward a crater called "Adventure." In preceding drives, the drive motor for the right-front wheel had been drawing more current than usual, so engineers drove Opportunuity backward on Sol 1950, a strategy to redistribute lubricant and reduce friction in the wheel.

North is in the center of the image; south at both ends. Opportunity's position on Sol 1850 was about 1.3 kilometers (0.8 mile) south-southwest of Victoria Crater. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (141 kB) | Large (987 kB)
Full Resolution (12.6 MB)
 
Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850 (Stereo)
Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,850th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (April 7, 2009). The view appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

Opportunity had driven 62.5 meters (205 feet) that sol, southward away from an outcrop called "Penrhyn," which the rover had been examining for a few sols, and toward a crater called "Adventure." In preceding drives, the drive motor for the right-front wheel had been drawing more current than usual, so engineers drove Opportunuity backward on Sol 1950, a strategy to redistribute lubricant and reduce friction in the wheel.

North is in the center of the image; south at both ends. Opportunity's position on Sol 1850 was about 1.3 kilometers (0.8 mile) south-southwest of Victoria Crater. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This panorama combines right-eye and left-eye views presented as cylindrical-perspective projections with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (170 kB) | Large (1.0 MB)
Full Resolution (48.5 MB)
 
Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850 (Left Eye)
Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850 (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,850th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (April 7, 2009).

Opportunity had driven 62.5 meters (205 feet) that sol, southward away from an outcrop called "Penrhyn," which the rover had been examining for a few sols, and toward a crater called "Adventure." In preceding drives, the drive motor for the right-front wheel had been drawing more current than usual, so engineers drove Opportunuity backward on Sol 1950, a strategy to redistribute lubricant and reduce friction in the wheel.

North is in the center of the image; south at both ends. Opportunity's position on Sol 1850 was about 1.3 kilometers (0.8 mile) south-southwest of Victoria Crater. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (165 kB) | Large (1.1 MB)
Full Resolution (16.2 MB)
 
Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850 (Right Eye)
Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850 (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,850th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (April 7, 2009).

Opportunity had driven 62.5 meters (205 feet) that sol, southward away from an outcrop called "Penrhyn," which the rover had been examining for a few sols, and toward a crater called "Adventure." In preceding drives, the drive motor for the right-front wheel had been drawing more current than usual, so engineers drove Opportunuity backward on Sol 1950, a strategy to redistribute lubricant and reduce friction in the wheel.

North is in the center of the image; south at both ends. Opportunity's position on Sol 1850 was about 1.3 kilometers (0.8 mile) south-southwest of Victoria Crater. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (158 kB) | Large (1.1 MB)
Full Resolution (16.2 MB)
Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850 (Polar)
Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850 (Polar)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,850th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (April 7, 2009).

Opportunity had driven 62.5 meters (205 feet) that sol, southward away from an outcrop called "Penrhyn," which the rover had been examining for a few sols, and toward a crater called "Adventure." In preceding drives, the drive motor for the right-front wheel had been drawing more current than usual, so engineers drove Opportunuity backward on Sol 1950, a strategy to redistribute lubricant and reduce friction in the wheel.

North is at the top of the image; south at the bottom. Opportunity's position on Sol 1850 was about 1.3 kilometers (0.8 mile) south-southwest of Victoria Crater. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (81 kB) | Large (1.1 MB)
Full Resolution (16.0 MB)
Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850 (Vertical)
Opportunity's Surroundings After Backwards Drive, Sol 1850 (Vertical)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,850th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (April 7, 2009).

Opportunity had driven 62.5 meters (205 feet) that sol, southward away from an outcrop called "Penrhyn," which the rover had been examining for a few sols, and toward a crater called "Adventure." In preceding drives, the drive motor for the right-front wheel had been drawing more current than usual, so engineers drove Opportunuity backward on Sol 1950, a strategy to redistribute lubricant and reduce friction in the wheel.

North is at the top of the image; south at the bottom. Opportunity's position on Sol 1850 was about 1.3 kilometers (0.8 mile) south-southwest of Victoria Crater. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (84 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
Full Resolution (15.3 MB)
 
Skirting an Obstacle, Opportunity's Sol 1867
Skirting an Obstacle, Opportunity's Sol 1867

This view from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows tracks left by backing out of a wind-formed ripple after the rover's wheels had started to dig too deeply into the dust and sand of the ripple.

The frames combined into this view were taken on the 1,867th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (April 25, 2009). The scene spans 120 degrees, from southeastward on the left to westward on the right.

Two sols earlier, Opportunity drove 94.55 meters (310 feet) south-southwestward before stopping when the rover detected that its wheels were slipping more than the limit that engineers had set for the drive. That Sol 1865 (April 23, 2009) drive created the tracks that enter this scene from the left and ended with wheels on the left side of the rover partially embedded in the ripple. On Sol 1866, Opportunity began to back away from this potential trap, but moved only about 28 centimeters (11 inches). On Sol 1867, the rover backed up 3.7 meters (12 feet) before taking this picture. Subsequently, Opportunity proceeded on a path avoiding the ripple where the wheel slippage occurred.

For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (347 kB) | Large (713 kB)
Full Resolution (7.8 MB)
 
Opportunity's View After 72-Meter Drive, Sol 1912
Opportunity's View After 72-Meter Drive, Sol 1912

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,912th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (June 10, 2009).

Opportunity had driven 72.3 meters southward (237 feet) that sol. Engineers drove the rover backward as a strategy to counteract an increase in the amount of current drawn by the drive motor of the right-front wheel.

North is in the center of the image; south at both ends. Opportunity's position on Sol 1912 was about 2.5 kilometers (1.6 miles) south-southwest of Victoria Crater. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (151 kB) | Large (1.1 MB)
Full Resolution (12.6 MB)
 
Opportunity's View After 72-Meter Drive, Sol 1912 (Stereo)
Opportunity's View After 72-Meter Drive, Sol 1912 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,912th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (June 10, 2009). The view appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

Opportunity had driven 72.3 meters southward (237 feet) that sol. Engineers drove the rover backward as a strategy to counteract an increase in the amount of current drawn by the drive motor of the right-front wheel.

North is in the center of the image; south at both ends. Opportunity's position on Sol 1912 was about 2.5 kilometers (1.6 mile) south-southwest of Victoria Crater. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This panorama combines right-eye and left-eye views presented as cylindrical-perspective projections with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (188 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
Full Resolution (48.5 MB)
 
Opportunity's View After 72-Meter Drive, Sol 1912 (Left Eye)
Opportunity's View After 72-Meter Drive, Sol 1912 (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,912th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (June 10, 2009).

Opportunity had driven 72.3 meters southward (237 feet) that sol. Engineers drove the rover backward as a strategy to counteract an increase in the amount of current drawn by the drive motor of the right-front wheel.

North is in the center of the image; south at both ends. Opportunity's position on Sol 1912 was about 2.5 kilometers (1.6 miles) south-southwest of Victoria Crater. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (178 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
Full Resolution (16.2 MB)
 
Opportunity's View After 72-Meter Drive, Sol 1912 (Right Eye)
Opportunity's View After 72-Meter Drive, Sol 1912 (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,912th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (June 10, 2009).

Opportunity had driven 72.3 meters southward (237 feet) that sol. Engineers drove the rover backward as a strategy to counteract an increase in the amount of current drawn by the drive motor of the right-front wheel.

North is in the center of the image; south at both ends. Opportunity's position on Sol 1912 was about 2.5 kilometers (1.6 miles) south-southwest of Victoria Crater. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (178 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
Full Resolution (16.2 MB)
Opportunity's View After 72-Meter Drive, Sol 1912 (Polar)
Opportunity's View After 72-Meter Drive, Sol 1912 (Polar)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,912th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (June 10, 2009).

Opportunity had driven 72.3 meters southward (237 feet) that sol. Engineers drove the rover backward as a strategy to counteract an increase in the amount of current drawn by the drive motor of the right-front wheel.

North is at the top of the image; south at the bottom. Opportunity's position on Sol 1912 was about 2.5 kilometers (1.6 miles) south-southwest of Victoria Crater. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (83 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
Full Resolution (16.0 MB)
Opportunity's View After 72-Meter Drive, Sol 1912 (Vertical)
Opportunity's View After 72-Meter Drive, Sol 1912 (Vertical)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,912th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (June 10, 2009).

Opportunity had driven 72.3 meters southward (237 feet) that sol. Engineers drove the rover backward as a strategy to counteract an increase in the amount of current drawn by the drive motor of the right-front wheel.

North is at the top of the image; south at the bottom. Opportunity's position on Sol 1912 was about 2.5 kilometers (1.6 miles) south-southwest of Victoria Crater. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (80 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
Full Resolution (15.3 MB)

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