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Press Release Images: Opportunity
19-Oct-2010
 
 
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive

This mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a 90-degree view centered toward the east following a 93.3-meter (306-foot) drive east-northeastward during the 2,382nd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Oct. 6, 2010).

The camera took the component images for this mosaic on Sol 2382 after the drive. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. On the following sol, Opportunity drove an additional 94.3 meters (309 feet) toward its long-term destination: the rim of Endeavour Crater. Portions of the rim, still more than 8 kilometers (5 miles) away, are visible in the horizon of this scene. This view is presented as a cylindrical projection.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Full Resolution (8.9 MB)
 
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive (Stereo)
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive (Stereo)

This stereo mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a 90-degree view centered toward the east following a 93.3-meter (306-foot) drive east-northeastward during the 2,382nd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Oct. 6, 2010). The view appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

The camera took the component images for this mosaic on Sol 2382 after the drive. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. On the following sol, Opportunity drove an additional 94.3 meters (309 feet) toward its long-term destination: the rim of Endeavour Crater. Portions of the rim, still more than 8 kilometers (5 miles) away, are visible in the horizon of this scene. This stereo view combines right-eye and left-eye views presented as cylindrical-perspective projections.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (409 kB) | Large (2.4 MB)
Full Resolution (8.9 MB)
 
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive (Left Eye)
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive (Left Eye)

This mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a 90-degree view centered toward the east following a 93.3-meter (306-foot) drive east-northeastward during the 2,382nd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Oct. 6, 2010).

The camera took the component images for this mosaic on Sol 2382 after the drive. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. On the following sol, Opportunity drove an additional 94.3 meters (309 feet) toward its long-term destination: the rim of Endeavour Crater. Portions of the rim, still more than 8 kilometers (5 miles) away, are visible in the horizon of this scene.

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (275 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
Full Resolution (2.98 MB)
 
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive (Right Eye)
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive (Right Eye)

This mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows surroundings of the rover's location following an 81-meter (266-foot) drive during the 2,363rd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Sept. 16, 2010).

The camera took the component images for this 360-degree panorama during sols 2363 to 2365. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks in the right half of the image is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (279 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
Full Resolution (2.98 MB)

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