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Press Release Images: Opportunity
08-Apl-2011
Mars Rover's 'Gagarin' Moment Applauded Exploration
Press Release
Opportunity's Arm and 'Gagarin' Rock, Sol 405
Opportunity's Arm and 'Gagarin' Rock, Sol 405

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its rock abrasion tool on a rock informally named "Gagarin" during the 401st and 402nd Martian days, or sols, of the rover's work on Mars (March 10 and 11, 2005). This image, taken by Opportunity's navigation camera on Sol 405 (March 14, 2005), shows the circular mark left on the rock. The circle is about 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter.

At the end of the rover's arm, the tool turret is positioned with the rock abrasion tool pointing upward in this image.

The abrasion target on the rock Gagarin was informally named "Yuri." A view taken by Opportunity's microscopic imager after the target was brushed by the rock abrasion tool is at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07480.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Exploration Rover Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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'Gagarin' Rock Examined by Opportunity in 2005, False Color
'Gagarin' Rock Examined by Opportunity in 2005, False Color

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its rock abrasion tool on a rock informally named "Gagarin" during the 401st and 402nd Martian days, or sols, of the rover's work on Mars (March 10 and 11, 2005). This false-color image shows the circular mark created where the tool exposed the interior of the rock Gagarin at a target called "Yuri." The circle is about 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter. Gagarin is at the edge of a highly eroded, small crater that was informally named "Vostok" for the spacecraft that carried Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin in the first human spaceflight, on April 12, 1961.

This image combines exposures taken through three different filters by Opportunity's panoramic camera on Sol 405 (March 14, 2005). The view is presented in false color to emphasize differences among materials in the rocks and the soils.

Images showing the context for the location of Vostok crater are at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07193 and http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07471.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Exploration Rover Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./ASU

Browse Image | Medium Image (380 kB) | Large (1.68 MB)
Full Resolution (2.86 MB)
'Gagarin' Rock Examined by Opportunity in 2005
'Gagarin' Rock Examined by Opportunity in 2005

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its rock abrasion tool on a rock informally named "Gagarin" during the 401st and 402nd Martian days, or sols, of the rover's work on Mars (March 10 and 11, 2005). This image shows the circular mark created where the tool exposed the interior of the rock Gagarin at a target called "Yuri." The circle is about 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter. Gagarin is at the edge of a highly eroded, small crater that was informally named "Vostok" for the spacecraft that carried Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin in the first human spaceflight, on April 12, 1961.

This image combines exposures taken through three different filters by Opportunity's panoramic camera on Sol 405 (March 14, 2005). The view is presented in approximately true color.

Images showing the context for the location of Vostok crater are at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07193 and http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA07471.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Exploration Rover Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./ASU

Browse Image | Medium Image (146 kB) | Large (760 kB)
Full Resolution (1.58 MB)

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