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Press Release Images: Opportunity
07-Sept-2012
  NASA Mars Exploration Rover Team To Be Honored
Press Release
Shadow Self-Portrait by Opportunity at Endeavour Crater
Shadow Self-Portrait by Opportunity at Endeavour Crater

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured this view of its afternoon shadow stretching into Endeavour Crater during the 3,051st Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars (Aug. 23, 2012).

The rover was perched on the western rim of the crater, which is 14 miles (22 kilometers) in diameter.

Opportunity's front hazard-avoidance camera took this image. The camera has a fisheye lens; the image has been processed to straighten the horizon. This view echoes one of the most popular images of Opportunity's long-lived mission, a shadow self-portrait (PIA06739) taken at Endurance Crater about eight years earlier.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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Outcrop Beckoning Opportunity, Sol 3057
Outcrop Beckoning Opportunity, Sol 3057

The team operating NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity plans to investigate rocks in this area photographed by the rover's navigation camera during the 3,057th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars (Aug. 23, 2012).  Both the dark fins and the paler outcrop beyond them hold potential targets for studying with instruments on the rover.  

Orbital investigation of the area has identified a possibility of clay minerals in this area of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.

This view is toward the west. A portion of the rover's solar array is in the foreground. Winds cleaned some of the accumulated dust from the array in June and July 2012.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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Opportunity's Surroundings on 3,000th Sol
Opportunity's Surroundings on 3,000th Sol

This 360-degree panorama assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exporation Rover Opportunity shows terrain surrounding the position where the rover spent its 3,000th Martian day, or sol, working on Mars (July 2, 2012). Opportunity completed its 90-sol prime mission in April 2004. It has continued to explore the Meridiani Planum region of Mars for more than eight years of bonus extended missions.

The Sol 3000 site is near the northern tip of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.  Bright toned material lines the perimeter of Cape York.

This panoramic view is centered to the south, with north at both ends. The component images were taken during sols 2989 through 2991.

Opportunity arrived at this location on Sol 2989 (June 20, 2012) with a drive bringing the mission's total driving distance as of Sol 3000 to 21.432 miles (34,492 meters). Here it examined a rock target called "Grasberg" with its microscopic imager and alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, both before and after grinding the surface off the target with the rover's rock abrasion tool.  Opportunity departed this location with an eastward drive of about 105 feet (32 meters) on Sol 3008 (July 10, 2012).

The scene is presented as a cylindrical projection in this image.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Opportunity's Surroundings on 3,000th Sol, in 3-D
Opportunity's Surroundings on 3,000th Sol, in 3-D

This 360-degree stereo panorama assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exporation Rover Opportunity shows terrain surrounding the position where the rover spent its 3,000th Martian day, or sol, working on Mars (July 2, 2012).

The scene appears three dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

Opportunity completed its 90-sol prime mission in April 2004. It has continued to explore the Meridiani Planum region of Mars for more than eight years of bonus extended missions.

The Sol 3000 site is near the northern tip of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.  Bright toned material lines the perimeter of Cape York.

This panoramic view is centered to the south, with north at both ends. The component images were taken during sols 2989 through 2991.

Opportunity arrived at this location on Sol 2989 (June 20, 2012) with a drive bringing the mission's total driving distance as of Sol 3000 to 21.432 miles (34,492 meters). Here it examined a rock target called "Grasberg" with its microscopic imager and alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, both before and after grinding the surface off the target with the rover's rock abrasion tool.  Opportunity departed this location with an eastward drive of about 105 feet (32 meters) on Sol 3008 (July 10, 2012).

The scene is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection in this image.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech


Stereo View
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Full Resolution (15 Mb)

Left View
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Right View
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Opportunity's Surroundings on 3,000th Sol, Polar Projection
Opportunity's Surroundings on 3,000th Sol, Polar Projection

This 360-degree scene assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exporation Rover Opportunity shows terrain surrounding the position where the rover spent its 3,000th Martian day, or sol, working on Mars (July 2, 2012).

The scene is presented as a polar projection in this image, with north at the top.

Opportunity completed its 90-sol prime mission in April 2004. It has continued to explore the Meridiani Planum region of Mars for more than eight years of bonus extended missions.

The Sol 3000 site is near the northern tip of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.  Bright toned material lines the perimeter of Cape York.

The component images of this scene were taken during sols 2989 through 2991. Opportunity arrived at this location on Sol 2989 (June 20, 2012) with a drive bringing the mission's total driving distance as of Sol 3000 to 21.432 miles (34,492 meters). It departed with an eastward drive of about 105 feet (32 meters) on Sol 3008 (July 10, 2012).

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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Opportunity's Surroundings on 3,000th Sol, Vertical Projection
Opportunity's Surroundings on 3,000th Sol, Vertical Projection

This 360-degree scene assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exporation Rover Opportunity shows terrain surrounding the position where the rover spent its 3,000th Martian day, or sol, working on Mars (July 2, 2012).

The scene is presented as a vertical projection in this image, with north at the top.

Opportunity completed its 90-sol prime mission in April 2004. It has continued to explore the Meridiani Planum region of Mars for more than eight years of bonus extended missions.

The Sol 3000 site is near the northern tip of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.  Bright toned material lines the perimeter of Cape York.

The component images of this scene were taken during sols 2989 through 2991. Opportunity arrived at this location on Sol 2989 (June 20, 2012) with a drive bringing the mission's total driving distance as of Sol 3000 to 21.432 miles (34,492 meters). It departed with an eastward drive of about 105 feet (32 meters) on Sol 3008 (July 10, 2012).

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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Opportunity Eyes Rock Fins on Cape York, Sol 3058 (Stereo)
Opportunity Eyes Rock Fins on Cape York, Sol 3058 (Stereo)

Rock fins up to about 1 foot (30 centimeters) tall dominate this stereo scene from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The component images were taken during the 3,058th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars (Aug. 23, 2012). 

This stereo mosaic combines views from the left eye and right eye of the Pancam to appear three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses.

The view spans an area of terrain about 30 feet (9 meters) wide. Orbital investigation of the area has identified a possibility of clay minerals in this area of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State Univ.
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Opportunity Eyes Rock Fins on Cape York, Sol 3058 (False Color)
Opportunity Eyes Rock Fins on Cape York, Sol 3058 (False Color)

Rock fins up to about about 1 foot (30 centimeters) tall dominate this scene from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The component images were taken during the 3,058th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars (Aug. 23, 2012).  The view spans an area of terrain about 30 feet (9 meters) wide.

Orbital investigation of the area has identified a possibility of clay minerals in this area of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater. This outcrop is within an area informally named "Matijevic Hill."

The view combines exposures taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet). It is presented in false color to make some differences between materials easier to see.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State Univ.
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Opportunity Eyes Rock Fins on Cape York, Sol 3058
Opportunity Eyes Rock Fins on Cape York, Sol 3058

Rock fins up to about 1 foot (30 centimeters) tall dominate this scene from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The component images were taken during the 3,058th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars (Aug. 23, 2012).  The view spans an area of terrain about 30 feet (9 meters) wide.

Orbital investigation of the area has identified a possibility of clay minerals in this area of the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater. This outcrop is within an area informally named "Matijevic Hill."

The view combines exposures taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers (near infrared), 535 nanometers (green) and 432 nanometers (violet). It is presented in approximate true color, the camera team's best estimate of what the scene would look like if humans were there and able to see it with their own eyes.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State Univ.
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Full Resolution (2.5 Mb)

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