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Press Release Images: Spirit
10-May-2004
 
Spirit Takes the Helm (Animation)
Spirit Takes the Helm

This animation shows Spirit driving itself through the rocky terrain of Gusev Crater on sol 118 (May 8, 2004) using its auto-navigation software. Halfway through the drive, the rover spotted a rock bigger than its wheels (25 centimeters or 9.8 inches) and drove around to the left. At the end of its traverse, Spirit encountered several more large rocks, but since they were less than half its wheel height (12 centimeters or 4.7 inches tall), it drove right over them. The total distance traveled was 92.7 meters (304 feet) -- Spirit's longest drive yet. Over half the drive (55 meters or 180 feet) was executed using the auto-navigation software.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS
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A Closer Look at the 'Columbia Hills'
A Closer Look at the 'Columbia Hills'

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image mosaic of the "Columbia Hills" at 4:15 p.m. local solar time on sol 122 (May 7, 2004). Spirit will spend the next 37 sols or more approaching the base of the highest peak seen in this image. Rover controllers and scientists are sending Spirit to this faraway location because the hills there are likely an older unit of rock and may provide insight into the past environment at Gusev Crater.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Tracks of Art
Tracks of Art

Spirit took this panoramic camera image of its wheel tracks on sol 122 (May 7, 2004). This short segment of track represents only a small portion of the long journey Spirit has traveled toward the base of the "Columbia Hills," which still loom approximately 1.7 kilometers (1 mile) away. The tracks will be only a temporary scar on this martian landscape, as winds will eventually wipe them away.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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