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Press Release Images: Spirit
14-Oct-2004
 
Layered Outcrops in Gusev Crater
Layered Outcrops in Gusev Crater

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit collected data on morphology, composition, and mineralogy of a rock nicknamed "Tetl" using the microscopic imager, the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, and the Mössbauer spectrometer before moving on. Scientists are discussing a suggestion that this rock outcrop and others on the "West Spur" of the "Columbia Hills" in Gusev Crater on Mars may contain evidence of graded bedding, in which alternate layers of sediment are either coarser or finer depending on the turbulence of the processes that deposited them. Such layers could be deposited by water circulating in rivers or lakes, volcanic ash settling on the surface, wind carrying fine-grained sediments, or a combination of these processes. This view is a mosaic of images that Spirit took with its microscopic imager on the rover's 272nd and 273rd martian days, or sols (Oct. 7 and 8, 2004). It has been enhanced to bring out details in the shadows without washing out sunlit areas. The section of rock shown here is approximately 17 centimeters (6.7 inches) wide.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS
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Layered outcrops in Gusev Crater
Layered outcrops in Gusev Crater

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired the images that went into this color composite with its panoramic camera around 1:00 p.m. martian time on its 270th martian day, or sol (Oct. 5, 2004). The view represents the panoramic-camera team's best current attempt at generating a "true color" view of what this scene would look like if viewed by a human on Mars. It was generated from a mathematical combination of six calibrated images acquired through filters for wavelengths between 430 nanometers and 750 nanometers.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Layered outcrops in Gusev Crater (False Color)
Layered outcrops in Gusev Crater (False Color)

One of the ways scientists collect mineralogical data about rocks on Mars is to view them through filters that allow only specific wavelengths of light to pass through the lens of the panoramic camera. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this false-color image of the rock nicknamed "Tetl" at 1:05 p.m. martian time on its 270th martian day, or sol (Oct. 5, 2004) using the panoramic camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters. Darker red hues in the image correspond to greater concentrations of oxidized soil and dust. Bluer hues correspond to portions of rock that are not as heavily coated with soils or are not as highly oxidized.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell
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