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Press Release Images: Spirit
06-Mar-2006
 
 
This image shows finely layered rocks interspersed with sand sloping downward and inward toward the center of the panorama from either side. Here and there on the outcrop, a chunk of rock has become displaced and lies at an angle on the surface. In the distance, in the center just beneath the orangish sky, is 'McCool Hill.' The sand is reddish brown and rocks covered with sand are red. Bare rock surfaces and edges are blue-gray.
'Gibson' Panorama by Spirit at 'Home Plate' (False Color)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired this high-resolution view of intricately layered exposures of rock while parked on the northwest edge of the bright, semi-circular feature known as "Home Plate." The rover was perched at a 27-degree upward tilt while creating the panorama, resulting in the "U" shape of the mosaic. In reality, the features along the 1-meter to 2-meter (3-foot to 6-foot) vertical exposure of the rim of Home Plate in this vicinity are relatively level. Rocks near the rover in this view, known as the "Gibson" panorama, include "Barnhill," "Rogan," and "Mackey."

Spirit took this panorama of 246 separate images using 6 different filters on the Pancam on martian days, or sols, 748-751 (Feb. 9-12, 2006). The field of view in this cylindrical projection covers 160 degrees of terrain from side to side. This image is a false-color rendering using using Pancam's 753-nanometer, 535-namometer, and 432-nanometer filters, but presented to enhance the many striking but subtle color differences between rocks and soils in the scene. Image-to-image seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Cornell
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This image shows finely layered rocks interspersed with sand sloping downward and inward toward the center of the panorama from either side. Here and there on the outcrop, a chunk of rock has become displaced and lies at an angle on the surface. In the distance, in the center just beneath the orangish sky, is 'McCool Hill.' All surfaces are reddish-brown.
'Gibson' Panorama by Spirit at 'Home Plate'

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired this high-resolution view of intricately layered exposures of rock while parked on the northwest edge of the bright, semi-circular feature known as "Home Plate." The rover was perched at a 27-degree upward tilt while creating the panorama, resulting in the "U" shape of the mosaic. In reality, the features along the 1-meter to 2-meter (3-foot to 6-foot) vertical exposure of the rim of Home Plate in this vicinity are relatively level. Rocks near the rover in this view, known as the "Gibson" panorama, include "Barnhill," "Rogan," and "Mackey."

Spirit took this panorama of 246 separate images using 6 different filters on the Pancam on martian days, or sols, 748-751 (Feb. 9-12, 2006). The field of view in this cylindrical projection covers 160 degrees of terrain from side to side. This image is an approximate true-color rendering using Pancam's 753-nanometer, 535-namometer, and 432-nanometer filters. Image-to-image seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Cornell
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This panorama shows two rock-strewn slopes on the left and right sides of a broad, U-shaped dip in the middle. The sandy surface in front of the rover is reddish brown; individual rocks and more distant features are blue-gray with occasional streaks of reddish-colored sand. In the distance are the broad slopes of 'McCool Hill.' Above that is an orangish-yellow sky. In the foreground, just in front of the rover, some of the panels of the image are missing and show up as black rectangular gaps at the lower front edge.
Spirit's 'Paige' Panorama of the Interior of 'Home Plate' (False Color)

On Feb. 19, 2006, the 758th Martian day of exploration of the red planet by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, the rover acquired this panoramic view of the interior of "Home Plate," a circular topographic feature amid the "Columbia Hills." This view, called the "Paige" panorama, is from the top of Home Plate. It shows layered rocks exposed at the edge as well as dark rocks exhibiting both smooth and sponge-like "scoriaceous" textures. To the east from this vantage point, "McCool Hill" looms on the horizon. At the base of McCool Hill is a reddish outcrop called "Oberth," which Spirit may explore during the rapidly approaching Martian winter. "Von Braun" and "Goddard" hills are partially visible beyond the opposite rim of Home Plate.

The limited spatial coverage of this panorama is the result of steadily decreasing power available to the rover for science activities as the Martian winter arrives and the sun traces a lower path across the sky. The rover team anticipates that the north-facing slopes of McCool Hill should sufficiently tilt the rover's solar panels toward the sun to allow Spirit to survive the winter.

This panorama consists of 72 separate images from 4 different Pancam filters, and covers about 230 degrees of terrain around the rover. The slightly upturned edges of the mosaic result from the rover's tilt of 17 degrees toward the interior of "Home Plate" when the images were acquired. This is a false-color rendering of a cylindrical projection using the Pancam's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters, enhanced to show the many striking but subtle color differences between rocks, soils, and hills in the scene. Image-to-image seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Cornell
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This panorama shows two reddish-brown, rock-strewn slopes on the left and right sides of a broad, U-shaped dip in the middle. In the distance are the broad slopes of 'McCool Hill.' Above that is an orangish-yellow sky. In the foreground, just in front of the rover, some of the panels of the image are missing and show up as black rectangular gaps at the lower front edge.
Spirit's 'Paige' Panorama of the Interior of 'Home Plate'

On Feb. 19, 2006, the 758th Martian day of exploration of the red planet by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, the rover acquired this panoramic view of the interior of "Home Plate," a circular topographic feature amid the "Columbia Hills." This view, called the "Paige" panorama, is from the top of Home Plate. It shows layered rocks exposed at the edge as well as dark rocks exhibiting both smooth and sponge-like "scoriaceous" textures. To the east from this vantage point, "McCool Hill" looms on the horizon. At the base of McCool Hill is a reddish outcrop called "Oberth," which Spirit may explore during the rapidly approaching Martian winter. "Von Braun" and "Goddard" hills are partially visible beyond the opposite rim of Home Plate.

The limited spatial coverage of this panorama is the result of steadily decreasing power available to the rover for science activities as the Martian winter arrives and the sun traces a lower path across the sky. The rover team anticipates that the north-facing slopes of McCool Hill should sufficiently tilt the rover's solar panels toward the sun to allow Spirit to survive the winter.

This panorama consists of 72 separate images from 4 different Pancam filters, and covers about 230 degrees of terrain around the rover. The slightly upturned edges of the mosaic result from the rover's tilt of 17 degrees toward the interior of "Home Plate" when the images were acquired. This is an approximate true-color rendering of a cylindrical projection using the Pancam's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters. Image-to-image seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Cornell
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This image shows two flat-topped, layered rocks with angular edges almost side by side, except they are separated by a smaller rock and two thin channels of reddish-brown sand. The bare rock surfaces are a light blue-gray. The circular areas ground by the Rock Abrasion Tool are a deep, bright blue. Other layered rocks in the image have light blue-gray surfaces; most notable is a horizontal rock at the bottom of the image centered beneath and below the two  dark circles. In between are various flat rocks and reddish sand. Smaller rocks have wind shadows tha streak from left to right.
Studies Rock Outcrop at 'Home Plate'

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired this false-color image at 11:48 local true solar time on Mars on the rover's 746th Martian day, or sol (Feb. 26, 2006), after using the rock abraision tool to brush the surfaces of rock targets informally named "Stars" (left) and "Crawfords" (right). Small streaks of dust extend for several centimeters behind the small rock chips and pebbles in the dusty, red soils. Because the rover was looking southwest when this image was taken, the wind streaks indicate that the dominant wind direction was from the southeast.

The targets Stars and Crawfords are on a rock outcrop located on top of "Home Plate." The outcrop is informally named "James 'Cool Papa' Bell," after a Negro Leagues Hall of Famer who played for both the Pittsburgh Crawfords and the Kansas City Stars. To some science team members, the two brushed spots resemble the eyes of a face, with rocks below and between the eyes as a nose and layered rocks at the bottom of the image as a mouth.

The image combines frames taken by Spirit's panoramic camera through the camera's 753-nanometer, 535-namometer, and 432-nanometer filters. It is enhanced to emphasize color differences among the rocks, soils and brushed areas. The blue circular area on the left, Stars, was brushed on 761 (Feb. 22, 2006). The one on the right, Crawfords, was brushed on sol 763 (Feb. 25, 2006).

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/USGS/Cornell
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