Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology Follow this link to skip to the main content
Images
Press Release Images
Spirit
Opportunity
All Raw Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Panoramas
Spirit
Opportunity
3-D Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Spacecraft
Mars Artwork
Landing Sites
Press Release Images: Spirit
05-May-2006
 
This image shows a sandy, reddish slope rising from the lower left to upper right, topped by a scattering of gray to black rocks pockmarked with tiny holes called vesicles. Close to the rover, near the lower front edge of the image, is one of the largest boulders. The side of the boulder facing the rover is crisscrossed by a network of undulating, elongated cavities as well as smaller vesicles. In the distance beyond the slope, forming the horizon, is another slope rising from right to left.
Spirit Beholds Bumpy Boulder (False Color)

As NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit began collecting images for a 360-degree panorama of new terrain, the rover captured this view of a dark boulder with an interesting surface texture. The boulder sits about 40 centimeters (16 inches) tall on Martian sand about 5 meters (16 feet) away from Spirit. It is one of many dark, volcanic rock fragments -- many pocked with rounded holes called vesicles -- littering the slope of "Low Ridge." The rock surface facing the rover is similar in appearance to the surface texture on the outside of lava flows on Earth.

Spirit took this false-color image with the panoramic camera on the rover's 810th sol, or Martian day, of exploring Mars (April 13, 2006). This image is a false-color rendering using camera's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/NMMNH
Browse Image | Medium Image (214 kB) | Large (1.5 MB)
This image shows a sandy, reddish-brown slope rising from the lower left to upper right, topped by a scattering of gray to black rocks pockmarked with tiny holes called vesicles. Close to the rover, near the lower front edge of the image, is one of the largest boulders. The side of the boulder facing the rover is crisscrossed by a network of undulating, elongated cavities as well as smaller vesicles. In the distance beyond the slope, forming the horizon, is another slope rising from right to left.
Spirit Beholds Bumpy Boulder

As NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit began collecting images for a 360-degree panorama of new terrain, the rover captured this view of a dark boulder with an interesting surface texture. The boulder sits about 40 centimeters (16 inches) tall on Martian sand about 5 meters (16 feet) away from Spirit. It is one of many dark, volcanic rock fragments -- many pocked with rounded holes called vesicles -- littering the slope of "Low Ridge." The rock surface facing the rover is similar in appearance to the surface texture on the outside of lava flows on Earth.

Spirit took this approximately true-color image with the panoramic camera on the rover's 810th sol, or Martian day, of exploring Mars (April 13, 2006), using the camera's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/NMMNH
Browse Image | Medium Image (200 kB) | Large (1.4 MB)

JPL Image Use Policy

USA.gov
PRIVACY   I   IMAGE POLICY   I   FAQ   I   SITEMAP   I   CREDITS