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Press Release Images: Spirit
03-Apr-2009
 
 
Spirit's View Beside 'Home Plate' on Sol 1823
Spirit's View Beside 'Home Plate' on Sol 1823

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images that have been combined into this 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,823rd Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's surface mission (Feb. 17, 2009).

The center of the view is toward the south-southwest.

The rover had driven 7 meters (23 feet) eastward earlier on Sol 1823, part of maneuvering to get Spirit into a favorable position for climbing onto the low plateau called "Home Plate." However, after two driving attempts with negligible progress during the following three sols, the rover team changed its strategy for getting to destinations south of Home Plate. The team decided to drive Spirit at least partway around Home Plate, instead of ascending the northern edge and taking a shorter route across the top of the plateau.

Layered rocks forming part of the northern edge of Home Plate can be seen near the center of the image. Rover wheel tracks are visible at the lower edge.

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (290 kB) | Large (508 kB)
Full Resolution (4.0 MB)
 
Spirit's View Beside 'Home Plate' on Sol 1823 (Stereo)
Spirit's View Beside 'Home Plate' on Sol 1823 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images that have been combined into this stereo, 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,823rd Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's surface mission (Feb. 17, 2009).

This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

The center of the view is toward the south-southwest.

The rover had driven 7 meters (23 feet) eastward earlier on Sol 1823, part of maneuvering to get Spirit into a favorable position for climbing onto the low plateau called "Home Plate." However, after two driving attempts with negligible progress during the following three sols, the rover team changed its strategy for getting to destinations south of Home Plate. The team decided to drive Spirit at least partway around Home Plate, instead of ascending the northern edge and taking a shorter route across the top of the plateau.

Layered rocks forming part of the northern edge of Home Plate can be seen near the center of the image. Rover wheel tracks are visible at the lower edge.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (324 kB) | Large (578 kB)
Full Resolution (14.7 MB)
 
Spirit's View Beside 'Home Plate' on Sol 1823 (Left Eye)
Spirit's View Beside 'Home Plate' on Sol 1823 (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images that have been combined into this 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,823rd Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's surface mission (Feb. 17, 2009).

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

The center of the view is toward the south-southwest.

The rover had driven 7 meters (23 feet) eastward earlier on Sol 1823, part of maneuvering to get Spirit into a favorable position for climbing onto the low plateau called "Home Plate." However, after two driving attempts with negligible progress during the following three sols, the rover team changed its strategy for getting to destinations south of Home Plate. The team decided to drive Spirit at least partway around Home Plate, instead of ascending the northern edge and taking a shorter route across the top of the plateau.

Layered rocks forming part of the northern edge of Home Plate can be seen near the center of the image. Rover wheel tracks are visible at the lower edge.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (307 kB) | Large (553 kB)
Full Resolution (4.9 MB)
 
Spirit's View Beside 'Home Plate' on Sol 1823 (Right Eye)
Spirit's View Beside 'Home Plate' on Sol 1823 (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images that have been combined into this 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,823rd Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's surface mission (Feb. 17, 2009).

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

The center of the view is toward the south-southwest.

The rover had driven 7 meters (23 feet) eastward earlier on Sol 1823, part of maneuvering to get Spirit into a favorable position for climbing onto the low plateau called "Home Plate." However, after two driving attempts with negligible progress during the following three sols, the rover team changed its strategy for getting to destinations south of Home Plate. The team decided to drive Spirit at least partway around Home Plate, instead of ascending the northern edge and taking a shorter route across the top of the plateau.

Layered rocks forming part of the northern edge of Home Plate can be seen near the center of the image. Rover wheel tracks are visible at the lower edge.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (292 kB) | Large (527 kB)
Full Resolution (4.9 MB)
 
Time for a Change; Spirit's View on Sol 1843
Time for a Change; Spirit's View on Sol 1843

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images that have been combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,843rd Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's surface mission (March 10, 2009). South is in the middle. North is at both ends.

The rover had driven 36 centimeters downhill earlier on Sol 1854, but had not been able to get free of ruts in soft material that had become an obstacle to getting around the northeastern corner of the low plateau called "Home Plate."

The Sol 1854 drive, following two others in the preceding four sols that also achieved little progress in the soft ground, prompted the rover team to switch to a plan of getting around Home Plate counterclockwise, instead of clockwise. The drive direction in subsequent sols was westward past the northern edge of Home Plate.

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (181 kB) | Large (961 kB)
Full Resolution (7.0 MB)
 
Time for a Change; Spirit's View on Sol 1843 (Stereo)
Time for a Change; Spirit's View on Sol 1843 (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images that have been combined into this stereo, full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,843rd Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's surface mission (March 10, 2009). South is in the middle. North is at both ends.

This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

The rover had driven 36 centimeters downhill earlier on Sol 1854, but had not been able to get free of ruts in soft material that had become an obstacle to getting around the northeastern corner of the low plateau called "Home Plate."

The Sol 1854 drive, following two others in the preceding four sols that also achieved little progress in the soft ground, prompted the rover team to switch to a plan of getting around Home Plate counterclockwise, instead of clockwise. The drive direction in subsequent sols was westward past the northern edge of Home Plate.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (204 kB) | Large (1.0 MB)
Full Resolution (25.7 MB)
 
Time for a Change; Spirit's View on Sol 1843 (Left Eye)
Time for a Change; Spirit's View on Sol 1843 (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images that have been combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,843rd Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's surface mission (March 10, 2009). South is in the middle. North is at both ends.

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

The rover had driven 36 centimeters downhill earlier on Sol 1854, but had not been able to get free of ruts in soft material that had become an obstacle to getting around the northeastern corner of the low plateau called "Home Plate."

The Sol 1854 drive, following two others in the preceding four sols that also achieved little progress in the soft ground, prompted the rover team to switch to a plan of getting around Home Plate counterclockwise, instead of clockwise. The drive direction in subsequent sols was westward past the northern edge of Home Plate.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (203 kB) | Large (1.0 MB)
Full Resolution (8.6 MB)
 
Time for a Change; Spirit's View on Sol 1843 (Right Eye)
Time for a Change; Spirit's View on Sol 1843 (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images that have been combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,843rd Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's surface mission (March 10, 2009). South is in the middle. North is at both ends.

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

The rover had driven 36 centimeters downhill earlier on Sol 1854, but had not been able to get free of ruts in soft material that had become an obstacle to getting around the northeastern corner of the low plateau called "Home Plate."

The Sol 1854 drive, following two others in the preceding four sols that also achieved little progress in the soft ground, prompted the rover team to switch to a plan of getting around Home Plate counterclockwise, instead of clockwise. The drive direction in subsequent sols was westward past the northern edge of Home Plate.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (192 kB) | Large (999 kB)
Full Resolution (8.6 MB)
Time for a Change; Spirit's View on Sol 1843 (Polar)
Time for a Change; Spirit's View on Sol 1843 (Polar)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images that have been combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,843rd Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's surface mission (March 10, 2009).

This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

The rover had driven 36 centimeters downhill earlier on Sol 1854, but had not been able to get free of ruts in soft material that had become an obstacle to getting around the northeastern corner of the low plateau called "Home Plate."

The Sol 1854 drive, following two others in the preceding four sols that also achieved little progress in the soft ground, prompted the rover team to switch to a plan of getting around Home Plate counterclockwise, instead of clockwise. The drive direction in subsequent sols was westward past the northern edge of Home Plate.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (118 kB) | Large (1.3 MB)
Full Resolution (15.6 MB)
Time for a Change; Spirit's View on Sol 1843 (Vertical)
Time for a Change; Spirit's View on Sol 1843 (Vertical)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images that have been combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,843rd Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's surface mission (March 10, 2009).

This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

The rover had driven 36 centimeters downhill earlier on Sol 1854, but had not been able to get free of ruts in soft material that had become an obstacle to getting around the northeastern corner of the low plateau called "Home Plate."

The Sol 1854 drive, following two others in the preceding four sols that also achieved little progress in the soft ground, prompted the rover team to switch to a plan of getting around Home Plate counterclockwise, instead of clockwise. The drive direction in subsequent sols was westward past the northern edge of Home Plate.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (156 kB) | Large (1.6 MB)
Full Resolution (15.3 MB)
 
View Ahead After Spirit's Sol 1861 Drive
View Ahead After Spirit's Sol 1861 Drive

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 210-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,861st to 1,863rd Martian days, or sols, of Spirit's surface mission (March 28 to 30, 2009).

The center of the scene is toward the south-southwest. East is on the left. West-northwest is on the right.

The rover had driven 22.7 meters (74 feet) southwestward on Sol 1861 before beginning to take the frames in this view. The drive brought Spirit past the northwestern corner of Home Plate.

In this view, the western edge of Home Plate is on the portion of the horizon farthest to the left. A mound in middle distance near the center of the view is called "Tsiolkovsky" and is about 40 meters (about 130 feet) from the rover's position.

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (224 kB) | Large (546 kB)
Full Resolution (4.7 MB)
 
View Ahead After Spirit's Sol 1861 Drive (Stereo)
View Ahead After Spirit's Sol 1861 Drive (Stereo)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, 210-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,861st to 1,863rd Martian days, or sols, of Spirit's surface mission (March 28 to 30, 2009).

This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

The center of the scene is toward the south-southwest. East is on the left. West-northwest is on the right.

The rover had driven 22.7 meters (74 feet) southwestward on Sol 1861 before beginning to take the frames in this view. The drive brought Spirit past the northwestern corner of Home Plate.

In this view, the western edge of Home Plate is on the portion of the horizon farthest to the left. A mound in middle distance near the center of the view is called "Tsiolkovsky" and is about 40 meters (about 130 feet) from the rover's position.

This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (240 kB) | Large (619 kB)
Full Resolution (17.2 MB)
 
View Ahead After Spirit's Sol 1861 Drive (Left Eye)
View Ahead After Spirit's Sol 1861 Drive (Left Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 210-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,861st to 1,863rd Martian days, or sols, of Spirit's surface mission (March 28 to 30, 2009).

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

The center of the scene is toward the south-southwest. East is on the left. West-northwest is on the right.

The rover had driven 22.7 meters (74 feet) southwestward on Sol 1861 before beginning to take the frames in this view. The drive brought Spirit past the northwestern corner of Home Plate.

In this view, the western edge of Home Plate is on the portion of the horizon farthest to the left. A mound in middle distance near the center of the view is called "Tsiolkovsky" and is about 40 meters (about 130 feet) from the rover's position.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (230 kB) | Large (600 kB)
Full Resolution (5.7 MB)
 
View Ahead After Spirit's Sol 1861 Drive (Right Eye)
View Ahead After Spirit's Sol 1861 Drive (Right Eye)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 210-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,861st to 1,863rd Martian days, or sols, of Spirit's surface mission (March 28 to 30, 2009).

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

The center of the scene is toward the south-southwest. East is on the left. West-northwest is on the right.

The rover had driven 22.7 meters (74 feet) southwestward on Sol 1861 before beginning to take the frames in this view. The drive brought Spirit past the northwestern corner of Home Plate.

In this view, the western edge of Home Plate is on the portion of the horizon farthest to the left. A mound in middle distance near the center of the view is called "Tsiolkovsky" and is about 40 meters (about 130 feet) from the rover's position.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (226 kB) | Large (583 kB)
Full Resolution (5.7 MB)

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