Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology Follow this link to skip to the main content
Images
Press Release Images
Spirit
Opportunity
All Raw Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Panoramas
Spirit
Opportunity
3-D Images
Spirit
Opportunity
Spacecraft
Mars Artwork
Landing Sites
Press Release Images: Spirit
16-Jul-2009
 
 
Spirit's Look Ahead After Sol 1866 Drive

This scene combines three frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,866th Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 3, 2009). It spans 120 degrees, with south at the center.

Spirit had driven 3 meters (10 feet) southward earlier in the day. The foreground of this view includes terrain that the rover covered in its next drive, when it progressed 17.5 meters (57 feet) farther southward on Sol 1868 (April 5, 2009).

In the middle distance, the western edge of the low plateau called "Home Plate" is on the left and a ridge called "Tsiolkovsky" is on the right, with the rover's planned route between the two. By Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009) Spirit became embedded at a site dubbed "Troy," about as far south as the northern end of Tsiolkovsky.

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (291 kB) | Large (322 kB)
Full Resolution (2.7 MB)
 
Spirit's Look Ahead After Sol 1866 Drive (Stereo)

This stereo scene combines frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,866th Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 3, 2009). It spans 120 degrees, with south at the center. The view appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

Spirit had driven 3 meters (10 feet) southward earlier in the day. The foreground of this view includes terrain that the rover covered in its next drive, when it progressed 17.5 meters (57 feet) farther southward on Sol 1868 (April 5, 2009).

In the middle distance, the western edge of the low plateau called "Home Plate" is on the left and a ridge called "Tsiolkovsky" is on the right, with the rover's planned route between the two. By Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009) Spirit became embedded at a site dubbed "Troy," about as far south as the northern end of Tsiolkovsky.

This scene combines right-eye and left-eye views presented as cylindrical-perspective projections with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (348 kB) | Large (366 kB)
Full Resolution (9.9 MB)
 
Spirit's Look Ahead After Sol 1866 Drive (Left Eye)

This scene combines three frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,866th Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 3, 2009). It spans 120 degrees, with south at the center.

Spirit had driven 3 meters (10 feet) southward earlier in the day. The foreground of this view includes terrain that the rover covered in its next drive, when it progressed 17.5 meters (57 feet) farther southward on Sol 1868 (April 5, 2009).

In the middle distance, the western edge of the low plateau called "Home Plate" is on the left and a ridge called "Tsiolkovsky" is on the right, with the rover's planned route between the two. By Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009) Spirit became embedded at a site dubbed "Troy," about as far south as the northern end of Tsiolkovsky.

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (329 kB) | Large (361 kB)
Full Resolution (3.3 MB)
 
Spirit's Look Ahead After Sol 1866 Drive (Right Eye)

This scene combines three frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,866th Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 3, 2009). It spans 120 degrees, with south at the center.

Spirit had driven 3 meters (10 feet) southward earlier in the day. The foreground of this view includes terrain that the rover covered in its next drive, when it progressed 17.5 meters (57 feet) farther southward on Sol 1868 (April 5, 2009).

In the middle distance, the western edge of the low plateau called "Home Plate" is on the left and a ridge called "Tsiolkovsky" is on the right, with the rover's planned route between the two. By Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009) Spirit became embedded at a site dubbed "Troy," about as far south as the northern end of Tsiolkovsky.

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (311 kB) | Large (340 kB)
Full Resolution (3.3 MB)
 
Spirit's Look Ahead on Sol 1869

This scene combines three frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,869th Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 6, 2009). It spans 120 degrees, with south at the center.

The view is from the position Spirit reached with a 17.5-meter (57-foot) southward drive on the preceding sol. The foreground includes terrain that the rover covered in its next two drives, when it traveled 12.7 meters (42 feet) southward on Sol 1870 (April 7, 2009) and an additional 7 meters (23 feet) on Sol 1871 (April 8, 2009).

On the far left of the image is the slope of the western edge of the low plateau called "Home Plate." On the right, in the middle distance, is a ridge called "Tsiolkovsky." Behind the saddle between Home Plate and Tsiolkovsky is a mound capped with light-toned rock and called "Von Braun," a possible destination for Spirit to investigate in the future.

Spirit was driving toward Von Braun when the rover became embedded in soft soil at a site called "Troy" by Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009). The soft soil at Troy was covered with a darker layer before Spirit's wheels broke through that top layer and revealed lighter material, so the site is inconspicuous in the middle distance toward Von Braun in this image.

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (337 kB) | Large (371 kB)
Full Resolution (2.6 MB)
 
Spirit's Look Ahead on Sol 1869 (Stereo)

This stereo scene combines frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,869th Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 6, 2009). It spans 120 degrees, with south at the center. The view appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

The view is from the position Spirit reached with a 17.5-meter (57-foot) southward drive on the preceding sol. The foreground includes terrain that the rover covered in its next two drives, when it traveled 12.7 meters (42 feet) southward on Sol 1870 (April 7, 2009) and an additional 7 meters (23 feet) on Sol 1871 (April 8, 2009).

On the far left of the image is the slope of the western edge of the low plateau called "Home Plate." On the right, in the middle distance, is a ridge called "Tsiolkovsky." Behind the saddle between Home Plate and Tsiolkovsky is a mound capped with light-toned rock and called "Von Braun," a possible destination for Spirit to investigate in the future.

Spirit was driving toward Von Braun when the rover became embedded in soft soil at a site called "Troy" by Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009). The soft soil at Troy was covered with a darker layer before Spirit's wheels broke through that top layer and revealed lighter material, so the site is inconspicuous in the middle distance toward Von Braun in this image.

This scene combines right-eye and left-eye views presented as cylindrical-perspective projections with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (420 kB) | Large (430 kB)
Full Resolution (9.7 MB)
 
Spirit's Look Ahead on Sol 1869 (Left Eye)

This scene combines three frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,869th Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 6, 2009). It spans 120 degrees, with south at the center.

The view is from the position Spirit reached with a 17.5-meter (57-foot) southward drive on the preceding sol. The foreground includes terrain that the rover covered in its next two drives, when it traveled 12.7 meters (42 feet) southward on Sol 1870 (April 7, 2009) and an additional 7 meters (23 feet) on Sol 1871 (April 8, 2009).

On the far left of the image is the slope of the western edge of the low plateau called "Home Plate." On the right, in the middle distance, is a ridge called "Tsiolkovsky." Behind the saddle between Home Plate and Tsiolkovsky is a mound capped with light-toned rock and called "Von Braun," a possible destination for Spirit to investigate in the future.

Spirit was driving toward Von Braun when the rover became embedded in soft soil at a site called "Troy" by Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009). The soft soil at Troy was covered with a darker layer before Spirit's wheels broke through that top layer and revealed lighter material, so the site is inconspicuous in the middle distance toward Von Braun in this image.

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (383 kB) | Large (404 kB)
Full Resolution (3.2 MB)
 
Spirit's Look Ahead on Sol 1869 (Right Eye)

This scene combines three frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,869th Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 6, 2009). It spans 120 degrees, with south at the center.

The view is from the position Spirit reached with a 17.5-meter (57-foot) southward drive on the preceding sol. The foreground includes terrain that the rover covered in its next two drives, when it traveled 12.7 meters (42 feet) southward on Sol 1870 (April 7, 2009) and an additional 7 meters (23 feet) on Sol 1871 (April 8, 2009).

On the far left of the image is the slope of the western edge of the low plateau called "Home Plate." On the right, in the middle distance, is a ridge called "Tsiolkovsky." Behind the saddle between Home Plate and Tsiolkovsky is a mound capped with light-toned rock and called "Von Braun," a possible destination for Spirit to investigate in the future.

Spirit was driving toward Von Braun when the rover became embedded in soft soil at a site called "Troy" by Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009). The soft soil at Troy was covered with a darker layer before Spirit's wheels broke through that top layer and revealed lighter material, so the site is inconspicuous in the middle distance toward Von Braun in this image.

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (364 kB) | Large (384 kB)
Full Resolution (3.2 MB)
 
Spirit Close to "Troy," Sol 1871

This scene combines five frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,871st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 8, 2009). It spans 180 degrees, with east on the left, south at the center and west on the right.

This view is from the position Spirit reached with a drive of 7 meters (23 feet) southeastward earlier on Sol 1871. The drive brought Spirit to within about 2 meters (7 feet) of the location, subsequently dubbed "Troy," where it would begin to become embedded after its next drive. Other issues, including an amnesia-like event and unexplained computer resets, resulted in no driving attempts after Sol 1871 until Sol 1886 (April 23, 2009).

The western edge of the low plateau called "Home Plate" appears on the left side of this view. A ridge informally named "Tsiolkovsky" is on the right. Behind the saddle between Home Plate and Tsiolkovsky is a mound capped with light-toned rock and called "Von Braun," a possible destination for Spirit to investigate in the future.

Spirit was driving toward Von Braun when the rover became embedded in soft soil at a site called "Troy" by Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009). The soft soil at Troy was covered with a darker layer before Spirit's wheels broke through that top layer and revealed lighter material.

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (340 kB) | Large (594 kB)
Full Resolution (4.4 MB)
 
Spirit Close to "Troy," Sol 1871 (Stereo)

This stereo scene combines frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,871st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 8, 2009). It spans 180 degrees, with east on the left, south at the center and west on the right. The view appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

This view is from the position Spirit reached with a drive of 7 meters (23 feet) southeastward earlier on Sol 1871. The drive brought Spirit to within about 2 meters (7 feet) of the location, subsequently dubbed "Troy," where it would begin to become embedded after its next drive. Other issues, including an amnesia-like event and unexplained computer resets, resulted in no driving attempts after Sol 1871 until Sol 1886 (April 23, 2009).

The western edge of the low plateau called "Home Plate" appears on the left side of this view. A ridge informally named "Tsiolkovsky" is on the right. Behind the saddle between Home Plate and Tsiolkovsky is a mound capped with light-toned rock and called "Von Braun," a possible destination for Spirit to investigate in the future.

Spirit was driving toward Von Braun when the rover became embedded in soft soil at a site called "Troy" by Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009). The soft soil at Troy was covered with a darker layer before Spirit's wheels broke through that top layer and revealed lighter material.

This scene combines right-eye and left-eye views presented as cylindrical-perspective projections with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (388 kB) | Large (684 kB)
Full Resolution (16.3 MB)
 
Spirit Close to "Troy," Sol 1871 (Left Eye)

This scene combines five frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,871st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 8, 2009). It spans 180 degrees, with east on the left, south at the center and west on the right.

This view is from the position Spirit reached with a drive of 7 meters (23 feet) southeastward earlier on Sol 1871. The drive brought Spirit to within about 2 meters (7 feet) of the location, subsequently dubbed "Troy," where it would begin to become embedded after its next drive. Other issues, including an amnesia-like event and unexplained computer resets, resulted in no driving attempts after Sol 1871 until Sol 1886 (April 23, 2009).

The western edge of the low plateau called "Home Plate" appears on the left side of this view. A ridge informally named "Tsiolkovsky" is on the right. Behind the saddle between Home Plate and Tsiolkovsky is a mound capped with light-toned rock and called "Von Braun," a possible destination for Spirit to investigate in the future.

Spirit was driving toward Von Braun when the rover became embedded in soft soil at a site called "Troy" by Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009). The soft soil at Troy was covered with a darker layer before Spirit's wheels broke through that top layer and revealed lighter material.

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (366 kB) | Large (656 kB)
Full Resolution (5.4 MB)
 
Spirit Close to "Troy," Sol 1871 (Right Eye)

This scene combines five frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,871st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 8, 2009). It spans 180 degrees, with east on the left, south at the center and west on the right.

This view is from the position Spirit reached with a drive of 7 meters (23 feet) southeastward earlier on Sol 1871. The drive brought Spirit to within about 2 meters (7 feet) of the location, subsequently dubbed "Troy," where it would begin to become embedded after its next drive. Other issues, including an amnesia-like event and unexplained computer resets, resulted in no driving attempts after Sol 1871 until Sol 1886 (April 23, 2009).

The western edge of the low plateau called "Home Plate" appears on the left side of this view. A ridge informally named "Tsiolkovsky" is on the right. Behind the saddle between Home Plate and Tsiolkovsky is a mound capped with light-toned rock and called "Von Braun," a possible destination for Spirit to investigate in the future.

Spirit was driving toward Von Braun when the rover became embedded in soft soil at a site called "Troy" by Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009). The soft soil at Troy was covered with a darker layer before Spirit's wheels broke through that top layer and revealed lighter material.

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (354 kB) | Large (629 kB)
Full Resolution (5.4 MB)
 
Spirit's View from "Troy"

This scene combines seven frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,891st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 28, 2009). It covers a vista from south-southeast on the left to northeast on the right.

This view is from the position Spirit reached with a drive that moved the rover only about 14 centimeters (5.5 inches) earlier on Sol 1891. Spirit's wheels had started to sink into local soil on Sol 1886 (April 23, 2009). After Sol 1891, the rover team attempted five more drives with Spirit through Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009), moving the rover only a few centimeters in all, and detecting wheel slippage in excess of 99 percent before deciding to suspend further driving by Spirit until potential maneuvers had been thoroughly evaluated with a test rover on Earth.

The site from which Spirit obtained this view has been informally named "Troy." Layers of differently hued soil uncovered by the sinking wheels became the subject of intense analysis by the instruments on Spirit's robotic arm.

On the horizon at the left edge of this view is a mound capped with light-toned rock and called "Von Braun," a possible destination for Spirit to investigate in the future. Between Von Braun and the center of the image is a ridge called "Tsiolkovsky." The hill on the horizon to the right is Husband Hill, where Spirit reached the summit in 2005. Tracks receding toward the north were created as Spirit drove southward toward Troy, driving backward and dragging its right-front wheel, which has been inoperable for more than three years. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (218 kB) | Large (712 kB)
Full Resolution (5.8 MB)
 
Spirit's View from "Troy" (Stereo)

This stereo scene combines frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,891st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 28, 2009). It covers a vista from south-southeast on the left to northeast on the right. The view appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

This view is from the position Spirit reached with a drive that moved the rover only about 14 centimeters (5.5 inches) earlier on Sol 1891. Spirit's wheels had started to sink into local soil on Sol 1886 (April 23, 2009). After Sol 1891, the rover team attempted five more drives with Spirit through Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009), moving the rover only a few centimeters in all, and detecting wheel slippage in excess of 99 percent before deciding to suspend further driving by Spirit until potential maneuvers had been thoroughly evaluated with a test rover on Earth.

The site from which Spirit obtained this view has been informally named "Troy." Layers of differently hued soil uncovered by the sinking wheels became the subject of intense analysis by the instruments on Spirit's robotic arm.

On the horizon at the left edge of this view is a mound capped with light-toned rock and called "Von Braun," a possible destination for Spirit to investigate in the future. Between Von Braun and the center of the image is a ridge called "Tsiolkovsky." The hill on the horizon to the right is Husband Hill, where Spirit reached the summit in 2005. Tracks receding toward the north were created as Spirit drove southward toward Troy, driving backward and dragging its right-front wheel, which has been inoperable for more than three years. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This panorama combines right-eye and left-eye views presented as cylindrical-perspective projections with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (243 kB) | Large (813 kB)
Full Resolution (21.4 MB)
 
Spirit's View from "Troy" (Left Eye)

This scene combines seven frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,891st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 28, 2009). It covers a vista from south-southeast on the left to northeast on the right.

This view is from the position Spirit reached with a drive that moved the rover only about 14 centimeters (5.5 inches) earlier on Sol 1891. Spirit's wheels had started to sink into local soil on Sol 1886 (April 23, 2009). After Sol 1891, the rover team attempted five more drives with Spirit through Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009), moving the rover only a few centimeters in all, and detecting wheel slippage in excess of 99 percent before deciding to suspend further driving by Spirit until potential maneuvers had been thoroughly evaluated with a test rover on Earth.

The site from which Spirit obtained this view has been informally named "Troy." Layers of differently hued soil uncovered by the sinking wheels became the subject of intense analysis by the instruments on Spirit's robotic arm.

On the horizon at the left edge of this view is a mound capped with light-toned rock and called "Von Braun," a possible destination for Spirit to investigate in the future. Between Von Braun and the center of the image is a ridge called "Tsiolkovsky." The hill on the horizon to the right is Husband Hill, where Spirit reached the summit in 2005. Tracks receding toward the north were created as Spirit drove southward toward Troy, driving backward and dragging its right-front wheel, which has been inoperable for more than three years. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (236 kB) | Large (794 kB)
Full Resolution (7.1 MB)
 
Spirit's View from "Troy" (Right Eye)

This scene combines seven frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the 1,891st Martian day, or sol, of Spirit's mission on Mars (April 28, 2009). It covers a vista from south-southeast on the left to northeast on the right.

This view is from the position Spirit reached with a drive that moved the rover only about 14 centimeters (5.5 inches) earlier on Sol 1891. Spirit's wheels had started to sink into local soil on Sol 1886 (April 23, 2009). After Sol 1891, the rover team attempted five more drives with Spirit through Sol 1899 (May 6, 2009), moving the rover only a few centimeters in all, and detecting wheel slippage in excess of 99 percent before deciding to suspend further driving by Spirit until potential maneuvers had been thoroughly evaluated with a test rover on Earth.

The site from which Spirit obtained this view has been informally named "Troy." Layers of differently hued soil uncovered by the sinking wheels became the subject of intense analysis by the instruments on Spirit's robotic arm.

On the horizon at the left edge of this view is a mound capped with light-toned rock and called "Von Braun," a possible destination for Spirit to investigate in the future. Between Von Braun and the center of the image is a ridge called "Tsiolkovsky." The hill on the horizon to the right is Husband Hill, where Spirit reached the summit in 2005. Tracks receding toward the north were created as Spirit drove southward toward Troy, driving backward and dragging its right-front wheel, which has been inoperable for more than three years. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (228 kB) | Large (766 kB)
Full Resolution (7.1 MB)

JPL Image Use Policy

USA.gov
PRIVACY   I   IMAGE POLICY   I   FAQ   I   SITEMAP   I   CREDITS