Panoramas: Opportunity

23-Dec-2010
Opportunity Studying a Football-Field Size Crater
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'Santa Maria' Crater in 360-Degree View, Sol 2451
'Santa Maria' Crater in 360-Degree View, Sol 2451

A football-field-size crater, informally named "Santa Maria," dominates the scene in this 360-degree view from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity.

Following a 25-meter (82-foot) drive on the 2,451st Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Dec. 16, 2010), Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the frames combined into this mosaic. South is at the center. North is at both ends. The view is presented as a cylindrical projection.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Exploration Rover Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

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'Santa Maria' Crater in 360-Degree View, Sol 2451 (Stereo)
'Santa Maria' Crater in 360-Degree View, Sol 2451 (Stereo)

A football-field-size crater, informally named "Santa Maria," dominates the scene in this 360-degree, stereo view from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity.

Following a 25-meter (82-foot) drive on the 2,451st Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Dec. 16, 2010), Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the frames combined into this mosaic. The scene appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left. It combines images taken with the left eye and right eye of the navigation camera.

South is at the center. North is at both ends. The view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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'Santa Maria' Crater in 360-Degree View, Sol 2451 (Left Eye)
'Santa Maria' Crater in 360-Degree View, Sol 2451 (Left Eye)

A football-field-size crater, informally named "Santa Maria," dominates the scene in this 360-degree view from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity.

Following a 25-meter (82-foot) drive on the 2,451st Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Dec. 16, 2010), Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the frames combined into this mosaic. This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection. South is at the center. North is at both ends.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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'Santa Maria' Crater in 360-Degree View, Sol 2451 (Right Eye)
'Santa Maria' Crater in 360-Degree View, Sol 2451 (Right Eye)

A football-field-size crater, informally named "Santa Maria," dominates the scene in this 360-degree view from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity.

Following a 25-meter (82-foot) drive on the 2,451st Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Dec. 16, 2010), Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the frames combined into this mosaic. This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection. South is at the center. North is at both ends.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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16-Dec-2010
NASA Spacecraft Provides Travel Tips for Mars Rover
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Opportunity's View of Santa Maria Crater, Sol 2450
Opportunity's View of Santa Maria Crater, Sol 2450

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to record this view of Santa Maria crater at the end of a drive during the 2,450th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Dec. 15, 2010). The drive brought Opportunity to the western edge of this crater, and this view is eastward across the crater.

Santa Maria crater is about 90 meters (295 feet) in diameter. The rover team plans to spend a few weeks investigating this crater before resuming Opportunity's long-term trek toward Endurance Crater.

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Rim of Endeavour on Opportunity's Horizon, Sol 2424
Rim of Endeavour on Opportunity's Horizon, Sol 2424

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its panoramic camera to record this eastward view of the horizon on the 2,424th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Nov. 18, 2010).

Portions of the rim of Endeavour Crater, several kilometers or miles in the distance, are visible at the left, middle and far-right of the image, rising above the Meridiani plain. Endeavour Crater is about 22 kilometers (14 miles) in diameter. The portion of the rim visible on the left in this image is at the northern edge of Endeavour. The portion in the middle of the image is on the crater's eastern edge of the crater. The portion at the far right is on the Endeavour's western rim, closer to Opportunity. An orbital view at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11837 offers context.

The rover team chose Endeavour Crater as a long-term destination for Opportunity in mid-2008, after the rover had investigated the much-smaller Victoria Crater for two years. More than a year later, the goal became even more alluring when observations with the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars, on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, found clay minerals exposed on Endeavour's western rim. James Wray of Cornell University, and co-authors, reported observations of those minerals in Geophysical Research Letters in 2009. Clay minerals, which form under wet and relatively neutral pH conditions, have been found extensively on Mars from orbit but have not been examined on the surface. Additional observations with that spectrometer are helping the rover team choose which part of Endeavour's rim to visit first with Opportunity.

This view is presented in approximately true color by combining exposures taken through three of the panoramic camera's filters, admitting wavelengths of 752 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers.

Opportunity completed its three-month prime mission in April 2004 and has continued working in mission extensions since then.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University
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Rim of Endeavour on Opportunity's Horizon, Sol 2424 (False Color)
Rim of Endeavour on Opportunity's Horizon, Sol 2424 (False Color)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its panoramic camera to record this eastward view of the horizon on the 2,424th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Nov. 18, 2010).

Portions of the rim of Endeavour Crater, several kilometers or miles in the distance, are visible at the left, middle and far-right of the image, rising above the Meridiani plain. Endeavour Crater is about 22 kilometers (14 miles) in diameter. The portion of the rim visible on the left in this image is at the northern edge of Endeavour. The portion in the middle of the image is on the crater's eastern edge of the crater. The portion at the far right is on the Endeavour's western rim, closer to Opportunity. An orbital view at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11837 offers context.

The rover team chose Endeavour Crater as a long-term destination for Opportunity in mid-2008, after the rover had investigated the much-smaller Victoria Crater for two years. More than a year later, the goal became even more alluring when observations with the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars, on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, found clay minerals exposed on Endeavour's western rim. James Wray of Cornell University, and co-authors, reported observations of those minerals in Geophysical Research Letters in 2009. Clay minerals, which form under wet and relatively neutral pH conditions, have been found extensively on Mars from orbit but have not been examined on the surface. Additional observations with that spectrometer are helping the rover team choose which part of Endeavour's rim to visit first with Opportunity.

This view combines exposures taken through three filters of the panoramic camera (Pancam) admitting wavelengths of 752 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers.

Opportunity completed its three-month prime mission in April 2004 and has continued working in mission extensions since then.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University
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East Rim of Endeavour Crater in Opportunity's View, Sol 2407
East Rim of Endeavour Crater in Opportunity's View, Sol 2407

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its panoramic camera to record this eastward horizon view on the 2,407th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Oct. 31, 2010).

A portion of Endeavour Crater's eastern rim, nearly 30 kilometers (19 miles) in the distance, is visible over the Meridiani plain. Endeavour is about 22 kilometers (14 miles) in diameter. The rover team chose Endeavour Crater as a long-term destination for Opportunity in mid-2008, after the rover had investigated the much-smaller Victoria Crater for two years. The rover is headed for a portion of Endeavour's western rim not visible in this image.

This view is presented in approximately true color by combining exposures taken through three filters of the panoramic camera (Pancam) admitting wavelengths of 752 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers.

Opportunity completed its three-month prime mission in April 2004 and has continued working in mission extensions since then.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University
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East Rim of Endeavour Crater in Opportunity's View, Sol 2407
East Rim of Endeavour Crater in Opportunity's View, Sol 2407

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its panoramic camera to record this eastward horizon view on the 2,407th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Oct. 31, 2010). The view is presented in false color to make differences in surface materials more visible.

A portion of Endeavour Crater's eastern rim, nearly 30 kilometers (19 miles) in the distance, is visible over the Meridiani plain. Endeavour is about 22 kilometers (14 miles) in diameter. The rover team chose Endeavour Crater as a long-term destination for Opportunity in mid-2008, after the rover had investigated the much-smaller Victoria Crater for two years. The rover is headed for a portion of Endeavour's western rim not visible in this image.

This view combines exposures taken through three filters of the panoramic camera (Pancam) admitting wavelengths of 752 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers.

Opportunity completed its three-month prime mission in April 2004 and has continued working in mission extensions since then.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University
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Super-Resolution View of Cape Tribulation, Sol 2298
Super-Resolution View of Cape Tribulation, Sol 2298

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its panoramic camera in a super-resolution technique to record this eastward view of the horizon on the 2,298th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (July 11, 2010).

Rising highest above the horizon in the right half of the image is a portion of the western rim of Endeavour Crater including a ridge informally named "Cape Tribulation" (see Fig. 1).

Super-resolution is an imaging technique combining information from multiple pictures of the same target in order to generate an image with a higher resolution than any of the individual images.

Endeavour Crater is about 22 kilometers (14 miles) in diameter. The rover team chose Endeavour as a long-term destination for Opportunity in mid-2008, after the rover had investigated the much-smaller Victoria Crater for two years. More than a year later, observations by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter revealed clay minerals on Endeavour's western rim, making the destination even more enticing for Opportunity's investigation. Cape Tribulation is one location where the clay minerals are exposed.

Opportunity completed its three-month prime mission in April 2004 and has continued working in mission extensions since then.

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Labeled - Figure 1
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18-Nov-2010
NASA Mars Rover Images Honor Apollo 12
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'Intrepid' Crater on Mars (Color)
'Intrepid' Crater on Mars (Color)

"Intrepid" crater on Mars carries the name of the lunar module of NASA's Apollo 12 mission, which landed on Earth's moon Nov. 19, 1969. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity recorded this view of the crater during the 2,417th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Nov. 11, 2010).

This view is presented in approximately true color, combining exposures taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) through three filters admitting wavelengths of 752 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers. Intrepid crater is about 20 meters (66 feet) in diameter. That is about the same size as the crater where Opportunity spent its first two months on Mars: Eagle crater. The rover's look-back image into Eagle crater after driving out of it in 2004 is at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05755.

The rover science team uses a convention of assigning the names of historic ships of exploration as the informal names for craters seen by Opportunity. Apollo 12's lunar module Intrepid carried astronauts Alan Bean and Pete Conrad to the surface of Earth's moon while crewmate Dick Gordon orbited overhead in the mission's command and service module, Yankee Clipper. A view of Bean next to Intrepid on the moon is online at http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/apollo/apollo12/html/as12-46-6749.html. An image of Conrad inspecting robotic lander Surveyor 3, with Intrepid on the lunar horizon nearby, is online at http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/apollo/apollo12/html/as12-48-7133.html.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University
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'Intrepid' Crater on Mars (False Color)
'Intrepid' Crater on Mars (False Color)

"Intrepid" crater on Mars carries the name of the lunar module of NASA's Apollo 12 mission, which landed on Earth's moon Nov. 19, 1969. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity recorded this view of the crater during the 2,417th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Nov. 11, 2010).

This view is presented in false color to make differences in surface materials more visible. It combines exposures taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) through three filters admitting wavelengths of 752 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers. Intrepid crater is about 20 meters (66 feet) in diameter. That is about the same size as the crater where Opportunity spent its first two months on Mars: Eagle crater. The rover's look-back image into Eagle crater after driving out of it in 2004 is at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05755.

The rover science team uses a convention of assigning the names of historic ships of exploration as the informal names for craters seen by Opportunity. Apollo 12's lunar module Intrepid carried astronauts Alan Bean and Pete Conrad to the surface of Earth's moon while crewmate Dick Gordon orbited overhead in the mission's command and service module, Yankee Clipper. A view of Bean next to Intrepid on the moon is online at http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/apollo/apollo12/html/as12-46-6749.html. An image of Conrad inspecting robotic lander Surveyor 3, with Intrepid on the lunar horizon nearby, is online at http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/apollo/apollo12/html/as12-48-7133.html.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University
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'Yankee Clipper' Crater on Mars (Stereo)
'Yankee Clipper' Crater on Mars (Stereo)

"Yankee Clipper" crater on Mars carries the name of the command and service module of NASA's 1969 Apollo 12 mission to the moon. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity recorded this stereo view of the crater during a pause in a 102-meter (365-foot) drive during the 2,410th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Nov. 4, 2010).

The scene appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left. It combines images taken with the left eye and right eye of Opportunity's navigation camera.

Yankee Clipper crater is about 10 meters (33 feet) in diameter.

The rover science team uses a convention of assigning the names of historic ships of exploration as the informal names for craters seen by Opportunity. Apollo 12's Yankee Clipper orbited Earth's moon while the mission's lunar module carried two astronauts to the lunar surface on Nov. 19, 1969, and later brought all three of the mission's astronauts back to Earth, arriving Nov. 24, 1969. A dramatic view of Earth rising over a lunar horizon, taken from Apollo 12's Yankee Clipper, is online at http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/apollo/apollo12/html/as12-47-6891.html.

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'Yankee Clipper' Crater on Mars (Left Eye)
'Yankee Clipper' Crater on Mars (Left Eye)

"Yankee Clipper" crater on Mars carries the name of the command and service module of NASA's 1969 Apollo 12 mission to the moon. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity recorded this stereo view of the crater during a pause in a 102-meter (365-foot) drive during the 2,410th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Nov. 4, 2010).

This view is a mosaic of three frames taken by the left eye of Opportunity's navigation camera. Yankee Clipper crater is about 10 meters (33 feet) in diameter.

The rover science team uses a convention of assigning the names of historic ships of exploration as the informal names for craters seen by Opportunity. Apollo 12's Yankee Clipper orbited Earth's moon while the mission's lunar module carried two astronauts to the lunar surface on Nov. 19, 1969, and later brought all three of the mission's astronauts back to Earth, arriving Nov. 24, 1969. A dramatic view of Earth rising over a lunar horizon, taken from Apollo 12's Yankee Clipper, is online at http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/apollo/apollo12/html/as12-47-6891.html.

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'Yankee Clipper' Crater on Mars (Right Eye)
'Yankee Clipper' Crater on Mars (Right Eye)

"Yankee Clipper" crater on Mars carries the name of the command and service module of NASA's 1969 Apollo 12 mission to the moon. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity recorded this stereo view of the crater during a pause in a 102-meter (365-foot) drive during the 2,410th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Nov. 4, 2010).

This view is a mosaic of three frames taken by the right eye of Opportunity's navigation camera. Yankee Clipper crater is about 10 meters (33 feet) in diameter.

The rover science team uses a convention of assigning the names of historic ships of exploration as the informal names for craters seen by Opportunity. Apollo 12's Yankee Clipper orbited Earth's moon while the mission's lunar module carried two astronauts to the lunar surface on Nov. 19, 1969, and later brought all three of the mission's astronauts back to Earth, arriving Nov. 24, 1969. A dramatic view of Earth rising over a lunar horizon, taken from Apollo 12's Yankee Clipper, is online at http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/apollo/apollo12/html/as12-47-6891.html.

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12-Nov-2010
 
 
'Intrepid' Crater on Opportunity's Martian Trek
'Intrepid' Crater on Opportunity's Martian Trek

This view of "Intrepid" crater, about 20 meters (66 feet) in diameter, is a mosaic of images taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The view spans 180 degrees and is centered toward the east.

Opportunity approached the crater with a 36.4-meter (119-foot) drive during the 2,415th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars (Nov. 9, 2010), and then took the component images of this scene on the same sol.

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2401 Drive
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2401 Drive

This mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a 90-degree view centered toward the east following a 122.2-meter (401-foot) drive east-northeastward during the 2,401st Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Oct. 25, 2010).

The camera took the component images for this mosaic on Sol 2401 after the drive. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. On the following sol, Opportunity drove an additional 93.6 meters (307 feet) toward its long-term destination: the rim of Endeavour Crater. Portions of the rim, still more than 8 kilometers (5 miles) away, are visible in the horizon of this scene.

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2401 Drive (Stereo)
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2401 Drive (Stereo)

This mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a 90-degree view centered toward the east following a 122.2-meter (401-foot) drive east-northeastward during the 2,401st Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Oct. 25, 2010).

The camera took the component images for this mosaic on Sol 2401 after the drive. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. On the following sol, Opportunity drove an additional 93.6 meters (307 feet) toward its long-term destination: the rim of Endeavour Crater. Portions of the rim, still more than 8 kilometers (5 miles) away, are visible in the horizon of this scene.

This panorama combines right-eye and left-eye views presented as cylindrical-perspective projections.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2401 Drive (Left Eye)
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2401 Drive (Left Eye)

This mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a 90-degree view centered toward the east following a 122.2-meter (401-foot) drive east-northeastward during the 2,401st Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Oct. 25, 2010).

The camera took the component images for this mosaic on Sol 2401 after the drive. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. On the following sol, Opportunity drove an additional 93.6 meters (307 feet) toward its long-term destination: the rim of Endeavour Crater. Portions of the rim, still more than 8 kilometers (5 miles) away, are visible in the horizon of this scene.

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2401 Drive (Right Eye)
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2401 Drive (Right Eye)

This mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a 90-degree view centered toward the east following a 122.2-meter (401-foot) drive east-northeastward during the 2,401st Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Oct. 25, 2010).

The camera took the component images for this mosaic on Sol 2401 after the drive. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. On the following sol, Opportunity drove an additional 93.6 meters (307 feet) toward its long-term destination: the rim of Endeavour Crater. Portions of the rim, still more than 8 kilometers (5 miles) away, are visible in the horizon of this scene.

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 2393 Drive
Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 2393 Drive

This mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows surroundings of the rover's location following an 100.7-meter (330-foot) drive during the 2,393rd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Oct. 17, 2010). South is at the center; north at both ends.

The camera took the component images for this 360-degree panorama during sols 2393 and 2394. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks in the right half of the image is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is presented as a cylindrical projection.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 2393 Drive (Stereo)
Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 2393 Drive (Stereo)

This mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows surroundings of the rover's location following an 100.7-meter (330-foot) drive during the 2,393rd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Oct. 17, 2010). South is at the center; north at both ends.

The camera took the component images for this 360-degree panorama during sols 2393 and 2394. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks in the right half of the image is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This panorama combines right-eye and left-eye views presented as cylindrical-perspective projections.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 2393 Drive (Left Eye)
Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 2393 Drive (Left Eye)

This mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows surroundings of the rover's location following an 100.7-meter (330-foot) drive during the 2,393rd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Oct. 17, 2010). South is at the center; north at both ends.

The camera took the component images for this 360-degree panorama during sols 2393 and 2394. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks in the right half of the image is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Full Resolution (8.4 MB)
 
Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 2393 Drive (Right Eye)
Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 2393 Drive (Right Eye)

This mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows surroundings of the rover's location following an 100.7-meter (330-foot) drive during the 2,393rd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Oct. 17, 2010). South is at the center; north at both ends.

The camera took the component images for this 360-degree panorama during sols 2393 and 2394. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks in the right half of the image is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Full Resolution (8.4 MB)
19-Oct-2010
 
 
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive

This mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a 90-degree view centered toward the east following a 93.3-meter (306-foot) drive east-northeastward during the 2,382nd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Oct. 6, 2010).

The camera took the component images for this mosaic on Sol 2382 after the drive. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. On the following sol, Opportunity drove an additional 94.3 meters (309 feet) toward its long-term destination: the rim of Endeavour Crater. Portions of the rim, still more than 8 kilometers (5 miles) away, are visible in the horizon of this scene. This view is presented as a cylindrical projection.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive (Stereo)
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive (Stereo)

This stereo mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a 90-degree view centered toward the east following a 93.3-meter (306-foot) drive east-northeastward during the 2,382nd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Oct. 6, 2010). The view appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

The camera took the component images for this mosaic on Sol 2382 after the drive. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. On the following sol, Opportunity drove an additional 94.3 meters (309 feet) toward its long-term destination: the rim of Endeavour Crater. Portions of the rim, still more than 8 kilometers (5 miles) away, are visible in the horizon of this scene. This stereo view combines right-eye and left-eye views presented as cylindrical-perspective projections.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Full Resolution (8.9 MB)
 
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive (Left Eye)
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive (Left Eye)

This mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a 90-degree view centered toward the east following a 93.3-meter (306-foot) drive east-northeastward during the 2,382nd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Oct. 6, 2010).

The camera took the component images for this mosaic on Sol 2382 after the drive. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. On the following sol, Opportunity drove an additional 94.3 meters (309 feet) toward its long-term destination: the rim of Endeavour Crater. Portions of the rim, still more than 8 kilometers (5 miles) away, are visible in the horizon of this scene.

This view is the left-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
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Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive (Right Eye)
Opportunity's Eastward View After Sol 2382 Drive (Right Eye)

This mosaic of images from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows surroundings of the rover's location following an 81-meter (266-foot) drive during the 2,363rd Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (Sept. 16, 2010).

The camera took the component images for this 360-degree panorama during sols 2363 to 2365. The terrain includes light-toned bedrock and darker ripples of wind-blown sand. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks in the right half of the image is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

This view is the right-eye member of a stereo pair, presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Browse Image | Medium Image (279 kB) | Large (1.2 MB)
Full Resolution (2.98 MB)