Curiosity Mission Updates

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) on Sol 1662 Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL
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MSL drove about 24 meters on Sol 1662, and another drive is planned for Sol 1664. Before the drive, lots of targeted remote sensing is planned: ChemCam and Right Mastcam will observe a bright rock named "Peaks Island," an exposure of bedding dubbed "Great Wass Island," a sand ripple called "Baldpate Mountain," and an interesting rock that was selected by AEGIS after the Sol 1662 drive, now named "Chebeague Island." Mastcam will also acquire a stereo mosaic of outcrops toward the south, in the direction of the planned drive.

Planning is restricted this week, so two sols were planned today. Untargeted remote sensing planned for Sol 1665 includes passive (no laser) ChemCam sky observations and two ground LIBS targets selected using the AEGIS software. Navcam will then search for dust devils and clouds before the rover rests in preparation for Wednesday's plan.

Dates of planned rover activities described in these reports are subject to change due to a variety of factors related to the Martian environment, communication relays and rover status.

About this Blog
These blog updates are provided by self-selected Mars Science Laboratory mission team members who love to share what Curiosity is doing with the public.

Dates of planned rover activities described in these reports are subject to change due to a variety of factors related to the Martian environment, communication relays and rover status.

Contributors
Tools on the
Curiosity Rover
The Curiosity rover has tools to study clues about past and present environmental conditions on Mars, including whether conditions have ever been favorable for microbial life. The rover carries:

Cameras

Spectrometers

Radiation Detectors

Environmental Sensors

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