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Curiosity Mission Updates

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Front Hazard Avoidance Cameras (Front Hazcams) on Sol 2284 Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Our onboard instruments SAM (Sample Analysis at Mars) and CheMin (Chemistry and Mineralogy) have come to the end of their investigation of the Rock Hall target, likely to be our last drill location on the Vera Rubin Ridge, so this 2-sol plan is the beginning of the drill operation wrap up. On the first sol (2286) SAM will "doggie bag" some sample, saving it for further experimentation in future weeks. The second sol of the plan (2287) will centre on preparations to "dump" the remaining sample from the drill onto the ground in the weekend plan, so that it can be analyzed by APXS, MAHLI, Mastcam and ChemCam. For example, Mastcam will image the Rock Hall drill hole, to monitor the degree of movement of the drill fines in the 3 weeks since our drilling.

The Geology (GEO) theme group planned ChemCam LIBS observations on four targets within the workspace. "Deveron" is a typical bedrock target, to help further characterize the bedrock in this area. "Burra" has an interesting pitted texture, whilst "Braeriach" has a shiny appearance. "Gometra" is a potential iron meteorite, which has been previously targeted, but warranted further investigation. Mastcam will take colour images of the LIBS targets, in addition to remote sensing of the "Greenheugh" pediment, further up the slopes of Mount Sharp. The Environment (ENV) theme group is continuing to document dust levels in the atmosphere, via a Mastcam sky column activity, and a full tau/extinction pair of images. Additionally, DAN passives and standard REMS activities are throughout the plan.

About this Blog
These blog updates are provided by self-selected Mars Science Laboratory mission team members who love to share what Curiosity is doing with the public.

Dates of planned rover activities described in these reports are subject to change due to a variety of factors related to the Martian environment, communication relays and rover status.

Contributors
Tools on the
Curiosity Rover
The Curiosity rover has tools to study clues about past and present environmental conditions on Mars, including whether conditions have ever been favorable for microbial life. The rover carries:

Cameras

Spectrometers

Radiation Detectors

Environmental Sensors

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