Mars    Helicopter

Status Updates

Flight 35 Preview – By the Numbers
This image was taken by the Perseverance rover with the Mars Helicopter Ingenuity on the surface of Mars at the location,
Ingenuity at Airfield D: This image of NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter was taken by the Mastcam-Z instrument of the Perseverance rover on June 15, 2021, the 114th Martian day, or sol, of the mission. The location, "Airfield D" (the fourth airfield), is just east of the "Séítah" geologic unit. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS. Download image ›
Flight number: 35 Date of flight: NET Dec. 3 Flight duration: 52.22 seconds Horizontal flight distance: 50 feet (15 meters)  Flight speed (horizontal): 10.0 fps (3.0 mps) Max flight altitude: 46 feet (14 meters) Flight goal: Reposition helicopter
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Flight 34 Was Short But Significant
This image was taken by the Perseverance rover with the Mars Helicopter Ingenuity on the surface of Mars at the location,
Mars Helicopter Sol 625 - Navigation Camera: NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter acquired this image using its navigation camera. This camera is mounted in the helicopter's fuselage and pointed directly downward to track the ground during flight. This image was acquired on Nov. 23, 2022 (Sol 625 of the Perseverance rover mission) at the local mean solar time of 16:39:52. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech. Download image ›
Compared to some of the other flights this past year, Flight 34 might not stand out. Even shorter than Ingenuity’s first flight, yesterday’s successful 18-second flight simply popped up to a little over 16 feet (5 meters), hovered, then landed. Despite the flight’s simple nature, the team is very excited because of what it means for the future of Ingenuity. Over the past few weeks, the opera...
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Mars Helicopters - The 4R's
This image was taken by the Perseverance rover with the Mars Helicopter Ingenuity on the surface of Mars at the location,

NASA's Mars Helicopters: Present, Future, and Proposed: A family portrait of Mars helicopters - Ingenuity, Sample Recovery Helicopter, and a future Mars Science Helicopter concept. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech. Download image ›

A Perspective from Bob Balaram, Chief Engineer "Emeritus" Ingenuity Project  Bob Balaram is the originator of NASA’s Ingenuity Mars helicopter and served as its Chief Engineer through the entire formulation, design, development and test phases. He oversaw the assembly of this first-of-a-kind aircraft and integration onto the Perseverance rover, and shepherded Ingenuity through its first year...
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Flight 34 Preview – By the Numbers
This image was taken by the Perseverance rover with the Mars Helicopter Ingenuity on the surface of Mars at the location,
Mastcam-Z Gives Ingenuity a Close-up: NASA’s Ingenuity Mars helicopter is seen here in a close-up taken by Mastcam-Z, a pair of zoomable cameras aboard the Perseverance rover. This image was taken on April 5, the 45th Martian day, or sol, of the mission. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU. Download image ›
Flight number: 34 Date of flight: NET Nov. 10 Flight duration: 18.6 seconds Horizontal flight distance: 0 feet (0 meters)  Flight speed (horizontal): 0.0 fps (0.0 mps) Flight altitude: 16 feet (5 meters) Flight goal: test flight – hover only
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Foreign Object Debris Seen During Helicopter's 33rd Flight
This image was taken by the Perseverance rover with the Mars Helicopter Ingenuity on the surface of Mars at the location,
Navigation Camera Imagery of Ingenuity's Flight 33: A small piece of foreign object debris (FOD) is seen in footage from the navigation camera of NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter during its 33rd flight on Mars on Sept 24, 2022. The FOD is seen attached to one of the rotorcraft's landing legs, then drifting away. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech. Download image ›
A small piece of foreign object debris (FOD) was seen in footage from the Mars helicopter’s navigation camera (Navcam) for a portion of its 33rd flight. This FOD was not visible in Navcam footage from the previous flight (32). The FOD is seen in Flight 33 Navcam imagery from the earliest frames to approximately halfway through the video, when it fell from the leg and drifted back to the Mars su...
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Flight 33 Preview – By the Numbers
This image was taken by the Perseverance rover with the Mars Helicopter Ingenuity on the surface of Mars at the location,
Ingenuity's First Flight Recorded by Mastcam-Z: The first flight of NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter – and the first powered, controlled flight on another planet – was captured in this image from Mastcam-Z, a pair of zoomable cameras aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover, on April 19, 2021. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU. Download image ›
Flight number – 33 No earlier than Sol 567, Saturday, Sept. 24 Heading – West Max Altitude – 33 feet (10 meters) Expected Distance – ~365 feet (111.238 meters) Expected Airspeed – 10.6 mph (4.75 m/s) Expected Time Aloft – 55.61 seconds Goal of Flight: Reposition of the helicopter
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Flight 31 Preview – By the Numbers
This image was taken by the Perseverance rover with the Mars Helicopter Ingenuity on the surface of Mars at the location,
Mastcam-Z Gives Ingenuity a Close-up: NASA’s Ingenuity Mars helicopter is seen here in a close-up taken by Mastcam-Z, a pair of zoomable cameras aboard the Perseverance rover. This image was taken on April 5, the 45th Martian day, or sol, of the mission. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU. Download image ›
Flight number - 31 No earlier than date of flight – Tuesday, September 6 Altitude – 33 feet (10 meters) Airspeed – 10.6 mph (4.75 m/s) Heading - West Distance – 319 feet (97 meters) Time Aloft – 56 seconds Goal - Reposition helicopter
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Ingenuity Team Spun Up for Upcoming Flight 30
This image was taken by the Perseverance rover with the Mars Helicopter Ingenuity on the surface of Mars at the location,

Ingenuity at Airfield D: This image of NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter was taken by the Mastcam-Z instrument of the Perseverance rover on June 15, 2021, the 114th Martian day, or sol, of the mission. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS. Download image ›

It’s been over a month since we last updated our blog about our winter warrior, currently around 96 million miles away. At present the team is preparing for Ingenuity’s next flight, which could take place as early as this weekend. This 30th sortie will be a short hop – which will check out our system’s health after surviving 101 sols of winter, collect landing delivery data in support of NASA’s...
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Ingenuity Postpones Flights Until August
This image was taken by the Perseverance rover with the Mars Helicopter Ingenuity on the surface of Mars at the location,
Ingenuity's First Flight Recorded by Mastcam-Z: The first flight of NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter – and the first powered, controlled flight on another planet – was captured in this image from Mastcam-Z, a pair of zoomable cameras aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover, on April 19, 2021. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU. Download image ›
It’s now dust season and winter on Mars, meaning there’s more dust in the air and less sunlight to help recharge Ingenuity’s batteries. Dust levels are expected to subside later in July, so the team has decided to give the helicopter’s batteries a break for a few weeks and build their daily state of charge back up. Weather permitting, Ingenuity is expected to be back in the air around the start...
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Keeping Our Sense of Direction: Dealing With a Dead Sensor
This image was taken by the Perseverance rover with the Mars Helicopter Ingenuity on the surface of Mars at the location,
Ingenuity at Airfield D: This image of NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter was taken by the Mastcam-Z instrument of the Perseverance rover on June 15, 2021, the 114th Martian day, or sol, of the mission. The location, "Airfield D" (the fourth airfield), is just east of the "Séítah" geologic unit. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS. Download image ›
As the season has turned to winter in Jezero Crater, conditions have become increasingly challenging for Ingenuity, which was designed for a short flight-test campaign during the much warmer Martian spring. Increased amounts of dust in the atmosphere, combined with lower daytime temperatures and shorter days, have impacted Ingenuity’s energy budget to the point where it is unable to keep itself...
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About This Blog

These blog updates are provided by the Mars Helicopter team. The Mars Helicopter is a technology demonstration to test the first powered flight on Mars.

Dates of planned test activities are subject to change due to a variety of factors related to the Martian environment, communication relays, helicopter and/or rover status.

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Contributors+

  • Ben Morrell
    Ingenuity Operations Engineer, NASA/JPL
  • Bob Balaram
    Chief Engineer for the Mars Helicopter Project, NASA/JPL
  • David Agle
    Media Representative, NASA/JPL
  • Håvard Grip
    Ingenuity Mars Helicopter Chief Pilot, NASA/JPL
  • Jaakko Karras
    Ingenuity Chief Engineer, NASA/JPL
  • Josh Ravich
    Ingenuity Mars Helicopter Mechanical Engineering Lead, NASA/JPL
  • Joshua Anderson
    Ingenuity Mars Helicopter Operations Lead, NASA/JPL
  • Martin Cacan
    Ingenuity Pilot, NASA/JPL
  • MiMi Aung
    Ingenuity Mars Helicopter Project Manager, NASA/JPL
  • Teddy Tzanetos
    Ingenuity Team Lead, NASA/JPL

Where is the Mars Helicopter?

Image of a rover pin-point at Perseverance's location on Mars, Jezero Crater

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